Tag:LeBron James
Posted on: February 15, 2010 1:26 am
Edited on: February 15, 2010 2:09 am
 

Amar'e: Joining LeBron could be 'great'

ARLINGTON, Tex. -- Amar'e Stoudemire said Sunday he'd heard "nothing solid" on his fate with the trade deadline looming, even with the Suns engaged in talks with multiple teams about trading the five-time All-Star.

Asked about the possibility of playing with LeBron James in Cleveland, Stoudemire said it was "great" playing with him on the 2004 Olympic team in Barcelona, but that a trade with Cleveland was "not done yet."

Once again, Stoudemire leaves the All-Star Game wondering if he'll be changing teams the morning after.

"Gotta stick with what I know," Stoudemire said. "Right now, I'm a Phoenix Sun, so until anything changes I'm going to play the same way. ... I'm planning to travel to Memphis (Monday) to play the Grizzlies."

Several league sources told CBSSports.com that the Suns remained in discussions with at least three teams -- Cleveland, Miami and Philadelphia -- in a poker game that features Stoudemire as the grand prize. Two of his would-be teammates were on the court with him in the All-Star Game Sunday night -- James and Dwyane Wade. Another, Shaquille O'Neal, sat courtside and watched.

While the Suns brass were weighing which team could offer them the best combination of cap relief and assets, Suns owner Robert Sarver roamed the rotunda of Cowboys Stadium, watching Stoudemire and other All-Stars walk from the mixed-zone interview area toward the locker rooms.

"It's definitely an important decision," Sarver said. "I don't have any more comment." 
Posted on: February 13, 2010 10:25 pm
Edited on: February 13, 2010 11:10 pm
 

Stern: Cut expenses, but only the players'

DALLAS – NBA players simply make too much money, commissioner David Stern said Saturday night, and salaries must be curtailed to keep the league afloat. 

Citing $400 million in operating losses this season – and an average of $200 million annually in previous years of the current collective bargaining agreement – Stern issued a challenge to the players’ union to come back with a proposal that would develop “a sustainable business model.” 

“At our current level of revenue devoted to players’ salaries, it's too high,” Stern said. “I can run from that, but I can't hide from that, and I don't think the players can, either.” 

In a state-of-the-league address that was alternately witty and biting, Stern ridiculed union chief Billy Hunter’s assertion that the owners’ initial proposal was taken off the table during a contentious bargaining session Friday during All-Star weekend. 

“I don't know what that means,” Stern said. “We are talking semantics, and everyone around here knows that I am not anti semantic.” 

Ba-dump-bump. 

“I don't know what to say,” Stern said. “If they don't like it, you know, that's what counters are about. Speak to me, that's all. Off the table, on the table, under the table; I don't even understand it. The answer is, it's for them to make a proposal.” 

While Stern was in rare form on those topics, he artfully dodged three of the most important issues related to avoiding a lockout if the two sides can’t reach an agreement by June 30, 2011:

1) The 2010 free-agent class: Though Stern professed no urgency to reach agreement on a framework of a new economic system by July 1 of this year, the owners need cost-certainty by then in order to plan accordingly for spending on the biggest free-agent class in NBA history. Since the players like the current system, they’re in no hurry to speed up the process. So owners will have to risk committing max money to free agents this summer and having it come back to haunt them if the cap falls as far as the union predicts under the owners’ proposal – from $57.7 million to about $43 million.

2) Revenue Sharing: Stern said he’s committed to revamping the revenue-sharing model to help low-revenue teams compete. Despite saying it would be done “in lock step” with collective bargaining, Stern also said, “We can’t do it until we complete the negotiations.” Asked to explain why, Stern said, “We are going to do it all at once. It’s going to be when we have the new collective bargaining agreement.” According to internal NBA documents obtained by CBSSports.com, 12 teams averaged more than $1 million per game in ticket revenue during the 2008-09 season, with seven of those teams making the playoffs. Six teams made less than $600,000 per game, and only one – the Hawks – made the playoffs. “When we get to where we need to get to, there will be a very robust revenue sharing where teams will not be in a position to decline to compete because of money,” Stern said.

