Tag:Anthony Parker
Posted on: November 7, 2011 9:44 pm
Edited on: November 7, 2011 9:53 pm
 

To vote or not to vote?

NEW YORK -- As the players' union prepared to host representatives from all 30 teams Tuesday, a person with knowledge of the plans told CBSSports.com that executives from the National Basketball Players Association will be open-minded about whether the league's latest proposal should be put to a vote by the full membership.

The primary purpose of the meeting will be to educate player reps about the details and ramifications of the NBA's 50-50 proposal, which commissioner David Stern has told executive director Billy Hunter in writing that he has until 5 p.m. Wednesday to accept or be faced with a far worse offer. Player reps also will be informed of the other options at their disposal if the union rejects the deal and the league forwards what it is calling its "reset" proposal -- which includes a 47 percent share of revenues for the players, a hard salary cap and rollbacks of existing contracts, among other system restraints that are far worse than those in the standing proposal.

But union officials also expect that player reps will have polled their teammates and will present their views as to whether players, as a whole, want to vote on the deal, reject it, or seek a vote to dissolve the union through decertification and take their fight to the federal courts.

"I'm expecting a diversity of opinions, quite frankly," said the person with knowledge of the format for Tuesday's meeting.

This was the case Monday, as players were active in expressing their opinions to their agents and via social media, with the only consensus being that players are divided on what the next steps should be. Some, like Kevin Martin of the Rockets and Steve Blake of the Lakers, are pushing for a vote. Others, like Cavaliers player rep Anthony Parker, say they're opposed to the deal and would vote against it.

Nothing will be known for sure until the player reps meet with union leaders Tuesday. And to some extent, further conversations will be required between the NBPA and NBA negotiators to clear up certain technical aspects of the proposal -- such as a provision the league has asked for to account for a scenario in which player salaries exceed their 50 percent guarantee by more than the 10 percent escrow withholding in the proposal, up from the previous level of eight percent, sources said.

Indeed, while no meetings between the two sides were scheduled as of Monday night, a person with knowledge of the situation told CBSSports.com that NBPA executives were hopeful that further conversations could be scheduled with the league before the Wednesday deadline.

While union president Derek Fisher and outside counsel Jeffrey Kessler excoriated the league's latest proposal after talks broke down early Sunday and executive committee members are not in favor of presenting it to the rank-and-file for a vote, union negotiators believe that some minor tweaks to unresolved system issues could make the deal more palatable. Among the issues, for example, would be permitting teams above the luxury-tax line to execute sign-and-trade transactions -- a detail the two sides are at odds on despite it only occurring five times during the previous six-year agreement.

Union executives will meet at 1 p.m. Tuesday at a Manhattan hotel with player reps, with all 30 teams expected to be represented either by their reps or alternates.







Posted on: December 2, 2010 7:08 pm
 

LeBron comes home ready to play villain

CLEVELAND -- LeBron James strolled into Quicken Loans Arena at 5:35 p.m. ET Thursday night, dressed all in black.

Perfect.

The villain, dressed for the part.

He was all smiles about 2 1-2 hours before his first game in Cleveland since leaving the Cavs to join the Miami Heat in July.

Within minutes, the King was on his former court, putting up a dizzying array of jumpers and working up a sweat while listening to his pregame motivational music through black-and-red ear buds.

After one clockwise rotation around the court, James wiped sweat from his brow and shouted across the court to former teammate J.J. Hickson, whose pregame jumpers weren't falling with quite the regularity as LeBron's.

"Better shoot some ___ layups," James shouted, smiling widely. "Better shoot some ___ layups. Can't make a damn shot."

Hickson continued shooting and smiled, but didn't turn around.

When he was finished with his customary pregame shooting -- for the first time here as an opponent -- James slapped hands with Cavs assistant coach Chris Jent and embraced the man who was James' personal assistant of sorts on former head coach Mike Brown's staff. James also shared embraces with Hickson and Anthony Parker, but did not do his customary pregame media availability.

