Tag:Celtics
Posted on: May 24, 2010 2:40 am
Edited on: June 5, 2010 2:16 pm
 

Cavs fire Brown; next up, LeBron (UPDATE)

The unraveling of the Cavaliers’ season came to its inevitable conclusion early Monday with a source confirming to CBSSports.com that coach Mike Brown has been fired.

Back-to-back 60-win seasons couldn’t save Brown from the backlash of another premature playoff ouster after the Cavs, with the best record in the league, were eliminated from the playoffs in six games by the Boston Celtics.

By firing Brown, the 2008-09 NBA coach of the year, by Sunday at midnight, the Cavs avoided his $4.5 million salary for next season becoming fully guaranteed. Since he was let go before the deadline, only half of Brown’s salary is guaranteed.

Brown, a strong defensive coach groomed in the successful Spurs organization, will immediately become a candidate for head coaching openings in New Orleans and Atlanta and perhaps elsewhere.

According to a second source familiar with the Cavs' strategy, Brown's ouster was the first -- and most important -- piece of the puzzle that had to be solved before Cleveland could proceed with its plan to persuade LeBron James to return to the Cavs once the free-agent negotiating period begins July 1. Recent reports have indicated that James recused himself from the decision on Brown, but decision makers in the organization were well aware that he was not pleased with the way the team failed to adjust to its opponent's style of play for the second straight postseason. Last season, it was Orlando foiling the Cavs' simplistic defensive rotations. This time, it was Boston shredding the Cavs' defense with Rajon Rondo's dribble penetration and mismatches on the interior, with Kevin Garnett exposing Antawn Jamison for the entire six-game series.

In a telling dose of doom for Brown after the Cavs' ouster in Game 6 of the conference semis, James was noncommittal about Brown and declined to come to his defense publicly when asked. Despite Brown's regular season success, it was only a matter of time before the playoff losses caught up to him. And in Cleveland, where an entire city is bracing for James' anticipated foray into unrestricted free agency, the regular season doesn't matter. Playoffs and championships do.

So with everyone from Mavericks owner Mark Cuban to President Obama urging LeBron to weigh his chances of winning a title in another city, the process of sucking up to James begins anew. What coach would persuade him to stay? Or better yet, what coach and supporting cast would persuade him not to leave?

Despite the Cavs' best efforts to placate him with roster additions that have not worked -- Mo Williams, Shaquille O'Neal, Jamison -- there is a growing belief among those familiar with the situation that James is more open than ever to the possibility that he would be able to find a better supporting cast in Chicago. Several factors independent of the Cavs' playoff collapse have enhanced the Bulls' position. The possibility of playing with Derrick Rose, and the fact that the Bulls have left their coaching job vacant -- with James' buddy, John Calipari, lurking in the wings and with Phil Jackson's contractual situation with the Lakers still unresolved -- have conspired to make the Cavs' job of keeping him even harder.

Step one was firing Brown, whether LeBron was directly involved in the decision or not. The next set of dominoes will begin tumbling almost immediately, with Cleveland engaging in a coaching search and LeBron getting some clarity as to what he'd be returning to if he stayed in Cleveland.

Whether Brown deserved to be fired is hardly the issue. Given the expectations, and what was at stake for James' future, it's hard to argue with the decision. Under those circumstances, you can't bring a team with the best record in the league into the playoffs and lose as thoroughly as the Cavs did and expect to keep your job. All we know for sure, though, is that one shoe has dropped. The big ones -- the franchise-shaping ones -- are coming next.




Posted on: May 20, 2010 6:40 pm
Edited on: May 20, 2010 7:02 pm
 

NBA gets it right with ref ban

What Joe DeRosa did at halftime Tuesday night wasn't egregious. It wasn't close to a federal offense, even in David Stern's court of law.

A fan in the first row behind the scorer's table was heckling DeRosa, an 18-year veteran NBA referee. DeRosa didn't like it, so he tossed the basketball at the fan. The fan caught it and fired it back. DeRosa motioned for the fan to be ejected. That was it. Nobody got hurt.

No harm, no foul. Right? The Eastern Conference finals between the Magic and Celtics would continue without incident.

Not quite. The NBA did the right thing Thursday when it suspended DeRosa for one game without pay over the incident.