3) Other Ways to Reduce Expenses: While there have been cutbacks at the league office and on the team side, Stern admitted that his precious expansion to international markets has been a drag on the league’s financial picture. Stern referred to investments in such countries as India and China as having “not great margins.” But he refused to concede that reducing the league’s global efforts would be another way to rein in expenses. “We think that this will be a large payoff for future players that the present players are benefiting from because of investments that were made previously,” Stern said. But it seems to me that present players aren’t benefiting if the owners are asking them to accept less money while the league plans to open offices this year India, Africa, and the Middle East, with exhibition games planned for Mexico City, Barcelona, Paris, London, Beijing, Milan, and Guangzhou.

“Other expenses squeeze us,” Stern said, when pressed on the issue, “but player expenses are too high.”

Stern relished taking shots at what he described as the union’s “theatrics” during Friday’s negotiating session, though he later said, “I would have to plead guilty to participating a bit in such negotiations as well.” He accused union attorney Jeffrey Kessler, who also is handling CBA negotiations for the NFL, of “threatening us.” One such threat, Stern revealed after his news conference, was that the union would decertify and sue the NBA for anti-trust violations. Coincidentally, the league recognized during All-Star Saturday night festivities Spencer Haywood, the first player to challenge the NBA's eligibility requirements. Haywood's anti-trust lawsuit against the NBA went to the Supreme Court in 1971, and Haywood won the right to join the league although he didn't complete four years of college.

For the second straight day, a story published by CBSSports.com was raised in a news conference on the subject of labor talks. According to sources, Stern was referring to a Jan. 29 story in which a team executive ridiculed LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, saying James could “play football” and Wade could “be a fashion model” if they didn’t like the drastically reduced maximum contracts owners were proposing. Other news outlets published similar swipes, including Yahoo! Sports, which quoted an anonymous team executive who characterized the owners’ proposal as “a photocopy of Stern’s middle finger.” 

Stern said he was “offended” by the comments, calling them “cowardly,” and he apologized to players’ negotiating committee and the 10 All-Stars who were so enraged by the stories that they showed up at the bargaining session Friday. 

“Some of our so called team executives have been quoted – as you might expect anonymously – in the media, and saying disparaging things about our players,” Stern said. “If you know me, and you know our owners, that’s not what we do. That’s not us. And the players were upset with those quotes, which I find cowardly, if they were actually said. And if I ever found out who said them, they would be dealt with; they would be former, former NBA people, not current. And we assured the stars of that.” 

Posted on: February 12, 2010 8:20 pm
Edited on: February 12, 2010 10:18 pm
 

LeBron, Wade join CBA talks; owners pull proposal

DALLAS -- In a stunning development, 10 All-Stars including LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and Carmelo Anthony joined the collective bargaining talks Friday, standing in defiance of commissioner David Stern and the owners' negotiating committee during what was described as a "contentious" and "heated" bargaining session. The owners, according to union chief Billy Hunter, agreed to pull their current proposal off the table, relinquishing ground after hitting the union with demands for a hard salary cap and drastically reduced salaries.

Overreaching with a hard-line initial proposal submitted to the union on Jan. 29 may have backfired on the owners, whose demands for reducing the players' share of revenue, eliminating Larry Bird exceptions, reducing the length of contracts, and virtually eliminating guarantees got the attention of the league's stars. The murderer's row joining Hunter and the players' executive committee also included Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce, Rajon Rondo, Joe Johnson, Amar'e Stoudemire, Chauncey Billups and Al Horford. The players skipped their obligations at the NBA's annual All-Star "day of service" charity events to stand with Hunter and send a message to the owners.

"The players came in there and said, 'We don't want a fight,'" Hunter said. "'But if we're not given any other choice, we won't run from a fight.'"

Calling the owners' proposal "shock and awe" and a "non-starter," Hunter said the players would submit their own proposal in the "near future," but did not provide a date. He described the league as "eager" to get a deal in place by July 1, which marks the beginning of the biggest free-agent signing period in NBA history. The economics behind that impending bonanza are now seriously clouded with the owners and players back to square one in their negotiations.

The current deal, ratified in 2005, expires after the 2010-11 season. The owners, citing massive financial losses they have documented to the union over the past few months, already have notified the players that they will not exercise their option to extend the current deal through the 2011-12 season.

Adam Silver, the NBA's deputy commissioner, issued a statement late Friday disputing Hunter's account.

"While we do not agree with the Players' Association's characterization of today's meeting or the status of the NBA's bargaining proposal, David will address the subject of collective bargaining during his media availability prior to All-Star Saturday night," Silver said.

