Blog Entry

Greatest Baseball Player of All Time Elite Eight

Posted on: September 21, 2008 8:42 pm
Edited on: September 21, 2008 9:07 pm
 
Semifinals

1. Babe Ruth
8. Honus Wagner

2. Willie Mays
7. Mickey Mantle

3. Ty Cobb
11. Walter Johnson

4. Ted Williams
12. Cy Young

Last time to vote is next Sunday at 7 PM central time

Let the voting begin!
Comments

Since: Sep 28, 2007
Posted on: September 24, 2008 12:26 am
 

Greatest Baseball Player of All Time Elite Eight

No trouble, mostly just my own stupidity getting the better of me once again...lol

 

Thanks

H




Since: Nov 7, 2006
Posted on: September 23, 2008 10:25 pm
 

Greatest Baseball Player of All Time Elite Eight

Thanks for the votes guys.



Since: Sep 30, 2006
Posted on: September 23, 2008 8:45 pm
 

Greatest Baseball Player of All Time Elite Eight

Poor Honus, would have most likely beat anyone else.  I think he is 2nd or 3rd best ever but vs the babe hes not going to make it :(



Since: Jan 17, 2007
Posted on: September 23, 2008 7:41 pm
 

Greatest Baseball Player of All Time Elite Eight

Babe Ruth

Willie Mays

Ty Cobb

Ted Williams




Since: Dec 6, 2007
Posted on: September 23, 2008 4:45 pm
 

Greatest Baseball Player of All Time Elite Eight

Babe Ruth
Willie Mays
Ty Cobb
Ted Williams

All Brackets are tough but I will take these four into the next round



Since: Nov 7, 2006
Posted on: September 23, 2008 4:40 pm
 

Greatest Baseball Player of All Time Elite Eight

Thanks for the votes mgm and Yankee..I appreciate the support.



Since: Jan 17, 2008
Posted on: September 23, 2008 4:23 pm
 

Greatest Baseball Player of All Time Elite Eight

Keep up the good work clutch.

1. Babe Ruth  This should be a contest for #2. Ruth is far and away the best ever. The most dominant hitter ever and the best left handed pitcher of his time.
 

2. Willie Mays   Mays wins mostly due to Mickey's injuries. At his best Mickey was better, but not by a lot. Mays never had a season like Mickey's in 1956 for example

11. Walter Johnson   One of the 2 best pitchers ever. Christy Matthewson's the  other in case you were wondering.

4. Ted Williams   Ted's numbers are just too awesome, while Young's are as much a product of when he played as his talent.



Since: Jun 25, 2008
Posted on: September 23, 2008 9:59 am
 

Greatest Baseball Player of All Time Elite Eight

This is an awesome blog.  I'm sorry I missed the earlier rounds.

 

My votes:

1. Babe Ruth- more of an overpowering dominating factor than Honus

2. Willie Mays - I think his defense and base running give him the edge over Mickey's offensive advantage although this is a close one

3. Walter Johnson - Just an awesome pitcher.  Ty Cobb was great but I think he could be more easily replaced by subsequent players than Wlater John son could by subsequent pitchers

4. Ted Williams - Ted was probably the best hitter of all time

 

Again great blog!

 




Since: Nov 7, 2006
Posted on: September 23, 2008 8:10 am
 

Greatest Baseball Player of All Time Elite Eight

Thanks for the votes golf.



Since: Dec 26, 2006
Posted on: September 23, 2008 1:00 am
 

Greatest Baseball Player of All Time Elite Eight

This man should've been on the list in my opinion.  He's the "Manny Ramirez" of old, except he's way better...

Lou Gehrig - The Iron Horse

Lou Gehrig's legendary accomplishments on the baseball diamond include a .340 lifetime batting average, the 15th highest in baseball history. He collected more than 400 total bases in five different seasons; a major league record.  Only 16 players have achieved that level of power in a single season, Babe Ruth did it twice and Chuck Klein three times. Gehrig is one of only ten players with more with than 100 extra base hits in a single season, and only he and Chuck Klein did it in two different years.

Lou Gehrig  - The Pride of the YankeesLou Gehrig hit 23 career grand slam home runs, a major league record, he hit 73 three-run homers and 166 two-run homers, giving him the highest average of RBI's per home run of anybody in history with more than 300 HR's.  On June 3, 1932, Gehrig hit four home runs in a single game becoming the first American League player to accomplish this feat.

Gehrig won the Triple Crown in 1934 with a .363 batting average, hit 49 HR's with 165 RBI's. He was voted the Most Valuable Player in 1927 and in 1936. In the 1920's, a player could only win the Most Valuable Player Award once in his career.  The award was changed in 1932 to allow a player to win it as often as he could. Either Gehrig or Babe Ruth would have won the MVP award every year in the 1920's and early 1930's as they were the greatest run producers baseball has ever known.  Lou Gehrig was a compulsive worker with a record of 2,130 straight games played, and he proudly played his whole career with the New York Yankees. He played every game for more than 13 seasons, despite a broken thumb, painful back spasms, and a broken toe. X-rays taken late in his career, showed Gehrig's hands had 17 different fractures that had healed while he continued to play.

Gehrig is the only player who can stand comparison with his spectacular teammate, Babe Ruth. Batting back-to-back in the Yankee lineup, Ruth batting ahead of Gehrig were the most fearsome combination in history. Lou Gehrig's RBI's totals catch one's eye first, next his great run scoring makes a compelling statistic to rank him as the game's greatest total runs producer in baseball's history.

In his 13 full seasons, Lou Gehrig averaged 147 RBI's a year, from 1926 thru 1938. No other player was able to even reach the 147 RBI mark until George Foster of the Cincinnati Reds did so in 1977.  In 1927, Gehrig had 175 RBI's, in 1930 he had 174 RBI's and in 1931 his 184 RBI's are the highest total in American League History.  Gehrig drove in over 150 runs in a season seven times, over 170 three times.

This great run producer scored on average 138.8 runs per season in his 13 years.  In 1927, Gehrig scored 149 runs, in 1931 he scored 163 runs and in 1936 he scored an incredible 167 runs.  Only in his last season did he score less than 120 runs and in that year he scored 115 times.



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