Was the punishment too harsh? Too draconian? Not at all, and here's why: The NBA has zero tolerance for player behavior when it comes to interacting with fans. Players are simply not allowed to physically engage fans in any way for obvious reasons -- the 2004 Palace brawl chief among them.

One of the best things about the NBA is how close the fans are to the action. When media seats used to be courtside in every arena, one of the most enjoyable aspects of sitting there was the verbal sparring between hecklers and players, and oftentimes, hecklers and refs. In many cases, the players and refs respected the hecklers who brought some creative material to their courtside seats.

But under no circumstances can a player lose his cool to the point where he physically engages a heckler -- even from a distance by, say, throwing a ball at somebody. If a player did that, he'd be suspended without a doubt. And the NBA shouldn't have different standards for referees.
 
DeRosa's suspension speaks to that very need for consistency and was well deserved. Especially in light of the fallout from the Tim Donaghy scandal, what's good for the players has to be good for the refs, too.

Nobody in any job in America takes as much abuse, or has a greater responsibility to maintain his composure, than an NBA ref. It's certainly understandable why DeRosa lost his cool. He's human. But he still had to be punished. And in this case, the punishment fit the crime.






Posted on: May 20, 2010 5:42 pm
 

Old and slow? Maybe, but Fisher can still defend

LOS ANGELES – For three playoff series, Derek Fisher has heard about how he’s the weak link in the Lakers’ title defense. There was no way he could keep up with Russell Westbrook’s quickness, hold up against Deron Williams’ size, or stifle Steve Nash’s creativity.

“They say he’s old and slow,” noted philosopher and defensive guru Ron Artest said. “I just don’t see it.”

Nobody else does, either. And no, your eyes have not deceived you. Here are the Lakers, two wins away from a third consecutive trip to the NBA Finals – and they’ve gotten here not despite Fisher, but in large part because of him.

“I guess I’m smart enough to know that if we win, it doesn’t really matter,” Fisher said. “I guess for some guys it’s harder to not take things personally and try to be who they aren’t when the goal is really to help your team advance. And when you do that, the individual things kind of mean less. I’ve said it before: I’ve never seen anything on the side of any one of my rings that says anything about points per game, percentages per game, who had the most assists, who had the most steals. It’s just a ring. It has your name on it and the team and the organization and that’s it. That’s pretty much all that matters to me.”

No, Fisher, 35, hasn’t done it all by himself against the murderer’s row of point guards the Lakers are toppling on their way to the Finals. After Westbrook sliced through the Lakers’ defense in victories at Oklahoma City in Games 3 and 4 of the first round, Kobe Bryant raised his hand after a video session and said, “I’ll take him.” Bryant slowed Westbrook down, and the Lakers haven’t lost a game since – eight in a row heading into Game 3 of the conference finals Sunday in Phoenix.

But Fisher didn’t need much help against the Williams, arguably the best point guard in the league, as the Lakers swept past the Jazz. Nash, the gold standard for modern-day point guards – or point guards of any era, really – hasn’t been able to find the kind of space and freedom he’s accustomed to with Fisher digging in and using his underrated combination of strength, quick hands and good old fashioned guile.

“He can guard all the point guards,” TNT analyst Hubie Brown told me. “Fisher, in my opinion, is one of the feistiest defensive point guards that we have in the league. He’s very cerebral. He understands the defensive game plan. You can never fall asleep with the basketball because he’s got quick reflexes and quick reactions, plus he gets a lot of deflections. Then off of his man, OK, he’s one of the best point guards that we have in the league in double-teaming and also playing the passing lane on any type of a ball reversal back to his man.”

(Note to reader: At this point in my conversation with Brown the other day, I prayed that the Lakers’ practice court would open up and swallow me. In 30 seconds, Brown had said more intelligent things about basketball than I’ve ever written. And there was more to come.)

“This guy, you don’t hide this guy,” Brown said. “Also, if you break down his game, if he’s running in transition, you never have to worry about a guy getting a clear layup because he’s going to take a charge. And in this league, that’s very difficult for guys to do no matter what size they are – to take the full contact while people are moving. So to me, he’s the total package.”

In the Lakers’ 124-112 victory over the Suns in Game 2 Wednesday night, Fisher’s numbers didn’t measure up to Nash’s – but his impact on the game far exceeded his counterpart’s. Fisher had seven points on 2-for-8 shooting with five assists, two steals and two turnovers. Nash had 11 points and 15 assists, but shot only 4-for-8 from the field with five turnovers. At key sequences in the game – when the Lakers were building an early lead and then pulling away in the fourth quarter after the Suns had tied it at 90-90 – Fisher wound up on the superior end of the action.