A year ago at All-Star weekend in Phoenix, Hunter joined Stern for a joint address as an indication of unity heading into the bargaining process. On Friday, Hunter said he had not received a similar invitation for this year and didn't believe one would be forthcoming.

In his first public comments on the owners' proposal, Hunter cited a Jan. 29 story by CBSSports.com in which a source detailed the owners' strategy to drastically reduce the length and amount of max contracts in the new CBA. The report, in which a team executive with knowledge of the bargaining process detailed the owners' belief that the players "need us more than we need them," only served to "inflame" the players, Hunter said. A particular quote from the article was read to the owners' negotiating committee and Stern during Friday's negotiating session at the Sheraton Hotel in Dallas.

“If they don’t like the new max contracts, LeBron can play football, where he will make less than the new max,” said the team executive, who spoke to CBSSports.com on condition of anonymity for the Jan. 29 article. “Wade can be a fashion model or whatever. They won’t make squat and no one will remember who they are in a few years.”

The article, and others written on the topic by other media outlets, was circulated to the players -- resulting in the 10 All-Stars going directly from All-Star media day interviews to join the bargaining session across town.

"What it really did was, it really inflamed a lot of the players," Hunter said.

The owners "sensed that this thing had gotten out of control a little bit because of the nature of the proposal that was sent, sort of like when you go for the jugular," Hunter said. "And then when we read stuff ... that they’re going to decimate the union and they’re going to do all these things, I kind of read that back to them and said, 'These are the kind of things that inflamed the players. You can't talk about how you’re going to destroy the union, you’re going to impose the same system that happened in the NHL. And the players came in and said, 'We don’t want to go that way.'"

Hunter said the owners "maybe underestimated the response, the blowback they were going to get from the proposal."

New details of the owners' proposal and their posture -- including their desire to agree to a deal before free agency begins July 1 -- emerged from Hunter's press conference, where he was joined by executive committee members Derek Fisher (president), Adonal Foyle, Theo Ratliff, Roger Mason, Maurice Evans, and Keyon Dooling. Committee member Chris Paul, on crutches as he recovers from knee surgery, attended the bargaining session but not the press conference.

The owners sought to reduce the players' current share of basketball-related income from 57 percent to a figure estimated by union sources to be 37 percent. This would be derived by deducting $1 billion of expenses from the $3.7 billion in annual revenue and then dividing it 50-50 between owners and players. The result, sources said, would be a loss of $750 million for the players in the first year of the new CBA.

The maximum length of contracts would be reduced to four years if a player re-signs with his current team and three years for other free agents from the current length of six years and five years, respectively. Annual raises would be reduced to 2-3 percent, down from 8 percent and 10.5 percent, depending on the contract.

Salary cap exceptions -- such as the Larry Bird exception, which allows teams to go over the cap to retain its own free agents -- would be eliminated. Guaranteed contracts would be dramatically curtailed, allowing only 50 percent of the first $8 million and 25 percent of the rest to be guaranteed, sources said. Contracts would be retro-fitted to conform to the new deal. On balance, the changes would cut roughly in half the maximum salary a top-shelf free agent like James or Wade would be able to receive. Hunter said such a deal would create a system where only two players per team make max money and the rest of the roster would be filled out by minimum-salary players.

"Pretty much everything that they could ever think of, at least in the 15 years I've been here, was in that proposal," Hunter said. "And so our position that it was a non-starter. That was the posture we took from the moment we arrived."
Posted on: January 23, 2010 12:37 am
 

Kobe hits the Lakers where it hurts

NEW YORK – The mental minefield Kobe Bryant began planting in Cleveland stretched all the way to New York, where the Lakers embarked on the second game of an eight-game road trip with his words still ringing in their ears.

Not tough enough.

Not part of their D.N.A.

Need to be hungrier.

“He’s a killer,” Lamar Odom was saying in the visiting locker room at Madison Square Garden Friday night. “He’s always gonna see things the way he sees them. He’s our leader, so if he sees that then we have to address it – and the way we address it is on the court. … Our problem right now is our cockiness, so he might be right.”

After the Lakers failed to close out a game in Cleveland Thursday night, thus surrendering the season series to the Cavs, Bryant wanted to leave no doubt about where the defending champs’ heads must be on this trip. The Lakers ran out to an 18-3 start, playing only four of their first 21 games on the road. Now they’re 0-2 against the Cavs and had lost five of their last six road games entering the Garden Friday night.

