Tag:Carlos Delfino
Posted on: July 2, 2009 1:26 am

Turkoglu not a one-team show

While Hedo Turkoglu is being wined and dined in two time zones by the Portland Trail Blazers, his other potential suitors aren't sitting around waiting for them to kiss each other good night.

The Toronto Raptors, for one, are deliberating what it would take to make Turkoglu an offer that would top the the five-year, $50 million proposal that Portland can offer, as reported early Wednesday by CBSSports.com. According to a person familiar with the situation, the Raptors are mulling whether they would be better off making a pre-emptive strike for Turkoglu -- which would entail renouncing the rights to Shawn Marion, Carlos Delfino, and Anthony Parker -- or trying to keep those players and sign a mid-level free agent. Toronto has yet to offer an extension to 2010 free agent Chris Bosh; that decision is tied to the others. And Turkoglu isn't the only free agent Toronto is considering. League sources indicated early Thursday that the Raptors also were contemplating an offer to restricted free agent David Lee. Any offer to Lee, by definition, would be in the $8-$10 million range so it would test the Knicks' threshold for matching. And Lee's list of potential suitors shrank by one Wednesday when Memphis traded Quentin Richardson to the Clippers for power forward Zach Randolph.

With so many moving parts -- and with Turkoglu having entertained Blazers coach Nate McMillan in Orlando Wednesday night with plans to visit Portland on Thursday -- it is clear that the recruitment of Turkoglu isn't a one-team show. Turkoglu's camp expected Portland to extend its formal offer during the course of Turkoglu's recruiting trip to the Pacific Northwest on Thursday.

If Portland landed Turkoglu, it would be the first big-ticket free-agent signing of GM Kevin Pritchard's reign. While some involved might view Toronto's preparation of a pre-emptive offer as brash or shameless, this is why the negotiating period was created. Free agents may negotiate and consider offers from July 1-7, but can't sign on the dotted line until the league and players association set the salary cap and luxury tax on July 8.

Posted on: January 8, 2009 6:43 pm

Delfino staying put; Pargo could be available

OREM, Utah -- With former Nets center Nenad Krstic bolting Russia and returning to the NBA with the Oklahoma City Thunder, NBA executives gathered here this week for the annual D-League Showcase have their radar up on others who could follow.

No G.M. should get his hopes up about Carlos Delfino returning to the States this season, according to two people with knowledge of the situation. But the other former NBAer playing in Russia, Jannero Pargo, is a good bet to return to the NBA for the right situation, the people said.

The sources -- one of them a top international scout and the other a person directly involved in NBA front-office dealings -- said Delfino is integral to Khimki BC's plans and loyal to its coach. Essentially, Delfino is committed to the team for the rest of the season and will re-evaluate his options afterward.

Rumblings about rampant interest in Pargo -- such as, for example, from the Lakers -- have been exaggerated, the second source said. But the Knicks -- coached by Mike D'Antoni with a style suitable to Pargo's skills -- are "quite possible" as a landing spot, the person said. Pargo, playing on a one-year deal for Dynamo Moscow, is friendly with Knicks point guard Chris Duhon, and they're both from Slidell, La.

The issue in Russia is that the sagging international economy has caused many teams to pay players late or not at all. The problem with Pargo finding a home back in the NBA is that the veteran's miniumum would be a pay cut. There have been various reports about what Pargo's deal is worth, but one of the sources knowledgeable about his situation said it was $3 million.

If, as expected, the Knicks get a $4.5 million disabled player exception for Cuttino Mobley, they may be inclined to use it for Pargo. They don't have to pay him the entire amount. But whatever they don't pay, they would forefeit because it can't be split among players. Given that the Knicks still have their $1.9 million biannual exception, using the Mobley exception would be better for them because they could save the biannual for next summer.


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