Late in the first quarter, Fisher intercepted a post pass from Nash as the Suns were trying to find their offensive rhythm. Late in the second quarter, Fisher hurt the Suns with his offense – finding Andrew Bynum for a dunk, hitting a corner 3-pointer and making a driving layup to give the Lakers a 65-56 halftime lead. Midway through the fourth, Fisher forced Nash into consecutive turnovers, the first leading to a corner 3-pointer by Jordan Farmar on which Nash failed to close out defensively. In 67 seconds, the Lakers stretched a six-point lead to 11 and the rout was on.

“Steve can hurt you without scoring, whereas some of the other guys at the point guard position need to score for their team to win,” Fisher said. “Overall it’s exactly the same. You want to limit penetration. You want to keep the guy in front of you. You want to make him shoot the ball over the top instead of letting him get to the rim and make plays for himself or other people. You want to make him work as hard as possible. You’re not going to stop him, but you can’t allow him to do whatever he wants to do out there. And sometimes that means sacrificing yourself, your game, your body and that means picking up some fouls to do it. Just do what it takes.”

Next up, presumably, will be the Celtics' Rajon Rondo, who has been the single most influential point guard in the postseason -- better than Williams, Nash, Jason Kidd, all of them. Once again, it will seem to be an impossible task for Fisher to hold up against Rondo's length, speed, quickness and guile. And once again, Fisher will have to find a way.

That’s what he does: whatever it takes, and more than everybody expects.


Posted on: May 14, 2010 4:59 pm
Edited on: May 14, 2010 10:04 pm
 

How the Celtics did in Mike Brown (UPDATE)

On a day when the fallout hit the fan with alarming swiftness in Cleveland, it’s worth revisiting how the team with the best record in the NBA got in this predicament in the first place. 

There were numerous factors. The health and playoff savvy of their proud opponent, the Boston Celtics. The failure to re-integrate Shaquille O’Neal into the starting lineup after he’d missed the last six weeks of the regular season. LeBron’s free agency. LeBron’s elbow. 

All of it conspired to set a series of potentially devastating dominoes into motion. The first one – Mike Brown getting fired as the Cavs’ coach – didn’t tumble on Friday. But it’s teetering as violently as the emotions of fans all over northeast Ohio. 

Amid a report by SI.com that Cavs owner Dan Gilbert already has decided to fire Brown, Gilbert and GM Danny Ferry held their season-wrapup news conferences Friday and said that wasn’t true. It isn’t true yet, is what they should have said. Gilbert, in effect, delivered that very message when he refused to answer a point-blank question as to whether he could say definitively that Brown would be back next season. 

“I like the way you asked that question,” Gilbert said, and then he dodged it, saying everyone in the organization would be evaluated over the next 7-10 days. 

“We are going to take a long, deep, hard look at every key position in this franchise from top to bottom,” Gilbert said. “We’re not going to react emotionally the next morning after unexpectedly losing a series.” 

Essentially, the decision will be up to LeBron James, according to a person familiar with organizational dynamics. "That's where this thing is headed," said the person, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to discuss team business. "LeBron's going to make the call. That's what this is all about."

How could the Cavs be held hostage by James on the free-agent front and also have him deciding the future of their coach?

"Hey, they created this monster," the person said. "They kept giving in to him on everything and now you pay they price."

The notion that Brown is on his way out – after back-to-back 60-win seasons and only one year removed from being named NBA coach of the year – should be obvious to anyone who watched the Celtics-Cavs series. Boston coach Doc Rivers constructed a strategy aimed at attacking the Cavs’ biggest weaknesses, which is what any team tries to do. Few teams have executed such a plan better than the Celtics did. The fact is, as the aftermath engulfed the Cavs on Friday, the Celtics had to be amazed that their plan worked as well as it did. 

This wasn’t X’s and O’s. It was shock and awe. The Celtics saw not only weaknesses, but vulnerabilities – which are like festering weaknesses in basketball. They thought if they attacked certain areas successfully, it would not only result in good outcomes on the court, but potentially lethal side effects for the Cavs. The most damaging side effect of such a strategy is dissension, which became the theme for the Cavs over the last two games of the series. 

