Blog Entry

A worthwhile (believe me) look at steroids

Posted on: April 11, 2011 3:30 pm
 
For a few minutes last Friday, the steroid issue was alive again in baseball.

And then it faded away again.

My sense is that fans care about Manny Ramirez, but that his latest positive steroid test -- and his resulting sudden retirement -- didn't cause many people to rethink steroids and baseball in general. Neither, it seems, has the Barry Bonds trial.

If you truly don't care, feel free to skip on to the next post in this blog. If you do, read on, and also check out my friend Steve Kettmann's interesting essay on the Huffington Post website.

Kettmann has credibility on steroids, having written an August 2000 piece in the New York Times on the subject, and also having ghost-written Jose Canseco's book, Juiced , which brought steroids to more people's attention (and which has been proven true, in many respects).

Kettmann contends in the Huffington Post essay that Bonds will eventually be voted into the Hall of Fame. I think he may be right, although I think it will take years and years and years (and may well come from some form of veterans committee). It's pretty clear that in the next few years, no one with any significant steroid connection is going to be voted in.

But years from now, it's easy to see that changing.

I'm not sure how many of you care. I'm not going to tell you to care. But if you do, take a few moments to read what Steve wrote.
Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 14, 2012 3:09 pm
 

A worthwhile (believe me) look at steroids

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Since: Dec 2, 2011
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A worthwhile (believe me) look at steroids

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Since: Nov 19, 2011
Posted on: December 23, 2011 4:10 pm
 

A worthwhile (believe me) look at steroids

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Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 5, 2011 10:20 am
 

A worthwhile (believe me) look at steroids




Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 5, 2011 10:17 am
 

A worthwhile (believe me) look at steroids




Since: Nov 19, 2011
Posted on: December 3, 2011 3:57 pm
 

A worthwhile (believe me) look at steroids




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A worthwhile (believe me) look at steroids

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Since: Nov 27, 2011
Posted on: November 27, 2011 9:09 pm
 

A worthwhile (believe me) look at steroids




Since: Oct 11, 2006
Posted on: April 13, 2011 1:31 am
 

A worthwhile (believe me) look at steroids

Stones, I don't like it any more than you do. More than any other sport, baseball's statistics matter. They are almost sacred. I grew up reading the backs of baseball cards, and couldn't get my mind around Cecil Fielder jacking over 50 in one season, or Ricky stealing over 100 bases, or George Brett batting .390. But neither Bonds, nor any one one other player, tainted the game alone. It was an epidemic. Mass juicesteria. The fault lies at the top, as Knobler and his buddy correctly pointed out. Selig knew what was happening and by turning a blind eye they subtly encouraged the juice to fuel MLB's post-strike resurgence. All the owners did. Punishing certain players with no-hall votes for taking steroids is like black-listing an actress after learning she had fake boobs and botox. The steroid era is exactly that: an Era. In that era, numbers are not similar to those of previous eras. Like in the dead ball era, or after the pitching mound was lowered for the live ball era, you have to look at how players performed against their peers to see who were good sluggers and great pitchers and who weren't. And if there ever was released a final list of who cheated and who didn't (which there never will be), you could then add points to players who didn't cheat like college admissions weigh AP courses against standard courses. We all want to do that with guys like Griffey and Bernie Williams, and while I'm inclined to believe they never cheated, who really knows? It's just as unfair to dole out undue credit as it is to falsely accuse someone.




Since: Dec 16, 2007
Posted on: April 12, 2011 1:51 pm
 

It's a health issue not a cheating issue

Until Bud Selig, the players union, the owners, and the agents admit facilitating/covering up the performance enhancing drug use in baseball I can not hold a single player accountable.  Kettmann's piece is important because it focuses on what should be the central issue - the health issue.  Young athletes should not avoid steroids because it's cheating or because they might get suspended - they should not use them because of the enormous health risk.  Manny was an entertaining player - I hope he gets the help he needs.  Anabolic steroids are psychologically and physically addictive.  Miguel Cabrera continues to play while he receives treatment.  Manny Ramirez will be banished and if he does not get help will likely die.  If you want a real perjury trial put Selig in front of a grand jury and ask him what he knows.  If baseball wants to do the right think for the players and the young fans and athletes looking on it will treat steroid users as addicts who need help.


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