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Tag:New Orleans
Posted on: February 19, 2012 6:54 pm
 

Cuban would support Seattle return

NEW YORK -- Mark Cuban always holds court with the media when his Mavericks make their annual visit to Madison Square Garden. On Sunday, he said he'd support Seattle's efforts to return to the NBA.

"As long as it’s not an expansion team, yes," Cuban said. "... I voted against the move because I thought it was wrong to leave Seattle. I’d be all for a team going back to Seattle. But it would have to be a team that moves. I’d be against any type of expansion."

Plans for a $490 million arena aimed at attracting an NBA and NHL team to Seattle were unveiled this week, with a $290 million commitment from investors led by Seattle native and hedge-fund manager Chris Hansen. The balance of the funds would come from tax revenues generated by the building and rent paid by the teams, according to the plan.

But with the NBA already in a state of overexpansion, the irony for Seattle is that its path back to the NBA would have to entail doing what Oklahoma City did to Seattle in 2008: luring a team from somewhere else. The likely suspects are Sacramento and New Orleans, where both NBA teams are facing uncertain arena situations.

"Teams go in cycles," Cuban said. "When you're at the top of the cycle, like Sacramento when they were winning, they were selling out every game and it was one of the hardest places to play. But it’s really how the market supports the team when you suck."

A vote by the Sacramento City Council is expected by the end of the month on a funding plan for a new downtown arena for the Kings. Sources say the NBA has narrowed its list of potential buyers for the league-owned Hornets to a handful of groups -- possibly two -- that would keep the team in Louisiana. The announcement of a purchase agreement could come soon after All-Star weekend, pending the resolution of talks between the league, Gov. Bobby Jindal's office and the Louisiana legislature on a new arena lease.

"We continue to work with the Hornets to reach a long-term leasing agreement," Frank Collins, Jindal's press secretary, said in a statement provided to CBSSports.com.

Cuban also weighed in on the new collective bargaining agreement, which he helped negotiate as a member of the owners' labor relations committee. Asked when it will be known whether the owners got a good deal or a bad deal, Cuban said, "We'll find out over the next three or four years. We’ll see what happens when we have a chance to opt out of it in six years.

Asked what criteria should be used to evaluate the new CBA, Cuban said, "Are all the teams making money? ... If all the teams have a chance to compete, then you have a better chance of making money. If you have a better chance of retaining your star players, you have a better chance of making money. So they all go hand in hand."
Posted on: December 6, 2011 12:57 pm
Edited on: December 6, 2011 3:06 pm
 

Source: Howard hasn't told Magic what he wants

Dwight Howard has not yet indicated to Orlando management whether he wants to stay with the Magic, request a trade or play out the season and become a free agent, a person directly involved in the organization's planning told CBSSports.com Tuesday.

"Training camp opens the door to everything," said the person, who spoke on condition of anonymity. "I think that will happen very, very soon."

The soap opera of whether Howard stays in Orlando or seeks a trade to the Lakers already has begun in full force, however, and there already has been a casualty. Team executives were apprised via email Tuesday morning that CEO Bob Vander Weide has stepped down and will be replaced by team president Alex Martins. In replacing Vander Weide, 53, whose departure is being characterized as a retirement, Martin's first order of business will be to represent the Magic on the NBA's Board of Governors, which is scheduled to vote on the new collective bargaining agreement Thursday in an electronic ballot.

UPDATE: Whether Vander Weide's departure has anything to do with the owners' labor relations committee -- of which Vander Weide was a member -- signing off on a deal that could actually expedite Howard's departure from Orlando is a matter worthy of consideration. The Magic scheduled a news conference for Wednesday to address Vander Weide's departure, but Vander Weide admitted Tuesday that he did, in fact, call Howard at 1 a.m. earlier this week after "a couple of glasses of wine" -- a conversation in which the executive reportedly urged the star to stay in Orlando.

The person familiar with the Magic's strategy said Tuesday that, while Howard has yet to verbalize what he wants, the All-Star center has "deep roots here" and has previously expressed that "this is where he'd like to fulfill his career."

"He wants to win," the person said. "That's on his mind intensely."

While Howard has never publicly expressed a desire to leave Orlando, it has been known among people in his inner circle for months that his preference is to play for the Lakers. The only way he's getting to that L.A. team would be via a trade, and the Lakers -- with Andrew Bynum, Pau Gasol and Lamar Odom -- are one of the few teams in the league with enough assets to pull it off.

The new rules set to be approved by the players and owners this week have cut off some of the avenues for superstars looking to leave small markets for big markets -- but some of those rules actually increase the pressure on the home team to make a decision to trade such a player sooner than in the past. The extension Orlando can offer Howard -- same as New Orleans can offer Chris Paul -- falls short of what each could each get as an unrestricted free agent come July 1. And since they can no longer get maximum contract length and raises via a sign-and-trade, their teams don't have that avenue as a fallback option.

"I don't think he knows what he's going to do at this point," the person familiar with the Magic's strategy said. "I'm not sure anybody does. It's impossible to predict."

The overwhelming opinion in central Florida -- which in 1996 saw Shaquille O'Neal flee Orlando to sign with the Lakers as a free agent -- is for Howard to let his intentions be known sooner than later.

"Don't drag us out," the person said. "Tell us what you want, so we can react with facts, not theories and guesses."
Posted on: December 6, 2010 7:42 pm
 

Hornets officially on life support in New Orleans

If any entrepreneurs out there are in the market for a failing business that is going to shut down operations in a few months for a work stoppage, David Stern would like you to come forward with your best offer.