“You have to get a team to that point,” Ray Allen said. “It doesn’t involve taking shortcuts. You can’t just start games trying to go for the jugular right off the bat. It’s like an A, B, C all the way to Z process that all of us have to go through, and it requires everybody. When we’re as a team willing to put forth that effort from the offensive and the defensive end, then you can find those weaknesses and create that dissension.” 

The Celtics knew that going into the series, Brown already was facing an uphill battle with Shaq’s return to the lineup. They knew he’d feel pressured by Shaq’s reputation and $20 million salary to play him if he was healthy. The more Shaq was on the court, the Celtics believed, the better. The more he was on the court with Antawn Jamison, who hadn’t played alongside O’Neal until the playoffs began, that would be better still. 

The Celtics knew that Kevin Garnett would be able to attack Jamison, given that Garnett was one of the few opponents that Jamison ever faces with more size and length than he has. If the Celtics got Garnett going in a big way, that would free up Kendrick Perkins to wrestle under the basket with Shaq. All of this, they hoped, would lead to all kinds of griping and disagreements behind the scenes for the Cavs about who should be playing up front, and in which matchups. Sure enough, that’s just how it played out, with Brown eventually trying to re-insert Zydrunas Ilgauskas into the rotation in Game 5 – too late to quell the grumbling and insecurities in the Cavs’ locker room. Responding to the pressure of the unfavorable Garnett-Jamison matchup, Brown decided to start Game 6 with Shaq on Garnett and Jamison on Perkins. Um, that didn’t work, either. 

But that was only a small part of it. The Celtics knew that Mo Williams is a less than willing defender, and that he wouldn’t react well to pressure from Rajon Rondo, or to hard, physical screens. Williams shying away from contact in the Heat of a playoff battle would, in turn, infuriate LeBron to the point where Brown would have to take Williams off Rondo for stretches in games. Brown’s inability to solve the Rondo problem – he switched to Anthony Parker in the middle of the series, then started using LeBron in certain situations in Games 5 and 6 – only resulted in more dissension, which ultimately undermined Brown’s authority. 

The third key part of this divide-and-conquer paradigm was putting road blocks between LeBron and the basket and daring him to, 1) make the wrong basketball play by forcing his dribble into triple coverage, or 2) make the right play by passing to his teammates, who wouldn’t be up to the task. Time and again in the series, LeBron’s supporting cast melted under the pressure – from Williams, to Jamison, to Parker. The only one who stepped up consistently was Shaq, and the Celtics knew Shaq didn’t have enough left in the tank to carry his team for 48 minutes. 

It was obvious that the Celtics’ strategy was working when I asked James before Game 6 if he wanted to or planned to have any input into the game plan. He didn’t say he didn’t want to, only that it wasn’t his place. 

“It’s tough, because you don’t want to try to step on Coach’s toes,” James said. “It’s the whole coaching staff, and I agree with the system that they’ve put in. We’ve been successful in the postseason. We’ve been successful in the regular season. For me to go sit in the coaches’ meeting and say, ‘This is what I feel the strategy should be’, you only can go so far with that. You have to play the game and be around the game to understand exactly what I’m saying. You just can’t do things like that.” 

James didn’t have much nice to say about Brown throughout the series, and he refused to come to his coach’s rescue in the postgame news conference Thursday night, when he questioned Brown’s in-game adjustments. The Celtics were probably busy preparing for their next divide-and-conquer mission, Orlando, by then. But somewhere, they were smiling.
Posted on: May 14, 2010 2:44 am
 

Garnett to LeBron: Loyalty can hurt

BOSTON – At the end of a playoff series he’d been very much a part of winning, Kevin Garnett was asked the obligatory question about what LeBron James’ next few weeks will be like. 

Garnett did better than answer it. He offered LeBron a piece of advice. 

“Loyalty is something that hurts you at times, because you can’t get youth back,” Garnett said Thursday night after the Celtics eliminated the Cavs 94-85 with the help of his 22-point, 12-rebound performance straight out of 1998. “I can honestly say that if I could go back and do my situation over, knowing what I know now with this organization, I’d have done it a little sooner.” 

Garnett, one of the original high-school-to-the-NBA stars, will turn 34 the day after Game 2 of the Eastern Conference Finals against the Magic. Fifteen years in, he is chasing his second championship. The only thing loyalty got him was 12 years in Minnesota with one trip past the first round of the playoffs. 

