Tag:Andrei Kirilenko
Posted on: September 27, 2010 12:36 pm
Edited on: September 27, 2010 10:39 pm
 

Nuggets' indecision 'a huge puzzle' (UPDATE)

Talks of a blockbuster trade that would send Carmelo Anthony to the Nets gained momentum Monday before getting bogged down again in the Nuggets' indecision, two people familiar with the negotiations told CBSSports.com.

One person briefed on the complicated, four-team talks described them as "moving along" after a weekend of inertia fueled by Denver's inability to make a final decision on trading its franchise player -- and Anthony's desire to make sure he was doing the right thing by signing off on a deal to New Jersey.

"Talking and waiting," was how another person with knowledge of the negotiations described them.

On Sunday, a person connected to the talks told CBSSports.com that there was a "more than 50 percent chance" Anthony is traded in the next 24-48 hours. The momentum gained Monday bolstered that prediction, with most of the focus on the original framework of the deal also involving the Bobcats and Jazz.

But as the discussions dragged on, frustration with the Nuggets' handling of the negotiations was building among the other executives involved in the deal. One person who has been briefed on the talks described the Denver team of GM Masai Ujiri, executive Josh Kroenke and adviser Bret Bearup -- consummating their first trade together -- as "a huge puzzle." A second person familiar with the discussions expressed frustration with "a lot of contingencies" the Nuggets were trying to place on the deal, and a third described the Nuggets as indecisive and hesitant.

Jazz GM Kevin O'Connor, speaking at Utah's media day , said, "If you're going to make that trade, it would've been done Friday."

The Nuggets have done this slow dance before, under different leadership, but the meandering pace of these trade talks has some execs marveling at how some things in Denver haven't changed.

As part of the scenario being discussed for weeks and tabled over the weekend while Denver executives strategized privately and sought other offers, the Nets would send No. 3 pick Derrick Favors and two first-round picks to Denver for Anthony. The Bobcats would get Devin Harris from New Jersey and send Boris Diaw to Utah, which could send Andrei Kirilenko and his $17.8 million expiring contract to Denver. Quinton Ross would go from New Jersey to Utah.

That basic structure "hasn't changed" since Friday, said one person who has been briefed on the talks.

As discussions progressed, however, sources confirmed reports that Utah was trying to get a second-round pick in the deal, and Charlotte was asking for cash or a pick for its involvement. Those issues were "being discussed" Monday, one of the sources said. At the same time, frustration was growing for Utah and Charlotte, although one executive with a hand in the negotiations pointed out that both teams would have something significant to lose if the deal fell apart: Charlotte needs a starting point guard, and Utah needs luxury-tax relief.

The Nuggets, who accelerated trade talks in response to ominous predictions of problems that would result from Anthony staying in Denver, convened for media day Monday -- and Anthony was there. Though that hurdle was far from a drop-dead deadline, it was nonetheless ideal from the Nuggets' standpoint to make considerable progress before being saddled with controversy and drama.

There was no hiding how torn Denver officials were Monday between trying to find a better deal and hoping that Anthony's camp could be persuaded to tamp down its trade rhetoric. After spending the weekend trying to determine if a better deal would emerge -- or if better assets could be acquired from the three other teams currently involved -- the Nuggets reached a tipping point in the most difficult decision a franchise ever has to make. That is one reason Denver tried to explore every angle and wanted to meet in person with Anthony before agreeing to trade him.

One avenue Denver pursued recently in the trade discussions was getting Gerald Wallace from Charlotte in the deal, a person involved in the talks told CBSSports.com Monday. But the Bobcats have insisted throughout that they'd only trade Wallace if it meant getting Anthony in the deal, and that's not happening based on Anthony's lack of interest in playing in Charlotte. For the same reason, Denver's interest in the Sixers' Andre Iguodala is a non-starter.

A package featuring No. 2 pick Evan Turner, Thaddeus Young, the expiring contract of Jason Kapono and draft picks -- explored previously here -- also fails to pass the Melo test.

As the Nets' discussions continued to develop Monday, sources say one team that is more involved than commonly thought is the Knicks. After New York fell short in its pursuit of LeBron James and/or Dwyane Wade, it would be devastating for the Knicks to watch Anthony go to their cross-river rival -- especially since that rival is moving into the city limits to Brooklyn in two years. While Knicks president Donnie Walsh has been in far from panic mode, he has been "working every angle" in an effort to get back in the game with Anthony, according to a rival executive familiar with Walsh's approach.