And if you'd like to keep the business in New Orleans, where things were so bad the previous owners ran out of money and credit operating it, all the better.

Oh, did we mention? Bidding starts at $300 million.

The future of the NBA in New Orleans, one of America's finest and star-crossed sports destinations, took a definite turn toward life support Monday when Stern announced that the league is stepping in to save the Hornets from themselves. The question now is: Who, if anyone, will come forward with the deep pockets and patience to keep the team in Louisiana?

The best way to answer that question is to ask yourself: If you had $300 million, is that how you would spend it?

Despite Stern's insistence Monday that the league stepping in to buy 100 percent of the Hornets from owners George Shinn and Gary Chouest was "the best opportunity for the franchise to remain in New Orleans for the long term," it's hard to see how the NBA gets from here to there.

"This was the most stabilizing force for the team in New Orleans that we could come up with," Stern said Monday.

In other words, this was the best of all available options -- especially if you consider that this was the only option.

Despite a compelling team with marketable superstar in Chris Paul who has orchestrated the best start in franchise history, the Hornets remain among the worst teams in the NBA in attendance. In fact, they are seriously in danger of triggering a clause that would allow the team to break its lease with the state if they fail to average 14,214 fans per game until Jan. 31. Even if that happens, a prospective buyer who wants to move the team presumably would still be faced with a relocation fee. That means the owner of the team -- the 29 other NBA teams -- would theoretically get less money in a sale to someone who wants to move it to Kansas City than from someone who wants to keep it in New Orleans.

But that's short-term math. And the long-term interests of the NBA are now more involved in the sale of the Hornets than ever before. Regardless of what changes are made to the league's revenue-sharing scheme in conjunction with a new collective bargaining agreement, it clearly is in nobody's interests to operate a team in a market where it is doomed to lose money forever.

That means there are three choices: 1) find someone (or a group of investors) in New Orleans who have so much money that they don't care about losing millions annually on a basketball team; 2) find international investors who, a la Mikhail Prokhorov, are willing to pay a premium for a piece of the American basketball business; or 3) find someone capable of moving the team somewhere else.

Option 2 would be fine, except remember: Prokhorov's purchase of the Nets was contingent on the move to Brooklyn being finalized. The Russian billionaire wanted no part of owning a team in East Rutherford or Newark. Though Stern said the protracted talks between Shinn and Chouest meant the Hornets were never thoroughly shopped to other potential owners in New Orleans, it tests the limits of credulity that another suitable New Orleans buyer is out there somewhere.

This point is proved by Stern's own statement Monday that it was "possible, if not likely" that the Hornets would've been sold to an owner who would've relocated them if not for the NBA stepping in. The test of the league's staying power in New Orleans begins in about a week, when the Board of Governors is expected to approve the NBA's bailout by an overwhelming margin.

"We're not in any hurry," Stern said.

Despite reports to the contrary, Stern said Chouest never raised the specter of a lockout among the reasons he decided not to go forward with purchasing Shinn's remaining 65 percent of the team. At this point, it hardly matters. The Hornets are the NBA's problem now, and Stern said it's likely that a sale won't be completed until a new CBA and revenue-sharing model are implemented.

In the meantime, everyone involved has good intentions and it's commendable to give this franchise the liquidity it needs to operate in New Orleans at least for the rest of this season. If a long-term solution can be achieved that keeps the team in Louisiana, that would be ideal. Then again, it would've been ideal to keep the SuperSonics in Seattle, too.

For a lesson in how money trumps idealism, look no farther than the Sonics' move from Seattle to Oklahoma City. According to NBA turnstile data, the Sonics brought in $457,863 in gate receipts per game in their last season in Seattle. In 2008-09, the Thunder's first year in Oklahoma City, that figure ballooned to $1,122,109. Since then, with support from the Oklahoma City business community and the inventive front-office maneuverings of GM Sam Presti, the Thunder have established themselves as a model organization -- thriving both on and off the court in a small market.

Here's hoping that two years from now, the same can be said for the Hornets. But it's difficult to see how the NBA gets from here to there in New Orleans.
Posted on: February 8, 2010 11:13 pm
 

Vince Carter is on the Magic?

Apparently, the Magic have acquired Vince Carter. I hadn't noticed -- until Monday night.

Let's not get too carried away with Carter's incredible display against the Hornets -- 48 points, 34 in the second half, and only three shy of his career high. This is not what the Magic had in mind when they pre-empted Hedo Turkoglu's departure by trading for Carter. They expected what they'd gotten for most of the season until now -- a former All-Star who is willing to settle into a secondary role behind Dwight Howard.

But you have to believe it was nice for Stan Van Gundy to witness this unexpected development in the Magic's 123-117 victory over New Orleans. It won't happen often, but when the Magic are slogging their way through the playoffs in a few months, getting sick to death of listening to Van Gundy yell at them about defense with that raspy voice of his, at least they'll know this: Vince Carter is still capable of taking over a game. On occasion, he is still unguardable.

Carter had settled into a mostly pedestrian existence in Orlando, deferring to younger teammates with more bounce in their legs. He hadn't been this good all year, by a lot. He hadn't warranted being a Twitter trending topic since before Twitter was invented.

I can confidently say that 48 points will be his season high; he won't do this again. But the fact that he showed that he can is every bit as important. When the Magic play Cleveland, Boston, Atlanta, or whomever else gets in the way come May and June, their opponent will have to defend Carter as though he will do that again.
 
That's why Carter will be better for the Magic in the playoffs than Turkoglu would've been. You saw merely a glimpse of his worth Monday night, and a glimpse is all it takes.




 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com