Tag:Anderson Varejao
Posted on: September 26, 2010 7:14 pm
 

Nuggets exploring their options

There was renewed hope Sunday that a four-team trade sending Carmelo Anthony to the Nets was still alive, with the framework of the deal possibly expanding to include additional players and possibly another team, CBSSports.com has learned.

But a weekend of inertia continued to frustrate the three teams Denver hastily recruited to accelerate Anthony’s departure, with executives standing firm in their belief that the longer the delay, the stronger the chance that the precarious structure of the trade could fall apart.

Among New Jersey, Utah and Charlotte, sources say least concerned were the Nets, who understandably have “no deadline” to pull off the blockbuster, franchise-shaping deal. The problem is with the pieces volunteered by the Jazz and Bobcats, who’d benefit the least from the arrangement and want to avoid unnecessary distractions heading into training camp this week. Charlotte’s role in the existing deal would be to send Boris Diaw to Utah and receive Devin Harris from the Nets, while Utah would send Andre Kirilenko to the Nuggets, who’d get No. 3 pick Derrick Favors and two first-round picks from New Jersey. Quinton Ross also would go from New Jersey to Utah.

“No one wants to go to camp with drama,” said one executive not involved in the pursuit of Anthony, who ignited the sweepstakes by refusing to sign a three-year, $65 million extension while his high-powered agents, Leon Rose and William Wesley, pushed hard all summer for a trade.

Sources say the Nuggets have been taking full advantage of the holding pattern in talks to listen to offers from other teams – though executives with knowledge of the situation do not believe a better offer has presented itself. The Bulls and Clippers, two teams with attractive assets and a realistic chance of persuading Anthony to sign an extension with them, have not progressed beyond the packages they initially brought to Denver’s attention. Some signs Sunday pointed to the revival of talks between Denver and Philadelphia with Andre Iguodala going to the Nuggets, but there was no signal from Anthony’s camp that he’d softened in his opposition to bringing his talents to South Philly.

Another player the Nuggets have targeted as a viable asset to recover in an Anthony trade, Anderson Varejao, remains a long shot for the same reason; Anthony isn’t going to Cleveland, the city that superstar LeBron James fled in July as though the Cuyahoga River were on fire.

So on the second front, the Nuggets are trying to determine whether another player within the current framework of the deal or even a fifth team would be able to further sweeten the reward for parting with the organization’s best player in two decades. The Nets are said to have “exhausted” the options available to the Nuggets in the current structure of the trade, with one possibility having Harris going to Denver instead of Charlotte. What Nuggets officials are weighing there, according to an executive with knowledge of the talks, is whether Harris might have more value as a trade chip than Kirilenko – an indication that Denver would view itself as being in full-blown cost-cutting and rebuilding mode without Anthony in the fold. Kirilenko, with a $17.8 million expiring contract, would seem to have more value than Harris, who is owed $27 million over the next three years. The Nuggets have not asked the Bobcats for Gerald Wallace, according to one executive familiar with the negotiations.

With nothing happening to push the discussions any closer to completion or extinction, Anthony could very well still be a Nugget during media day Monday at the Pepsi Center, which brings the saga to its next critical turning point. Anthony’s presence around the team will give GM Masai Ujiri his first chance to sit down face-to-face with the superstar and hear directly from him on his level of comfort with the best offer the team has received to move him.

Coach George Karl, whose ability to influence Anthony’s position should not be underestimated, also will have a chance to be in the room. This way, Nuggets officials will be able to hear first-hand from Anthony where he stands on the direction of the organization and his comfort level with joining a New Jersey team that would still be one major piece away from championship contention after adding Anthony. To this point, the vast majority of communication with Denver officials has come from Anthony’s advisers with Creative Artists Agency – most notable Rose and Wesley, who staunchly favor a trade to pastures they argue are greener than in Denver.

What the Nuggets are hoping, at the risk of jeopardizing the best offer they may get, is that Anthony’s angst will subside once he’s back with the only team he’s known during his seven-year career. He may conclude that he wouldn’t be much better off somewhere else.
Posted on: September 25, 2010 8:49 pm
Edited on: September 26, 2010 1:51 am
 

Melo deal in holding pattern

In the 24 hours since Nuggets general manager Masai Ujiri and executive Josh Kroenke left New York City, where face-to-face negotiations with Nets officials rapidly transformed the Carmelo Anthony saga into a game of who blinks first, the discussions have stalled, according to officials familiar with the situation.

Two people with knowledge of the negotiations described them Saturday as stagnant, with a third person going so far as to say talks were "still developing." Anthony himself, watching the UCLA-Texas game from his Los Angeles home, was said to be telling friends simply that there was nothing new to report.

