Tag:Tyson Chandler
Posted on: December 21, 2010 8:14 pm
 

Sources: Mavs poised to enter Melo chase

The Dallas Mavericks are plotting an aggressive push to acquire Carmelo Anthony, even if they don’t get assurances that the three-time All-Star would agree to a contract extension as part of the trade, league sources told CBSSports.com. 

Despite his team’s emergence as one of the powers of the Western Conference -- and, as Dallas proved Monday night in Miami, the whole league -- owner Mark Cuban is said to be not only willing to take a chance on Anthony, but eager to steal him from the Nets, who are owned by his billionaire rival, Mikhail Prokhorov. In a deal that would provide Denver with little more than future savings, the Mavs are planning what one rival executive described as a “hard” push. 

The Mavs’ interest has yet to take the form of a concrete offer, as one person connected to the Anthony drama told CBSSports.com Tuesday that Dallas had yet to present one. Any prospects the Mavs might have to pull off such a coup would be contingent on Anthony declining to sign an extension with New Jersey. With a signed extension as part of the deal, the Nets still possess by far the most attractive assets to Denver -- Derrick Favors, the expiring contract of Troy Murphy, and multiple first-round picks. 

But that is the question that the Anthony saga has hinged on for months. Part of Dallas’ strategy, according to sources, is to shift the Anthony discussions to what Cuban recently called the “rent-a-player” phase, which would drive down the price and encourage other teams to present offers without assurances that Anthony would stay put for five years -- the two he has remaining (including the early-termination option for 2011-12) plus the extension. 

Such potential suitors, including the Mavs, do not have enough of what Denver is looking for to compete with New Jersey’s best offer. But if Dallas is successful in shifting Denver’s focus to “rental” deals, the Nets would then have to decide how much they are willing to give up to acquire a franchise cornerstone for their move to Brooklyn -- even if Anthony could leave them in the dust as a free agent before the team even got there. 

Meanwhile, the Nuggets remain in a patient posture and are not in any apparent rush to push a New Jersey trade to fruition. And after acquiring two more first-round picks in a three-team trade with the Lakers and Rockets last week, Nets executives are continuing their ongoing efforts to sweeten the deal for Anthony by acquiring a veteran he’d want to play with in Newark, N.J., for a year-and-a-half. Such inducements could come in the form of Al Harrington and/or Chauncey Billups, whom Anthony might be comfortable having on board. The other scenarios, according to one executive familiar with them, are numerous and “beyond challenging” because multiple teams would be needed. 

Among the contending teams with the deep pockets and championship core to take a risk like trading for Anthony without a signed extension as part of the deal, Dallas has the most expiring money to make it worth the Nuggets’ while. Any Dallas proposal would have to include the expiring contracts of Caron Butler and DeShawn Stevenson. More money would need to be added -- Tyson Chandler? -- or a third team would need to be recruited in order to take Harrington and/or Billups off Denver’s hands. 

The notion of Anthony going to a contender -- or to the Nets, for that matter -- without signing his three-year, $65 million extension is exactly what New York Knicks officials are hoping for. Sources say the Knicks continue to believe that the longer the Anthony situation plays out, the better their chances of landing him through a trade, or more likely, as a free agent after the season and anticipated lockout. New York has been Anthony’s preferred destination since his operatives began pushing for a trade in September, and a person directly involved in Anthony’s decision-making process told CBSSports.com earlier this month that he’d become more entrenched in his desire to agree to an extend-and-trade only if he would up with the Knicks. CBSSports.com also reported that Anthony has not shared his position with Nuggets officials, and that Nets officials have been told differently by Anthony’s camp. 