“Guys need to get going,” Bryant said after the Lakers beat the Knicks 115-105, “because I need them on this trip.”

Complacency has always been the enemy of these Lakers, and Bryant knows by now which buttons to push. He had stewed for months after the Lakers proved too soft to beat the Celtics in the ’08 Finals, and so he went for the jugular after the Cleveland loss by trotting out those hurtful buzzwords at the first sign of weakness.

Nobody in the NBA senses weakness like Bryant, and that goes for his teammates – not just his opponents.

Phil Jackson didn’t necessarily agree with Bryant’s assault on the Lakers’ lack of toughness, but it didn’t matter. The message was delivered. And it wasn’t just delivered to the notebook-toting masses. It was delivered in the locker room, too.

“We have to be prepared for teams to come after us,” Odom said. “I never knew how hard it was gonna be to try to repeat as champions. He does. So that might be his way of pushing us a little bit.”

Needing a push has been part of the problem, according to renowned locker-room philosopher Ron Artest. It was Artest who was brought to L.A. to stop LeBron James, and he willingly admitted Friday night that he’s 0-for-2. On Christmas Day, LeBron scored 26 in a 102-87 Cleveland victory and Artest fell down some stairs at home afterward and got a concussion. On Thursday night, LeBron had his way again with 37 points in a 93-87 victory without injured guard Mo Williams.

“I guess that’s why they got me, to take him out of the game,” Artest said. “[Thursday] it didn’t work. They got us this year, so all we can do is move on from that and see what happens in the playoffs.”

Artest is new to the Lakers’ midseason blahs, but he’s a quick study. The Lakers are so good, so talented, so dominant, he said, that the games are too easy for them to be engaged all the time.

“We haven’t played good basketball this whole year and I don’t even know how we’re in first place,” Artest said. “We don’t even know. We’re out there sometimes trying to figure out how we’re still in first place. … You can play against a couple of teams that have some star players or whatever, coast through the whole game, and win by 20 – real easy. And that’s how it’s been for us this whole season. A lot of wins just came from it really just being too easy for us. Sometimes it’s not fair. We’re up 20 in the first quarter. What else are you gonna do but win by 100 points? I guess that’s what we have to start doing.”

That’s where Bryant comes in, pressing his teammates’ feet back on the pedal. The ring finger on his shooting hand is broken in two places, his back is sore, and he just passed the halfway point of his 14th season. With those ailments and mileage, on the second night of a back-to-back, there wasn’t enough in the tank for his usual Garden explosion; Bryant was 8-for-24 for a pedestrian 27 points. But even if he had it in him, he said his teammates didn’t deserve it.

“I don’t think the way that we’re playing right now that we’re ready for that,” he said.

The rest of the trip will take them to Toronto, Washington, Indiana, Philadelphia, Boston, and Memphis a week from Monday. At some point, Bryant wants the D.N.A. to mutate.

The Lakers are 33-10, a half-game up on Cleveland for the best record in the league. If they face the Cavs in the Finals, they’re going to need it to attain homecourt advantage.

“We didn’t have [the best record] last year,” Jackson said. “And all of a sudden, Cleveland lost and Orlando stepped out into the vacuum. You can’t diminish it, but at some time you have to win on the road.”

Having achieved his desired result, at least for one night, Bryant went about his usual postgame meet-and-greets in the crowded hallways of the Garden, his favorite arena. He signed a pair of shoes for an actor from India, greeted someone who used to play in the driveway with Bryant’s father, Joe “Jelly Bean” Bryant, and shook every outstretched hand. Then it was down the freight elevator to a car that would take him to West 125th Street in Harlem, to a hush-hush event at the House of Hoops.

Mind games will resume on an as-needed basis.
Posted on: January 22, 2010 9:01 pm
 

Artest: Cavs 'nothing' without LeBron

NEW YORK – Ron Artest is always good for a laugh, even the night after the Lakers lost to the Cavs for the second time this season. But in this case, he has a point.

Asked before the Lakers played the Knicks Friday night if the Cavs would be a playoff team without LeBron, Artest didn’t hesitate.

“Actually I thought about that [Thursday],” Artest said. “If you take LeBron off that team, no. They’re not. They’re nothing. Not that they’re nothing, they’re still human beings. But you take him off that team, no. I guess that’s why they got me, to take him out of the game. [Thursday] it didn’t work. They got us this year, so all we can do is move on from that and see what happens in the playoffs.”