That break from routine was announced minutes after Heat coach Erik Spoelstra had finished saying that his goal for this extraordinarily hyped game was to "keep it normal."

There was nothing normal about this night.

Spoelstra talked about taking care of "our two brothers," meaning LeBron and Zydrunas Ilgauskas, who joined James in bolting Cleveland for Miami but was expected to receive a warm reception from the sellout crowd of 20,562 -- in stark contrast to the venom directed at James.

"This is an extreme environment tonight, there's no way around it," Spoelstra said in the crowded hallway outside the visiting locker room -- where James would soon be suiting up for the first time in his eight-year career. "So we've got to stay in the moment."

The moment, finally, had arrived.
Posted on: September 21, 2010 3:13 pm
Edited on: September 21, 2010 3:28 pm
 

Preseason Primers: Cavaliers


The misnomer about LeBron James leaving Cleveland is that people thought fans in Northeast Ohio were mad at him for leaving. Wrong. They were mad at him for the way he left. So with the first post-LeBron training camp around the corner, the Cavs’ brass are hoping the fan base is as realistic and patient as they will be as they recover from the Decision and all that it wrought. Internally, the Cavs have moved on. They have a new coach with rebuilding experience (Byron Scott) and a new front-office team with a lot of promise and assets at their disposal (GM Chris Grant and VP of basketball ops David Griffin).

Personnel-wise, no one inside the organization is putting any limits on what this team can do. The bad: They lost LeBron, and simply won’t recover in the short term. The good: They still believe they have the defensive foundation that Mike Brown built, along with enough shooters (Anthony Parker, Mo Williams, Daniel Gibson), former All-Stars (Antawn Jamison) and defensive dynamos (Varejao) to be competitive until the opportunity to pounce on a major personnel upgrade presents itself. Until then, here’s your preseason primer on the Cavs without you-know-who:

Training camp site: Independence, Ohio

Training camp starts: Sept. 28

Key additions: Ramon Sessions (trade), Ryan Hollins (trade), Joey Graham (free agent), Christian Eyenga (draft)

Key subtractions: Shaquille O’Neal (free agent), Delonte West (trade), Zydrunas Ilgauskas (free agent), Sebastian Telfair (trade), plus franchise identity, millions in ticket/merchandise sales, and the very soul of a tortured, doomed sports populace (i.e. some guy named ... oh, never mind).

Likely starting lineup: Williams, PG; Parker, SG; Joey Graham, SF; Jamison, PF; Anderson Varejao, C.

Player to watch: J.J. Hickson. He’s the guy the Cavs refused to give up in any trade scenario for Jamison or Amar’e Stoudemire. With you-know-who out of the picture, Hickson should benefit from increased touches and has a chance to be a bright spot as the otherwise dismal post-you-know-who era begins.

Chemistry check: Williams and Jamison both thought they were coming to Cleveland to win titles with you-know-who. Well, with you-know-who having taken his you-know-whats to South Beach, it will be interesting to watch how these veterans approach a daunting rebuilding project.

Camp battles: Graham, Jamario Moon and Jawad Williams will have a lively competition to replace you-know-who at small forward.

Biggest strength: If you take the glass-half-full approach, this is actually the ideal opportunity for Scott to re-establish a winning culture and instill his usual combination of defense, toughness, up-tempo offense and conditioning without getting pushback from cranky veterans who have grown tired of him. (That comes later.) Also, as difficult as this is for Cavs fans to swallow, the Cavs acquired some very useful assets in the sign-and-trade transaction that ultimately sent you-know-you to Miami. With multiple future first- and second-round picks, expiring contracts and a $14.5 million trade exception, the Cavs are positioned nicely when the right opportunity presents itself. They could’ve burned cap space this summer on average players as an emotional reaction to you-know-who’s departure. But Grant doesn’t – and won’t – operate that way. He will be unemotional and methodical, which is how Cavs fans should want him to be. The addition of Griffin, the former Suns executive, gives Cleveland a keen and connected personnel man to team with Grant; it has the makings of one of the finest front-office tandems in the league.