"He's the master," the executive said. "I'll put it this way: If there's any way to get something done that he feels good about, he'll get it done. He'll leave no stone unturned."






Posted on: September 26, 2010 7:14 pm
 

Nuggets exploring their options

There was renewed hope Sunday that a four-team trade sending Carmelo Anthony to the Nets was still alive, with the framework of the deal possibly expanding to include additional players and possibly another team, CBSSports.com has learned.

But a weekend of inertia continued to frustrate the three teams Denver hastily recruited to accelerate Anthony’s departure, with executives standing firm in their belief that the longer the delay, the stronger the chance that the precarious structure of the trade could fall apart.

Among New Jersey, Utah and Charlotte, sources say least concerned were the Nets, who understandably have “no deadline” to pull off the blockbuster, franchise-shaping deal. The problem is with the pieces volunteered by the Jazz and Bobcats, who’d benefit the least from the arrangement and want to avoid unnecessary distractions heading into training camp this week. Charlotte’s role in the existing deal would be to send Boris Diaw to Utah and receive Devin Harris from the Nets, while Utah would send Andre Kirilenko to the Nuggets, who’d get No. 3 pick Derrick Favors and two first-round picks from New Jersey. Quinton Ross also would go from New Jersey to Utah.

“No one wants to go to camp with drama,” said one executive not involved in the pursuit of Anthony, who ignited the sweepstakes by refusing to sign a three-year, $65 million extension while his high-powered agents, Leon Rose and William Wesley, pushed hard all summer for a trade.

Sources say the Nuggets have been taking full advantage of the holding pattern in talks to listen to offers from other teams – though executives with knowledge of the situation do not believe a better offer has presented itself. The Bulls and Clippers, two teams with attractive assets and a realistic chance of persuading Anthony to sign an extension with them, have not progressed beyond the packages they initially brought to Denver’s attention. Some signs Sunday pointed to the revival of talks between Denver and Philadelphia with Andre Iguodala going to the Nuggets, but there was no signal from Anthony’s camp that he’d softened in his opposition to bringing his talents to South Philly.

Another player the Nuggets have targeted as a viable asset to recover in an Anthony trade, Anderson Varejao, remains a long shot for the same reason; Anthony isn’t going to Cleveland, the city that superstar LeBron James fled in July as though the Cuyahoga River were on fire.

So on the second front, the Nuggets are trying to determine whether another player within the current framework of the deal or even a fifth team would be able to further sweeten the reward for parting with the organization’s best player in two decades. The Nets are said to have “exhausted” the options available to the Nuggets in the current structure of the trade, with one possibility having Harris going to Denver instead of Charlotte. What Nuggets officials are weighing there, according to an executive with knowledge of the talks, is whether Harris might have more value as a trade chip than Kirilenko – an indication that Denver would view itself as being in full-blown cost-cutting and rebuilding mode without Anthony in the fold. Kirilenko, with a $17.8 million expiring contract, would seem to have more value than Harris, who is owed $27 million over the next three years. The Nuggets have not asked the Bobcats for Gerald Wallace, according to one executive familiar with the negotiations.

With nothing happening to push the discussions any closer to completion or extinction, Anthony could very well still be a Nugget during media day Monday at the Pepsi Center, which brings the saga to its next critical turning point. Anthony’s presence around the team will give GM Masai Ujiri his first chance to sit down face-to-face with the superstar and hear directly from him on his level of comfort with the best offer the team has received to move him.

Coach George Karl, whose ability to influence Anthony’s position should not be underestimated, also will have a chance to be in the room. This way, Nuggets officials will be able to hear first-hand from Anthony where he stands on the direction of the organization and his comfort level with joining a New Jersey team that would still be one major piece away from championship contention after adding Anthony. To this point, the vast majority of communication with Denver officials has come from Anthony’s advisers with Creative Artists Agency – most notable Rose and Wesley, who staunchly favor a trade to pastures they argue are greener than in Denver.

What the Nuggets are hoping, at the risk of jeopardizing the best offer they may get, is that Anthony’s angst will subside once he’s back with the only team he’s known during his seven-year career. He may conclude that he wouldn’t be much better off somewhere else.
Posted on: September 25, 2010 8:49 pm
Edited on: September 26, 2010 1:51 am
 

Melo deal in holding pattern

In the 24 hours since Nuggets general manager Masai Ujiri and executive Josh Kroenke left New York City, where face-to-face negotiations with Nets officials rapidly transformed the Carmelo Anthony saga into a game of who blinks first, the discussions have stalled, according to officials familiar with the situation.