“I don’t know what’s going through his mind,” Garnett said of LeBron. “He’s a different individual. I haven’t spoken to him or anything, but the world is his. Whatever he wants it to be, whatever decisions he makes are probably going to be best for him – not only him, but for him and his family. 

“He’s the face of basketball,” Garnett said. “I think his desire is definitely there. It’s going to be the talk of the summer because, you know, everyone’s going to be tuned in. It’s not just him, but D-Wade and Chris Bosh and all the other solid free agents available this summer. It’s going to be an interesting summer.” 

A summer that started early for LeBron, in large part because Garnett found his health and his youth and some puzzling defensive schemes perpetrated by the Cavs. After Garnett had caused major problems for Antawn Jamison in the first five games of the conference semifinals, Cavs coach Mike Brown’s counter move was starting the game with Shaquille O’Neal defending him – a matchup straight out of 1995, and one that should’ve stayed there. Garnett picked-and-popped Shaq right out of that defensive look, and nobody else had much luck with him, either. 

“It’s my 15th year, and I have seen almost everything that you can possibly do in a basketball game,” Garnett said. “My mentality throughout these whole playoffs has been attack, attack, to be the presence. So when they put Shaq on me, my thought process didn’t change. It didn’t change at all.” 

Something clicked for Garnett, and for the Celtics, once the playoffs started. He averaged 18.8 points and 8.0 rebounds in the series, and helped close it out Thursday night with a ferocious dunk that made it 88-74 with 5:53 left and a clutch hook shot off an inbounds play that wound up being the game’s last basket. 

“He’s healthier and happier, which makes all of us happier,” coach Doc Rivers said. “With health, I’m assuming that brings confidence.” 

And results, too.
Posted on: May 12, 2010 9:02 pm
 

Shaq: 'Others' need to help LeBron

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio -- Shaquille O'Neal, he of the enormous physique and four championship rings, made it clear Wednesday that he's a fan of LeBron James' leadership and also of the television hit LOST.

Before I had a chance to ask Shaq, "What lies in the shadow of the statue?" he'd also made it clear what needs to happen for the Cavs to save their season in Game 6 Thursday night in Boston.

"Nothing's wrong with him," Shaq said of LeBron. "It's our job as `others' to make him look good. We got to hit shots when he gives up the ball and we've got to play defense. We've got to open up the floor for him. When he's coming off the ball and kicking it, guys have got to hit shots. If you don’t hit shots, then that team's not going to respect other players and they're going to crowd the floor. He's playing the right way -- dribbling, and when they come, kick it to the guys. It's our job as `the others' to make him look good."

Though much of the focus has been on LeBron's 3-for-14 shooting night -- his third sub-par offensive performance in the series -- Shaq remained focused on the aspect of the game that has put the Cavs in the hole they're in.

"Our problem is not offense," Shaq said. "Our problem is, you can't let guys get historical triple-doubles and you can't let five guys get into double figures. So our problem is not offense. But is LeBron a great leader? One of the best I've ever played with."

Like LeBron, Shaq referred to the sense of panic that has descended on northeast Ohio as the Cavs face second-round elimination for the second straight year. Cleveland has been waiting 46 years for a pro sports championship, and everyone here thought this was the year.
 
"I wouldn’t say panic," Shaq said. "But it’s a beautiful city. It’s a great city. Forty-six years is a long time. And back in the day when they had Brad Daugherty and Mark Price, they almost had a chance. But I think this is a team that you look at and say, `This is our time.' I wouldn't call it anxiety or panic. It's just that 46 years is a long time to wait for such a beautiful city.

"We all know what's at stake here," Shaq said. "LeBron wants to win the whole thing. We all want to win the whole thing. We just have to make him look good and we just have to step it up on defense. ... Everyone knows what's at stake, and [Thursday] we'll see what we're made of."
Posted on: May 12, 2010 8:37 pm
 

Brown, LeBron respond to Gilbert rant

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio – After a loss that shook his title aspirations and $100 million payroll to their respective cores, Cavs owner Dan Gilbert was both strident and measured in comments to the Cleveland Plain Dealer. While Gilbert didn’t point fingers at anyone, the importance of his message wasn’t lost on coach Mike Brown. 