No news is ever good news with a trade this big and complicated, with stakes this high. And it appears that Denver's strategy to accelerate Anthony's trade demand into a full-blown poker game, with an unofficial deadline of Monday, could be jeopardizing the potential blockbuster that would send Anthony to the Nets.

"With every day that passes," said one executive not actively pursuing Anthony, "the bigger deals fall apart."

The talks were not there yet Saturday, with one source describing the slow-dancing tactic from Denver simply as "part of getting a deal done." But even management sources who've been confident from the beginning that Anthony would sign off on a trade to New Jersey recognize how many other things could go wrong in a trade of this magnitude.

As things stood Saturday, the Nuggets were still getting No. 3 pick Derrick Favors from the Nets and Andrei Kirilenko from the Jazz. Devin Harris would go from the Nets to the Bobcats, who would send Boris Diaw to Utah. New Jersey also would send two first-round picks to Denver -- its own and Golden State's protected first-round pick in 2012 -- and Quinton Ross to the Jazz. Charlotte continued to balk at sending point guard D.J. Augustin to the Nets, and New Jersey officials were seeking to expand the deal in the pursuit of a point guard to replace Harris.

Multiple executives monitoring the Melo developments believe that publicizing the four-team trade talks was an effort on Denver's part to solicit better offers from other teams. However, the list of teams believing they have a shot at getting Anthony to agree to an extension is short; he's made clear from the beginning that his first choice is New York, with Chicago, the Nets and possibly the Clippers also having a chance.

One team clearly not on Anthony's list, Cleveland, deserves to be mentioned nonetheless because sources indicate that Anderson Varejao is among the players Denver has targeted as an acceptable replacement asset for Anthony. The others are Kirilenko, Andre Iguodala and Gerald Wallace, a person with knowledge of the team's strategy said.

The anticipated avalanche of offers, however, did not appear to be forming Saturday. One team with an outside shot at getting Melo's approval was described by sources as "not trying." Also, an executive on the periphery of the talks described Denver's negotiating stance as "delusional."

Anthony's first choice, the Knicks, have the expiring contract of Eddy Curry and young players to offer, but lack the first-round picks Denver is seeking. However, team president Donnie Walsh is said to be in no frenzy to acquire an attractive first-rounder. Sources say Walsh is playing his own game of poker and is unwilling to jeopardize the progress he's made in rebuilding the Knicks' roster and cap position -- a monumental task over the past 2 1-2 years. He also knows that if Anthony wants to come to New York badly enough, he can arrange that as a free agent after the season.

The team with arguably the most attractive first-round pick to offer -- the Clippers, who own a 2011 first-rounder from Minnesota that is unprotected in 2012 -- were nowhere near the Melo talks Saturday, sources said.

While sources who predicted that completing the structure of the deal would be more difficult than getting Anthony's approval to re-sign with the Nets were validated with Saturday's developments, a significant roadblock on the Anthony front still exists. With Favors being sent to Denver in the proposed deal, leaving center Brook Lopez as the only potential All-Star on the roster besides Anthony, the soon-to-be-ex-Nugget was said to be "worried about going there by himself," according to one executive familiar with the situation.

Thus, a significant aspect of what Anthony is mulling is whether Chris Paul -- a fellow client of Creative Artists Agency's Leon Rose-William Wesley tandem -- would be willing to join him there. Anthony, however, would have to wait until 2012 when Paul can become a free agent. That would coincide with the Nets' move to Brooklyn, but a lot can -- and will -- happen between now and then: a new collective bargaining agreement, possibly a lockout, and two seasons for Anthony in Newark, which is only a few miles from the Seventh Avenue entrance to Madison Square Garden but is really light years away.

 

 
 



Posted on: September 21, 2010 3:13 pm
Edited on: September 21, 2010 3:28 pm
 

Preseason Primers: Cavaliers


The misnomer about LeBron James leaving Cleveland is that people thought fans in Northeast Ohio were mad at him for leaving. Wrong. They were mad at him for the way he left. So with the first post-LeBron training camp around the corner, the Cavs’ brass are hoping the fan base is as realistic and patient as they will be as they recover from the Decision and all that it wrought. Internally, the Cavs have moved on. They have a new coach with rebuilding experience (Byron Scott) and a new front-office team with a lot of promise and assets at their disposal (GM Chris Grant and VP of basketball ops David Griffin).

Personnel-wise, no one inside the organization is putting any limits on what this team can do. The bad: They lost LeBron, and simply won’t recover in the short term. The good: They still believe they have the defensive foundation that Mike Brown built, along with enough shooters (Anthony Parker, Mo Williams, Daniel Gibson), former All-Stars (Antawn Jamison) and defensive dynamos (Varejao) to be competitive until the opportunity to pounce on a major personnel upgrade presents itself. Until then, here’s your preseason primer on the Cavs without you-know-who:

Training camp site: Independence, Ohio

Training camp starts: Sept. 28

Key additions: Ramon Sessions (trade), Ryan Hollins (trade), Joey Graham (free agent), Christian Eyenga (draft)

Key subtractions: Shaquille O’Neal (free agent), Delonte West (trade), Zydrunas Ilgauskas (free agent), Sebastian Telfair (trade), plus franchise identity, millions in ticket/merchandise sales, and the very soul of a tortured, doomed sports populace (i.e. some guy named ... oh, never mind).