Two people with knowledge of the negotiations described them Saturday as stagnant, with a third person going so far as to say talks were "still developing." Anthony himself, watching the UCLA-Texas game from his Los Angeles home, was said to be telling friends simply that there was nothing new to report.

No news is ever good news with a trade this big and complicated, with stakes this high. And it appears that Denver's strategy to accelerate Anthony's trade demand into a full-blown poker game, with an unofficial deadline of Monday, could be jeopardizing the potential blockbuster that would send Anthony to the Nets.

"With every day that passes," said one executive not actively pursuing Anthony, "the bigger deals fall apart."

The talks were not there yet Saturday, with one source describing the slow-dancing tactic from Denver simply as "part of getting a deal done." But even management sources who've been confident from the beginning that Anthony would sign off on a trade to New Jersey recognize how many other things could go wrong in a trade of this magnitude.

As things stood Saturday, the Nuggets were still getting No. 3 pick Derrick Favors from the Nets and Andrei Kirilenko from the Jazz. Devin Harris would go from the Nets to the Bobcats, who would send Boris Diaw to Utah. New Jersey also would send two first-round picks to Denver -- its own and Golden State's protected first-round pick in 2012 -- and Quinton Ross to the Jazz. Charlotte continued to balk at sending point guard D.J. Augustin to the Nets, and New Jersey officials were seeking to expand the deal in the pursuit of a point guard to replace Harris.

Multiple executives monitoring the Melo developments believe that publicizing the four-team trade talks was an effort on Denver's part to solicit better offers from other teams. However, the list of teams believing they have a shot at getting Anthony to agree to an extension is short; he's made clear from the beginning that his first choice is New York, with Chicago, the Nets and possibly the Clippers also having a chance.

One team clearly not on Anthony's list, Cleveland, deserves to be mentioned nonetheless because sources indicate that Anderson Varejao is among the players Denver has targeted as an acceptable replacement asset for Anthony. The others are Kirilenko, Andre Iguodala and Gerald Wallace, a person with knowledge of the team's strategy said.

The anticipated avalanche of offers, however, did not appear to be forming Saturday. One team with an outside shot at getting Melo's approval was described by sources as "not trying." Also, an executive on the periphery of the talks described Denver's negotiating stance as "delusional."

Anthony's first choice, the Knicks, have the expiring contract of Eddy Curry and young players to offer, but lack the first-round picks Denver is seeking. However, team president Donnie Walsh is said to be in no frenzy to acquire an attractive first-rounder. Sources say Walsh is playing his own game of poker and is unwilling to jeopardize the progress he's made in rebuilding the Knicks' roster and cap position -- a monumental task over the past 2 1-2 years. He also knows that if Anthony wants to come to New York badly enough, he can arrange that as a free agent after the season.

The team with arguably the most attractive first-round pick to offer -- the Clippers, who own a 2011 first-rounder from Minnesota that is unprotected in 2012 -- were nowhere near the Melo talks Saturday, sources said.

While sources who predicted that completing the structure of the deal would be more difficult than getting Anthony's approval to re-sign with the Nets were validated with Saturday's developments, a significant roadblock on the Anthony front still exists. With Favors being sent to Denver in the proposed deal, leaving center Brook Lopez as the only potential All-Star on the roster besides Anthony, the soon-to-be-ex-Nugget was said to be "worried about going there by himself," according to one executive familiar with the situation.

Thus, a significant aspect of what Anthony is mulling is whether Chris Paul -- a fellow client of Creative Artists Agency's Leon Rose-William Wesley tandem -- would be willing to join him there. Anthony, however, would have to wait until 2012 when Paul can become a free agent. That would coincide with the Nets' move to Brooklyn, but a lot can -- and will -- happen between now and then: a new collective bargaining agreement, possibly a lockout, and two seasons for Anthony in Newark, which is only a few miles from the Seventh Avenue entrance to Madison Square Garden but is really light years away.

 

 
 



Posted on: September 24, 2010 2:20 pm
Edited on: September 25, 2010 11:02 am
 

Melo-to-Nets 'still developing' (UPDATE)


A proposed four-team trade that would send Carmelo Anthony to the Nets gained momentum Friday night, with sources telling CBSSports.com that New Jersey officials have grown confident that Anthony wouldn't block such a deal.