“Our entire franchise has done everything in its power to put all of our players and its coaching staff in the best possible position to execute when it counts,” Gilbert said. “And to deliver to the highly supportive fans of Cleveland a proud, intense, impassioned all-out drive to achieve a championship. 

“The last two home playoff losses and the manner in which we lost these games does not come close to being anywhere near the high expectations all of us have of our organization. Our fans and supporters deserve more.” 

Brown, under scrutiny for his use of personnel in the series against the Celtics, had those comments read to him Wednesday by members of the media, along with this one: “Above all, the fans of the Cleveland Cavaliers, as well as the entire franchise, deserve and need our players and coaches to dig deep within themselves.” 

Brown could find no cause to argue with any of it. 

“If what he said wasn’t the truth, I shouldn’t be here,” Brown said. “We’ve got to do better. The coaching staff's got to do better. The players have got to do better. We’ve got to go into Game 6 and win that game and make it a one-game series. I don’t know if what he said was not true or wrong or anything like that. The fans have been great. Ownership has been great. There's nothing that I can say even negative about it. We’ve got to do better.” 

Given all that is riding on this season for the Cavs – the financial commitment from Gilbert and LeBron James’ looming free agency – Brown almost certainly would be fired if the Cavs lost in the conference semifinals for the second straight year. As Gilbert pointed out, it’s not just the losing, but the 50-point margin of defeat in the last two home games that is particularly disturbing. 

The Celtics have gained a strategic advantage at every turn, exploiting the Cavs’ two weakest defenders, Mo Williams and Antawn Jamison. Couple that with the Celtics’ 36-7 advantage in second-chance points in Games 4 and 5, and Brown has been left searching for combinations on his bench that have not only backfired, but left players uncertain of their roles at the most crucial point in the season. Jamison has been lit up by Garnett in the first five games, while Rajon Rondo and Ray Allen have taken turns torching Williams. In Game 5, Paul Pierce had his first impactful game of the series with 21 points, 11 rebounds and seven assists. 

Brown called the criticism of his coaching in this series “part of the business” and “expected.” In fairness, Brown went into the playoffs with Shaquille O’Neal rejoining the starting lineup after a long layoff that didn’t give he and Jamison enough time to get comfortable playing alongside each other. After what Brown termed one of the best film sessions the team has had all season, he said he wasn’t planning any lineup changes for Game 6 Thursday night. 

“We've thought about everything,” Brown said. “But right now, there is nothing that has changed.” 

Given a chance to speak up on Brown’s behalf Wednesday, James took a pass. 

“The coaching staff, they put us in position to win games,” James said. “It’s up to us to go out there and execute that. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. But you can’t question the effort that we had.” 

Asked about assertions – such as this one – that Brown has been getting outcoached, James said, “I’m not going to get involved in that, man. That’s for you guys to write. You guys are at a point right now where you’re trying to divide the coaching staff and the team, the players. I’m not going to get involved in that. As players, we can control what we want to control. And right now, the most important thing is Game 6.” 

When Gilbert’s comments were read to LeBron, it became clear that the owner’s opinion was one area where Brown and James can agree. 

“It’s an owner who cares about our team and cares about the fans,” James said. “It’s a reaction that I guess he’s supposed to have. I don’t get involved in what owners say. That’s how he feels.”
Posted on: May 6, 2010 12:25 pm
 

Ainge fine: Funny but deserved

My thoughts on Celtics president Danny Ainge being fined $25,000 Thursday for throwing a towel in the air behind the basket in an effort to distract the Cavaliers' J.J. Hickson at the free-throw line during Boston's Game 2 victory? Oh, he deserved it. It was funny, but he deserved it.

The NBA's news release says Ainge engaged in "conduct detrimental to the game" and that he created an "unauthorized distraction."

That makes me wonder what constitutes an authorized distraction. But I can't argue with this penalty. Paying customers can whack Thunder sticks together, wave their arms, yell about a free-throw shooter's maternal relative -- pretty much anything they want to do, short of throwing something onto the court.

Players, coaches and team executives are held to a higher standard of conduct, and they should be.

Here's the YouTube clip of Ainge's actions, in case you missed it. Coincidentally, Hickson missed the first free throw with Ainge doing nothing. As Hickson is shooting the second free throw, you can see Ainge in a suit to the right of the basket (from Hickson's point of view), and you can see the towel fluttering into the air. Hickson made that free throw.

I wonder how much Ainge would've been fined if he'd missed it?
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com