Likely starting lineup: Williams, PG; Parker, SG; Joey Graham, SF; Jamison, PF; Anderson Varejao, C.

Player to watch: J.J. Hickson. He’s the guy the Cavs refused to give up in any trade scenario for Jamison or Amar’e Stoudemire. With you-know-who out of the picture, Hickson should benefit from increased touches and has a chance to be a bright spot as the otherwise dismal post-you-know-who era begins.

Chemistry check: Williams and Jamison both thought they were coming to Cleveland to win titles with you-know-who. Well, with you-know-who having taken his you-know-whats to South Beach, it will be interesting to watch how these veterans approach a daunting rebuilding project.

Camp battles: Graham, Jamario Moon and Jawad Williams will have a lively competition to replace you-know-who at small forward.

Biggest strength: If you take the glass-half-full approach, this is actually the ideal opportunity for Scott to re-establish a winning culture and instill his usual combination of defense, toughness, up-tempo offense and conditioning without getting pushback from cranky veterans who have grown tired of him. (That comes later.) Also, as difficult as this is for Cavs fans to swallow, the Cavs acquired some very useful assets in the sign-and-trade transaction that ultimately sent you-know-you to Miami. With multiple future first- and second-round picks, expiring contracts and a $14.5 million trade exception, the Cavs are positioned nicely when the right opportunity presents itself. They could’ve burned cap space this summer on average players as an emotional reaction to you-know-who’s departure. But Grant doesn’t – and won’t – operate that way. He will be unemotional and methodical, which is how Cavs fans should want him to be. The addition of Griffin, the former Suns executive, gives Cleveland a keen and connected personnel man to team with Grant; it has the makings of one of the finest front-office tandems in the league.

Glaring weakness: Who’s going to score, defend, perform chase-down blocks, sell tickets, toss talc, pose for idiotic pregame mock celebratory productions, star in hour-long reality TV shows stabbing his hometown in the back, and generally just save the world? Someday, someone besides you-know-who.

Posted on: December 30, 2009 11:16 pm
Edited on: December 31, 2009 12:20 am
 

Hawks plan to protest shot clock error (UPDATE)

The Atlanta Hawks plan to file a game protest after the shot clock failed to reset in the final two minutes of their 106-101 loss in Cleveland on Wednesday night.

After Cleveland's Mo Williams shot an air ball with 1:56 left and the Cavs trailing 99-98, the Cleveland scoring crew failed to reset the shot clock to 24 seconds. Mike Bibby dribbled across halfcourt and passed to Josh Smith, who lost the ball in the lane as the abbreviated shot clock was winding down. The Cavs went back the other way and scored on Anderson Varejao's putback of a Williams miss to take a 100-99 lead with 1:31 left. The Cavs eventually won on Varejao's first career 3-pointer, which made it 104-101 with 17.2 seconds left. The shot was reviewed and correctly upheld via replay, which confirmed that Varejao had both feet behind the 3-point line.

UPDATE: Here's the YouTube clip of the shot-clock sequence so you can decide for yourself whether the Hawks have a case.

The Hawks were involved in the rare instance when a game protest was granted by the league office stemming from their 117-111 overtime victory over Miami on Dec. 19, 2007. Commissioner David Stern found that the Hawks' scoring crew had incorrectly disqualified Miami's Shaquille O'Neal for his sixth personal foul, when in fact, it was only his fifth. The teams had to replay the final 51.9 seconds of the game, and the Hawks were fined $50,000 for violating NBA rules.

The teams replayed the end of the protested game on March 8, 2008 -- without O'Neal, who'd been traded to Phoenix by that point. Neither team scored in the replayed 51.9 seconds, and it went in the books as a 114-111 Atlanta victory.

It was the first game protest granted by the NBA since 1982.

Teams protesting regular season games have 48 hours to file the protest with the league office. The other team then has five business days to contest the protest, and the league office has five business days from that point to render a decision, according to NBA procedures. As in the Hawks-Heat scenario, if the protest is granted, the remedy would be to replay the end of the game from the point when the scoring error occurred.

UPDATE: It's difficult to predict how the NBA will handle this protest, but the Hawks clearly have an uphill battle considering how rarely they are granted.