Artest, who is from Queensbridge – a rough neighborhood just across the East River from Manhattan – always attracts a crowd of reporters when he plays at the Garden. He still represents one of many might-have-beens for the Knicks after the team passed on the former St. John’s star in the 1999 draft, when they picked Frederic Weis instead.

“No disrespect to Cleveland, but we need some star power here in New York,” Artest said. “We need some legit star power, so I can come down and beat up on ‘em. We still need some star power here in New York. We need one of those big-time players to come here and get a great team, and when the Lakers play the Knicks, we beat ‘em by like 40 or 50 points. It would be great hopefully one day to see a New York-L.A. championship. I don’t have any power to do that, but it would be nice.”

Don't blame me, Cavs fans. I don't make the news. I merely report it.
Posted on: January 21, 2010 12:46 pm
 

Best NBA rivalries ever

With Kobe vs. LeBron Thursday night in Cleveland, it's the perfect time to come up with a list of the top five individual rivalries in NBA history.

Michael Jordan makes the list, but only barely; he never had an individual rival or anyone close to his equal.

Kobe and LeBron make it, even though they haven't (yet) competed head-to-head for a championship. But as (arguably) the two best individual performers in the game -- albeit at different stages of their careers -- this is as good as it gets in modern times. (And not because of the puppet commercials.)

So with the following rough criteria -- competing for championships, relative difference in skill level, and the competitiveness of their teams -- here are my top five individual rivalries in NBA history:

1) Wilt Chamberlain vs. Bill Russell: This is a no brainer. The two dominant players of their generation competed for the Eastern Conference title six times and the NBA title twice. Russell forever lords over Chamberlain in the debate over who (other than Jordan) was the best player ever, due to his 11 championships compared to Chamberlain's two.

2) Larry Bird vs. Magic Johnson: Their rivalry began in college with the seminal NCAA title game between Indiana State and Michigan State in 1979, which made the NCAA Tournament what it is today. It continued throughout their NBA careers with the Celtics and Lakers lifting the NBA to national prominence with three NBA Finals matchups in the '80s. Lakers vs. Celtics is all you need to say to conjure memories than span generations.

3) Bird vs. Julius Erving: Before we had Bird vs. Magic on the NBA stage, we had Bird vs. Dr. J. Their teams met in the Eastern Conference Finals in four of the first six years of the '80s, splitting the four meetings to determine who would go on to face the Lakers in the Finals (with the exception of 1981, when the Celtics faced the Rockets). Who among us (in 35-and-up demographic) didn't get his first video game experience on that grainy but thrilling "One on One" video game featuring Bird and Dr. J?

4) Kobe vs. LeBron: I put them here because of A) What is, and B) What might still be. LeBron is just entering his prime, when presumably he will begin stockpiling championships. Unlike Jordan at a similar stage of his career, LeBron has a formidable, immortal rival in Bryant who is still standing in the way. Kobe continues to play at a high level and has a chance to keep LeBron's championship trophy case barren for a couple of more years. (And they have the puppet marketing machine going for them, too.)

5) Jordan vs. Isiah Thomas: As inhabitants of the same conference, Mike and Zeke never squared off with a championship on the line. But Jordan's epic battles against Isiah's Bad Boy Pistons -- taking his lumps in the '89 and '90 Eastern Conference Finals before finally breaking through in '91 -- marked the emergence of one of the all-time greats. By supplanting Isiah and the Pistons, Jordan dispensed with the last true individual rival he would face en route to six NBA titles in eight years. Their rivalry also transcended the court; it was personal. Isiah's alleged "freezeout" of Jordan in the 1985 All-Star Game, Jordan's alleged efforts to sabotage Thomas' failed bid to be included on the 1992 Dream Team, and the visceral hatred that exists to this day between Jordan's long-time agent, David Falk, and Thomas makes this a must in my top five.






Posted on: January 21, 2010 11:39 am
Edited on: January 21, 2010 7:48 pm
 

All-Star Starters (UPDATE)

Embarrassment averted.

The All-Star starters were revealed Thursday night on TNT before the nationally televised rematch of the Cavs' Christmas Day blowout of the Lakers.

Thankfully, Tracy McGrady wasn't one of them.