Two executives involved in the complicated discussions among the Nuggets, Nets, Bobcats and Jazz dismissed a published report saying Anthony had already given his approval. That aspect of the transaction, necessary because the Nets won't trade for Anthony unless he agrees to a contract extension, is "the easy part," one of the execs said. The hard part is the structure of the deal, which ran into a couple of roadblocks over the past 48 hours.

One impediment, sources say, is the Bobcats' refusal to include point guard D.J. Augustin in the trade. The Nets, who will be left without a starting point guard with Devin Harris going to Charlotte in the four-team scenario, don't necessarily view that as a deal-breaker. But sources say the Nets, the team that has been most aggressive in its pursuit of Anthony since it became known six weeks ago he wanted out of Denver, are concerned enough that they are continuing their attempts to pry Augustin from the Bobcats. If they're unsuccessful, another option would be to try to bring in another team.

"It could expand," one of the sources said.

UPDATE: As the Nets began two-a-day practices in New Jersey and the Nuggets prepared for media day in 48 hours, one executive involved in the process said he was "not optimistic" the deal would be finalized Saturday. A second executive with knowledge of the negotiations said the transaction was "still developing," adding that Augustin was still not included in the deal.

"There’s a lot of moving parts in there that could cause it to fall apart," said an executive not involved in the negotiations. "There’s no deal breakers in there, though. If that’s what Denver wants for Carmelo -- I don’t think it's much -- but if that's what they want, they can get it done."

That executive, whose team tried without success to get into the Melo sweepstakes, added, "I'm not sure Melo's sold on Jersey. I think he's worried about going there by himself." If that's the case, one of the road blocks could be determining the likelihood that Chris Paul -- who like Anthony has made noise about wanting to be traded this summer and is represented by Creative Artists Agency -- would be inclined to join him as a free agent in 2012, just in time for the Nets' move to Brooklyn.

"That could very well be the sticking point," the executive said.

The execs involved in the trade discussions were not aware of Anthony signing off on being sent to New Jersey, as reported by the New York Daily News, but would not be surprised given the vibes they've gotten previously from Anthony's team of advisers at CAA, including agents Leon Rose and William Wesley.

The Nuggets, Nets, Bobcats and Jazz began discussing the four-way deal "weeks ago," according to one of the people with knowledge of the talks. The Nuggets, trying to take control of the message and the leverage, accelerated matters in the past 48 hours when GM Masai Ujiri and executive Josh Kroenke -- son of owner Stan Kroenke -- flew to the New York area to meet with Nets officials, sources told CBSSports.com. Ujiri and Kroenke left the city Friday without finalizing details of the trade, sources said, but all parties agreed to "keep working on it."

Yahoo! Sports reported that Denver was giving Anthony 48 hours to decide whether he'd agree to an extension and be traded to the Nets or stay in Denver.

The Nuggets would get No. 3 overall pick Derrick Favors from the Nets, who would send Harris to the Bobcats and Quinton Ross to the Jazz. Charlotte, in turn, would send Boris Diaw to Utah, which would send Andrei Kirilenko to the Nuggets. Denver also would get a 2012 first-round pick from the Nets, who got the pick from Golden State. The selection is top-seven protected in 2012 and '13 and top-six protected in '14.

With the framework of the deal now public, the Nuggets can use it to solicit better offers from other teams. The Knicks, for example, have taken a patient approach, believing that Anthony wouldn't find a better situation than waiting until after the season and signing as a free agent with New York -- his first choice. Now, the Knicks may be compelled to reignite previous efforts to locate an attractive first-round pick to send to Denver. Newsday reported that Knicks president Donnie Walsh was taking a wait-and-see approach and was not willing to gut his revamped roster to get Anthony.

At the same time, Anthony has something to think about besides simply wanting out of Denver. He has the possibility of a consolation prize -- playing in the New York market, but doing it in New Jersey for the next two years. Given Anthony's displeasure with the instability in Denver -- including the ousting of GM Mark Warkentien and the resulting departure of George Karl's trusted assistant, Tim Grgurich -- that may be a more attractive option. If nothing else, the Nuggets are forcing him to make that call now, before even stepping foot on the court for training camp. If the tactic works, offers will come flooding in from other teams who are looking to get in the sweepstakes.


