Tag:Pacers
Posted on: February 10, 2011 8:41 pm
Edited on: February 10, 2011 9:31 pm
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Allen breaks Miller's 3-point record

BOSTON -- Ray Allen broke Reggie Miller's career 3-point record Thursday night, hitting his 2,561st with 1:48 left in the first quarter against the Lakers Thursday night.

After tying the mark with 4:14 left in the first, Allen set up on the right wing in transition off a Lakers turnover and received a pass from Rajon Rondo. Allen hit the open 3-pointer and backpedaled down the court as TD Bank Garden erupted in a standing ovation. With Miller sitting courtside as an announcer for TNT, Allen became the NBA's career 3-point king against the Celtics' archrivals in a nationally televised game.

During a stoppage in play, Allen jogged to the broadcast table to embrace Miller, who made 2,560 3-pointers during an 18-year career -- all with the Indiana Pacers. Allen then went to the Celtics' bench and hugged Celtics coach Doc Rivers and assistant coach Lawrence Frank while Rondo shot free throws.

Allen shook hands with his longtime nemesis, Lakers star Kobe Bryant, who offered a wink and a nod. When the quarter ended, with the Celtics leading 27-20, Allen made the rounds again -- embracing his mother and kissing his wife and children, hugging Miller again, and soaking in a raucous ovation as a congratulatory montage was shown on the arena scoreboard.

"I think all of us who play sports want to put ourselves in a position where you can feel that kind of adulation," Allen said before the game, in the moments leading up to his record-breaking moment. "I know why I'm here. it required a lot of blood and sweat."

Standing in front of the Celtics' bench while a highlight film of his biggest shots through the years played during a second-quarter timeout, Allen's typically stoic demeanor finally cracked as he chomped nervously on his customary gum. Before the game, Allen said he wasn't sure how he'd react.

"I don't try to predict my emotions," he said.

Allen, 35, broke the record in his 15th season and 1,074th game; Miller did it over 18 seasons in 1,839 games. Miller said Allen breaking his record was "great for the game of basketball."

"When people ask me, ‘You’ve got to be a little bit upset or bitter,' why?" Miller said. "First of all, all records are made to be broken. I had a conversation with Ray earlier tonight and he was like, ‘When I was a rookie and I came to Market Square Arena and I saw you for three, three and a half hours before (the game) shooting, that’s how I wanted to patent my game.’ I’m just so happy for him because this is one of the best guys. He’s so humble, he’s so giving, he’s a great family man and I’m excited. ... This is great. You know why? We're focusing and talking about shooting. No one talks about shooting anymore.”
Posted on: February 8, 2011 1:31 pm
 

Reggie Miller sticks up for small markets

As the superstar exodus to greener pastures and glitzier cities continues in the NBA, Reggie Miller rode to the rescue of the small market Tuesday. 

In TNT's pre-All-Star conference call, Miller said a franchise tag to curb player movement will be "tough" to implement in collective bargaining. But if that's what it takes to keep stars in small markets -- Miller played his entire 18-year career in Indiana -- he's all for it. 

"I was disappointed when LeBron left and went to Miami," Miller said. "I'm not faulting him, because obviously this is America and people change jobs and occupations and locations all the time. But for a guy that's been in a small market for 18 years, I just love when stars and superstars -- and you had the biggest superstars in our league in terms of name recognition in LeBron in a small market -- I didn’t think overall that helps the brand. Therefore, I hope Deron Williams stays in Utah and Chris Paul stays in New Orleans. It's good to have superstars in smaller markets because it helps the brand." 

Fellow Turner Sports broadcaster Kevin McHale, who famously traded Kevin Garnett from Minnesota to Boston in 2007, called the franchise tag an "interesting concept." Depending on how it's implemented, a franchise tag would either give teams cap relief to help them retain a star player, further restrict star players' movement, or both. 

"There's something to that," McHale said. "It gives the team that drafts a guy and develops a guy more of an opportunity to hold onto the player. I agree having the talent distributed throughout the whole NBA is much better for the game as whole. If you win, they'll want to play in different cities, no matter if it's Oklahoma City or New York City. If you're winning, they're going to want to go there and be part of it." 

Whether the owners can get such an onerous request past the union without a fight? Good luck. 

"They're going to have to get the players' association to buy into that," McHale said. 

The prospect of a franchise tag in a new CBA plays directly into the future of Carmelo Anthony, who is seeking a trade yet is concerned about losing money by passing on a three-year, $65 million extension that could be less lucrative in the new labor agreement. If the Nuggets decide to keep Anthony, part of their motivation would be having solid knowledge that they'd be in a position to retain Anthony with a franchise tag after the new deal is ratified. Anthony's countermove, obviously, would simply be to opt out of his $18.5 million contract for next season. That game of chess is likely to unfold all the way down to the Feb. 24 trade deadline.
Posted on: November 4, 2010 10:51 am
 

Sixers' Collins not expected to miss more games

Sixers coach Doug Collins is not expected to miss more games due to a vertigo condition that forced him to leave the bench for the second half of Philadelphia's 101-75 victory over Indiana on Wednesday night, a person familiar with the situation told CBSSports.com.