The league came down on the Hawks for the O'Neal situation, in part, because the error was not corrected once the stat crew pointed it out. On one hand, the shot-clock sequence Wednesday night came at a critical juncture in the game -- the very moment when momentum swung to the Cavs' favor. On the other, it seems unrealistic to think that possession could change nearly 200 times in a basketball game without some type of clock error. And in this case, the Hawks would've had a better case if they'd gotten off a quality shot on the trip in question. Smith simply lost the ball in traffic, and it wasn't evident that he was in a hurry or was even aware of the shot clock situation. 

The NBA clearly doesn't want to open the floodgates for protests that would muddle the schedule with do-overs. But with awareness so high about getting every call correct, it's hard to ignore an error that very well might have affected the outcome of a game.

Posted on: December 20, 2008 7:59 pm
 

Carter on Cavs' radar?

An item on a competing sports and entertainment network's website stated that the Nets' Vince Carter is on the Cavaliers' list of players they're interested in acquiring.

Intriguing. Juicy, even. Big name, prominent team, a potentially blockbuster trade. Alas, it's just another rumor.

I spoke Saturday with an executive-level source who has knowledge of both teams' activities, and he reported that the Cavs and Nets have not discussed a Carter swap in any form. In fact, the Nets and Cavs haven't discussed any type of trade in a month and a half.

Numerous teams around the league will be calling Cleveland between now and the Feb. 19 trade deadline, so be prepared for more rumors -- both substantiated and unsubstantiated -- to fly. The reason is the Cavs have two players they need to make decisions on -- Wally Szczerbiak, whose $13 million expiring contract is a valuable chip, and Anderson Varejao, who has a player option for 2009-10.

 

Posted on: December 18, 2008 10:47 am
 

Marion trade rumor shown on Pat Riley's TV

It was just another day in Shawn Marion's trade rumor-driven world. That is, until he attended the team Christmas party at Pat Riley's house, where the latest trade rumor was televised on the news scroll of a popular, widely viewed entertainment and sports programming network.

Though a person with direct knowledge of the situation said Miami and Cleveland haven't held any trade discussions in months, reports of a possible deal sending Marion to Cleveland for Wally Szczerbiak and Anderson Varejao were nonetheless the talk of the party at Riley's house Tuesday night.

 "What am I going to do? I'm going to sit there and panic every time somebody says something?" said Marion, whose $17.8 million expiring contract -- and 12.4-point scoring average -- will have him front-and-center of trade talk between now and the Feb. 19 deadline.

 

Posted on: December 17, 2008 11:24 am
 

Marion believes he will finish season in Miami

From the Miami Herald, Shawn Marion believes that despite the latest round of trade speculation, he'll finish the season in Miami.

The Herald quotes two sources saying that a potential trade sending Marion, on the last year of a contract at $17.2 million, to Cleveland for Wally Szczerbiak and Anderson Varejao, isn't imminent. A person with knowledge of the situation told CBSSports.com Tuesday that Miami and Cleveland haven't engaged in any trade discussions in months.

That said, the deal has the potential to make too much sense for both teams to dismiss the idea that it might resurface. A lot can happen between now and the Feb. 19 trade deadline.

 

 

Posted on: December 16, 2008 3:40 pm
 

Marion to Cavs makes sense ... but not now

Shawn Marion to the Cavs? LeBron James no doubt would be thrilled, and Cleveland would be loaded up like never before to make a title run before the clock ticks down to July 1, 2010. But a person directly involved in the situation said Tuesday that Cleveland and Miami "haven't had a trade discussion of any kind in months."

The proposed trade reported by Yahoo! Sports would've sent Anderson Varejao and Wally Szczerbiak to Miami for Marion, whose $17.2 million deal expires after the season. Szczerbiak's $13 million also is expiring, but the Cavs would clear Varejao's $6.2 million player option off the books next summer. It's an intriguing proposal for both teams, although an agent who would be involved in such a transaction had no indication Tuesday that anything was imminent.

The Heat clearly are not smitten with the idea of maxing out Marion, who would instantly make the Cavs a lethal threat to the Celtics' repeat hopes. Cleveland could view it as a rental, or could extend Marion after the season if they believe LBJ would approve. The Cavs already have plenty of cap space in 2010 to re-sign LeBron and a top-tier running mate such as Chris Bosh. But clearing Varejao's contract would make Cleveland a player in free agency next summer, when Carlos Boozer (player option) and Kobe Bryant (early termination) could be free. Miami would be in great cap shape, too, assuming Varejao declines his player option.

The interesting question for the Cavs is whether or not they should gamble when the team is 20-4 and seemingly capable of going toe-to-toe with Boston in the Eastern Conference Finals. Cavs GM Danny Ferry believes the roster is talented enough to contend as-is, but Marion would be a difference maker. And while Varejao does all the little things -- including flopping to draw offensive fouls -- Marion wouldn't be a liability on the defensive end because he's versatile enough to guard the post and perimeter.

 

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com