Posted on: September 24, 2010 2:20 pm
Edited on: September 25, 2010 11:02 am
 

Melo-to-Nets 'still developing' (UPDATE)


A proposed four-team trade that would send Carmelo Anthony to the Nets gained momentum Friday night, with sources telling CBSSports.com that New Jersey officials have grown confident that Anthony wouldn't block such a deal.

Two executives involved in the complicated discussions among the Nuggets, Nets, Bobcats and Jazz dismissed a published report saying Anthony had already given his approval. That aspect of the transaction, necessary because the Nets won't trade for Anthony unless he agrees to a contract extension, is "the easy part," one of the execs said. The hard part is the structure of the deal, which ran into a couple of roadblocks over the past 48 hours.

One impediment, sources say, is the Bobcats' refusal to include point guard D.J. Augustin in the trade. The Nets, who will be left without a starting point guard with Devin Harris going to Charlotte in the four-team scenario, don't necessarily view that as a deal-breaker. But sources say the Nets, the team that has been most aggressive in its pursuit of Anthony since it became known six weeks ago he wanted out of Denver, are concerned enough that they are continuing their attempts to pry Augustin from the Bobcats. If they're unsuccessful, another option would be to try to bring in another team.

"It could expand," one of the sources said.

UPDATE: As the Nets began two-a-day practices in New Jersey and the Nuggets prepared for media day in 48 hours, one executive involved in the process said he was "not optimistic" the deal would be finalized Saturday. A second executive with knowledge of the negotiations said the transaction was "still developing," adding that Augustin was still not included in the deal.

"There’s a lot of moving parts in there that could cause it to fall apart," said an executive not involved in the negotiations. "There’s no deal breakers in there, though. If that’s what Denver wants for Carmelo -- I don’t think it's much -- but if that's what they want, they can get it done."

That executive, whose team tried without success to get into the Melo sweepstakes, added, "I'm not sure Melo's sold on Jersey. I think he's worried about going there by himself." If that's the case, one of the road blocks could be determining the likelihood that Chris Paul -- who like Anthony has made noise about wanting to be traded this summer and is represented by Creative Artists Agency -- would be inclined to join him as a free agent in 2012, just in time for the Nets' move to Brooklyn.

"That could very well be the sticking point," the executive said.

The execs involved in the trade discussions were not aware of Anthony signing off on being sent to New Jersey, as reported by the New York Daily News, but would not be surprised given the vibes they've gotten previously from Anthony's team of advisers at CAA, including agents Leon Rose and William Wesley.

The Nuggets, Nets, Bobcats and Jazz began discussing the four-way deal "weeks ago," according to one of the people with knowledge of the talks. The Nuggets, trying to take control of the message and the leverage, accelerated matters in the past 48 hours when GM Masai Ujiri and executive Josh Kroenke -- son of owner Stan Kroenke -- flew to the New York area to meet with Nets officials, sources told CBSSports.com. Ujiri and Kroenke left the city Friday without finalizing details of the trade, sources said, but all parties agreed to "keep working on it."

Yahoo! Sports reported that Denver was giving Anthony 48 hours to decide whether he'd agree to an extension and be traded to the Nets or stay in Denver.

The Nuggets would get No. 3 overall pick Derrick Favors from the Nets, who would send Harris to the Bobcats and Quinton Ross to the Jazz. Charlotte, in turn, would send Boris Diaw to Utah, which would send Andrei Kirilenko to the Nuggets. Denver also would get a 2012 first-round pick from the Nets, who got the pick from Golden State. The selection is top-seven protected in 2012 and '13 and top-six protected in '14.

With the framework of the deal now public, the Nuggets can use it to solicit better offers from other teams. The Knicks, for example, have taken a patient approach, believing that Anthony wouldn't find a better situation than waiting until after the season and signing as a free agent with New York -- his first choice. Now, the Knicks may be compelled to reignite previous efforts to locate an attractive first-round pick to send to Denver. Newsday reported that Knicks president Donnie Walsh was taking a wait-and-see approach and was not willing to gut his revamped roster to get Anthony.

At the same time, Anthony has something to think about besides simply wanting out of Denver. He has the possibility of a consolation prize -- playing in the New York market, but doing it in New Jersey for the next two years. Given Anthony's displeasure with the instability in Denver -- including the ousting of GM Mark Warkentien and the resulting departure of George Karl's trusted assistant, Tim Grgurich -- that may be a more attractive option. If nothing else, the Nuggets are forcing him to make that call now, before even stepping foot on the court for training camp. If the tactic works, offers will come flooding in from other teams who are looking to get in the sweepstakes.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com