Glaring weakness: Who’s going to score, defend, perform chase-down blocks, sell tickets, toss talc, pose for idiotic pregame mock celebratory productions, star in hour-long reality TV shows stabbing his hometown in the back, and generally just save the world? Someday, someone besides you-know-who.

Posted on: July 2, 2009 1:26 am
 

Turkoglu not a one-team show

While Hedo Turkoglu is being wined and dined in two time zones by the Portland Trail Blazers, his other potential suitors aren't sitting around waiting for them to kiss each other good night.

The Toronto Raptors, for one, are deliberating what it would take to make Turkoglu an offer that would top the the five-year, $50 million proposal that Portland can offer, as reported early Wednesday by CBSSports.com. According to a person familiar with the situation, the Raptors are mulling whether they would be better off making a pre-emptive strike for Turkoglu -- which would entail renouncing the rights to Shawn Marion, Carlos Delfino, and Anthony Parker -- or trying to keep those players and sign a mid-level free agent. Toronto has yet to offer an extension to 2010 free agent Chris Bosh; that decision is tied to the others. And Turkoglu isn't the only free agent Toronto is considering. League sources indicated early Thursday that the Raptors also were contemplating an offer to restricted free agent David Lee. Any offer to Lee, by definition, would be in the $8-$10 million range so it would test the Knicks' threshold for matching. And Lee's list of potential suitors shrank by one Wednesday when Memphis traded Quentin Richardson to the Clippers for power forward Zach Randolph.

With so many moving parts -- and with Turkoglu having entertained Blazers coach Nate McMillan in Orlando Wednesday night with plans to visit Portland on Thursday -- it is clear that the recruitment of Turkoglu isn't a one-team show. Turkoglu's camp expected Portland to extend its formal offer during the course of Turkoglu's recruiting trip to the Pacific Northwest on Thursday.

If Portland landed Turkoglu, it would be the first big-ticket free-agent signing of GM Kevin Pritchard's reign. While some involved might view Toronto's preparation of a pre-emptive offer as brash or shameless, this is why the negotiating period was created. Free agents may negotiate and consider offers from July 1-7, but can't sign on the dotted line until the league and players association set the salary cap and luxury tax on July 8.


 
Posted on: December 22, 2008 11:48 am
 

Raptors look to deal, but not with N.Y.

The silly season gets sillier by the day. A reasonable, workable trade scenario involving the Knicks and Raptors was floated on Bulls.com by veteran NBA writer Sam Smith -- Stephon Marbury and Eddy Curry to Toronto for Jermaine O'Neal and Anthony Parker. Sounds good. The Knicks get something for Marbury, and J.O.'s monstrous contract comes off the books in time for the 2010 free-agent derby. Only one problem: The Knicks and Raptors haven't discussed a trade in months, according to an executive familiar with both teams' plans.

One thing is clear: Raptors GM Bryan Colangelo is looking to deal. O'Neal isn't fitting in with Toronto, and Colangelo is under tremendous pressure to turn this team around to appease Chris Bosh, who has the all-important player option in 2010. A likely trade chip will be Parker and his $4.6 million expiring contract. Toronto will come up numerous trade scenarios floated and discussed between now and the Feb. 19 deadline, and is all but certain to pull the trigger on something. Just not this one.

Marbury's buyout talks continue to creep forward, but a person with ties to Marbury said he doesn't expect anything to be finalized before January. The Knicks have given Marbury permission to find a deal with another team, but Marbury's representative, Hal Biagas of the NBA Players Association, is playing that side of it close to the vest.

There will be no trade market for Curry, on the books for $31.5 through 2010-11, until he gets on the floor and plays. He hasn't logged a minute since preseason due to a knee injury.

 

 

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com