Collins, whose team is struggling out of the gate at 1-4, was treated for a concussion after hitting his head in a fall during preseason and was diagnosed with vertigo. The latest issue with Collins, according to a source, is that he has not been taking his medication on game days because it makes him tired. The effects of vertigo returned after Collins didn't take his medicine for two consecutive days due to back-to-back games against Washington and Indiana. With an adjustment in dosage, Collins is expected to be on the bench for the Sixers' game Friday night against the Cavaliers.



Posted on: July 15, 2010 2:25 pm
 

Livingston gets another chance in Charlotte

LAS VEGAS -- One of the feel-good stories of 2009 Summer League was Shaun Livingston getting another chance with the Oklahoma City Thunder. On Thursday, Livingston was finalizing a three-year deal with the Charlotte Bobcats that will give him his best opportunity yet to revive his once-promising career.

Livingston has agreed to a three-year deal with the Bobcats, with the third year partially guaranteed, two people familiar with the agreement confirmed to CBSSports.com. Livingston, still only 24 as he continues the long road back from a catastrophic knee injury suffered in 2007 with the Clippers, is expected to get a chance to compete with D.J. Augustin to be the Bobcats' starting point guard, one of the people with knowledge of the circumstances said.

In any event, Livingston's signing -- which was not yet official as of Thursday afternoon, the sources said -- would seem to preclude the Bobcats from pursuing point guard Ramon Sessions, who is expected to be dealt by the Timberwolves. As Royce Young pointed out in the Facts & Rumors blog , Indiana is a logical landing spot for Sessions, the odd man out amid Minnesota GM David Kahn's latest bolstering of the point-guard position with his signing of Luke Ridnour to a four-year, $16 million deal.

Livingston, the No. 4 pick of the 2004 draft, averaged 11.3 points and 5.8 assists in 36 games with Oklahoma City and Washington last season. In 26 games (18 starts) with the Wizards, he averaged 13.0 points, 6.2 assists and shot 54 percent from the field.
Posted on: March 18, 2010 1:15 pm
Edited on: March 19, 2010 8:11 am
 

Jackson could be on radar for Clips, Nets


Mark Jackson’s decision to sign with an agent this week has not gone unnoticed in coaching circles, where it is believed that the former All-Star point guard and current broadcaster finally will get his chance to roam the sidelines as an NBA head coach. 

Jackson did not employ an agent when he was in the running for head coaching jobs in New York and Minnesota last summer and Phoenix in 2008, preferring to deal one-on-one with team executives. Jackson, 44, got passed over for all three jobs but is expected to be in demand once the NBA’s coaching carousel starts spinning at the end of April. 

“Despite the economy and the potential work stoppage, there’s going to be more movement than we’ve seen in the past,” said one person involved in the coaching business. 

The two most sensible landing spots for the ABC/ESPN commentator are the Clippers and Nets, according to sources familiar with both situations. Jackson lives in Los Angeles and is a native New Yorker. Despite turmoil in both organizations, the situations will be extremely attractive for top coaching candidates this summer. 

One person familiar with how coaching candidates view the Clippers job described the team as being in the “best shape in the league” payroll-wise and talent-wise. There are signs that frugal owner Donald M. Sterling, who demoted and then fired former coach and GM Mike Dunleavy in recent weeks, could be ready to open his notoriously tight checkbook for a high-profile name like Jackson. The Nets, according to sources, would be viewed as more of a longer-term growth opportunity for Jackson, who has no previous coaching experience. But the cap space to sign a max free agent, the possibility of landing presumed No. 1 pick John Wall, and the team’s eventual move to a new arena in Brooklyn – one borough over from Jackson’s native Queens – might overshadow the fact that the Nets (7-61) are on their way to one of the worst seasons in NBA history. 

Another situation that bears watching is Indiana, where Jackson enjoyed some of his best years as a player. Former Pacers GM Donnie Walsh, who also is represented by Jackson’s new agent, Steve Kauffman, thinks highly of Jackson and still holds sway over Pacers owner Herb Simon when it comes to transformational decisions such as a coaching hire. If the Pacers decide to dismiss Jim O’Brien after the season for a new voice, and Jackson’s communication skills and popularity within the organization will be among his biggest strengths. 

Jackson’s decision to sign with Kauffman Sports Management made official his well-known private desire to leave the broadcast booth for a chance to coach. Sources familiar with Jackson’s thinking say he is cognizant of the role his lack of experience would play and is determined to recruit the most experienced assistants possible to help him make the transition. Philadelphia, Chicago, New Orleans and Golden State are among the other teams that could be contemplating coaching changes this summer.
Posted on: July 11, 2009 6:28 pm
 

Raptors signing Jarrett Jack to offer sheet

LAS VEGAS -- The Toronto Raptors are on the verge of signing Pacers restricted free agent Jarrett Jack to an offer sheet, CBSSports.com has learned.

Terms of the deal aren't yet apparent, but Jack, 25, would be a younger, faster replacement for Anthony Parker, who has agreed to a two-year deal with Cleveland. As a versatile combo guard, Jack would back up point guard Jose Calderon and also see time at the scoring guard spot. Once Jack signs the offer sheet, the Pacers have seven days to match.


 
 
 
 
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