All hail Steve Nash, who passed T-Mac in the final weeks of voting and will start alongside Kobe Bryant in the Western Conference backcourt in the Feb. 14 All-Star Game in Dallas. McGrady, who has played all of six games this season, won't be faced with the inglorious decision of having to decline an invitation he didn't deserve.

In another fan-voting quirk that was less controversial than a T-Mac starting nod would've been, Allen Iverson will start alongside Dwyane Wade in the Eastern Conference backcourt. The other East starters: Dwight Howard, LeBron James, and Kevin Garnett (assuming he's healthy).

Joining Kobe and Nash on the West's starting five: Carmelo Anthony, Amar'e Stoudemire, and Tim Duncan, who passed Dirk Nowitzki in the final three weeks of voting.

"No Dirk as a starter?" Mavs owner Mark Cuban tweeted. "Time to change the rules for voting."

McGrady carried a 2,375-vote lead over Nash into the final three weeks of balloting, which was conducted by fans via paper, online, and wireless voting. If Nash hadn't passed McGrady, the right thing for T-Mac to do would've been politely decline.

It wouldn't have cost him a dime, either. A source with knowledge of the situation said McGrady has no All-Star bonus clauses in his contract, which pays him a league-high $23 million this season.

It's better for everyone this way. McGrady is trying to come back from microfracture surgery. More to the point, he would benefit immensely if the Rockets were somehow able to trade him before the Feb. 18 trade deadline. McGrady didn't need to risk his health or his already suffering reputation by trying to dust himself off for a few meaningless All-Star minutes.

I don't have a problem with Iverson starting; he's been a fan favorite his entire career, certainly deserves it based on his body of work, and -- this is important -- is actually suiting up for the Sixers, albeit at a remarkably reduced rate of effectiveness.

In spite of Nash's fortunate comeback, I agree with Boston's Ray Allen and would be in favor of tweaking the voting system to divide the say-so among fans, media members, and players. The players, more than anybody else, know who's deserving and who isn't. The coaches should retain their ability to select the reserves. 

On one hand, you don't want to take away the fans' investment in the game, which after all is at least partly -- or mostly -- for their entertainment. But the All-Star Game badly needs a dose of legitimacy. Gone are the days when Michael Jordan or Dominique Wilkins could dominate All-Star weekend with their exploits in the dunk contest. That exercise long ago became a farce, and once again none of the marquee stars will participate this year.

So instead of complaining, I offer a solution. Not the only solution, but a start. Instead of voting by position, the fans vote for any 10 players they want from each conference. The players do the same. Their votes are weighted equally, and the top eight in each conference make the team. All 30 coaches vote to determine the 10 starters. The East coach and West coach fill out the roster with four reserves each.

The media? I'm not sure whom to count as media anymore, so let's leave us out of it. We'll just write about what happens.

Perfect? No. Somebody will get snubbed; they always do. But it's better than people constantly texting the word McGrady until they almost succeed in making a mockery of what is supposed to be a serious honor.

If there are any better ideas out there, you know what to do.






Posted on: November 14, 2009 3:35 pm
 

Hey, LeBron: Stick to 2010 talk

I enjoy Stan Van Gundy's curmudgeonly nature. Sometimes, I poke fun at him. But I've never enjoyed anything he's ever said more than his stance on LeBron James' call for the NBA to retire Michael Jordan's No. 23.

"It's a nice gesture," Van Gundy said Friday, "but he is not Jackie Robinson."

Nor is he Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain, or Oscar Robertson. No basketball league retires No. 23 until those other numbers are retired, too.

Retiring jersey numbers is a team decision, not a league decision. Funny, I thought it was a LeBron decision. I thought everything was up to LeBron. I wouldn't be surprised if LeBron wanted No. 23 retired because it's his number.

What made this even more comical was that LeBron said he'd be switching to No. 6 out of deference to Jordan -- but not out of deference to Russell, evidently.

LeBron's insistence on sucking up to Jordan is, to borrow a phrase from the King himself, getting old. He should go back to talking about how humbled he is that half the teams in the NBA want him to wear their jersey, regardless of the number on it.

And one more suggestion: If any numbers get retired, it should be those worn by the actual pioneers who broke the NBA's color barrier: Chuck Cooper (first black player drafted), Nat "Sweetwater" Clifton (first signed), and Earl Lloyd (first to play in a regular season game).




 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com