Another team that various team executives believe is very much in the mix -- either to make a push to land Melo as a rental or become involved as a third-team facilitator -- is the Rockets. Houston fully expects to receive a disabled-player exception for Yao Ming totaling $5.8 million and already has a $6.3 million exception from the Trevor Ariza trade. Such exceptions can’t be combined, but individually they could be used to absorb a contract -- such as, for example, the Nuggets’ J.R. Smith’s or Harrington’s -- without sending equal money back. In return, the Rockets would either have to get a player they want or be compensated accordingly with draft picks or other assets. The Rockets also are flush with the expiring contracts of Shane Battier, Jared Jeffries, and even Yao, whose contract is insured due to his season-ending foot injury. 

Rockets owner Leslie Alexander has a history of bold moves, and has placed few restrictions on his front office, led by GM Daryl Morey, to spend money in order to win. The Rockets, for example, are currently a tax-paying team and are under no mandate from ownership to shed salary even though they are off to a slow start and have lost Yao for the season -- and maybe for good. 

A dark horse in all of this? The Mavs’ opponent Tuesday night, Orlando. The Magic have a little more than two months before the Feb. 24 trade deadline to see if their revamped roster will be good enough to contend for a title after this week’s blockbuster trades with Phoenix and Washington. But the only piece that is likely to be available and enticing to Denver is Jason Richardson, whose $14.4 million contract expires after the season. Richardson cannot be combined with other players in a trade for 60 days, which would leave just enough time before the trade deadline to involve him in the Anthony discussions. 

If -- and this is a big if -- Anthony is still a Nugget by then.
Posted on: September 21, 2010 5:56 pm
 

Preseason Primers: Mavericks


It wouldn't be time for another NBA season without the Mavericks feeling like championship contenders. But this time, the feeling is different. This time, there's a palpable belief that the Mavs had better get it done this year or their window will be closed -- for a long time, if not for good.

That's a little drastic. They're still not better than the Lakers, and still might not be able to get past the Spurs in a best-of-7 playoff series. But the Mavs enter training camp as a much better team than the one that lost to San Antonio in the first round a few months ago. With no cap space -- cap space can't score or defend, after all -- Mark Cuban struck out on the major free-agent targets. But the addition of Tyson Chandler certainly will help. Jason Kidd and Dirk Nowitzki know the window is closing, but maybe this is a good spot for them to be in. With all eyes on the Lakers, Celtics, Heat and Magic, maybe the Mavs can quietly be in the mix. If it's possible for Cuban's team to do anything quietly.

Training camp site: Southern Methodist University 

Training camp starts: Sept. 28 

Key additions: Tyson Chandler (trade), Alexis Ajinca (trade), Ian Mahinmi (free agent), Dominique Jones (draft). 

Key subtractions: Erick Dampier (trade), Eduardo Najera (trade), Matt Carroll (trade). 

Likely starting lineup: Jason Kidd, PG; Caron Butler, SG; Shawn Marion, SF; Dirk Nowitzki, PF; Tyson Chandler, C 

Player to watch: Butler. When he’s good, he’s very, very good. And when he’s bad, he’s divisive. 

Chemistry quiz: There shouldn’t be any chemistry issues on a team with so many veterans getting their last realistic shot at a championship. There shouldn’t be. But there could be, especially given that not everyone (Mark Cuban included) was on board with the rotations and substitution patterns Carlisle utilized during another underwhelming (and brief) playoff run. Teams like these, with established players vying for their spot in the pecking order, can come unglued if things don’t go well. (Did we mention Cuban’s recent comments that the Mavs have enough size and depth to beat the Lakers?) 

Injury check: Speedster Rodrigue Beaubois is likely out until November following surgery on his broken left foot. 

Camp battles: Ultimately, Carlisle faces only two starting lineup decisions. But they’re important ones: Whether to start Chandler or Brendan Haywood at center, and whether Butler starts at shooting guard with Marion at the three, or Butler at the three with Beaubois (once he’s healthy) starting in the backcourt with Kidd. Neither one of those decisions will be made in October. But all eyes will be on first-round pick (acquired from Memphis) Dominique Jones, a slasher who has a chance to crack Carlisle’s rotation and give the Mavs the dribble-penetration element they sorely lacked last season. 

Biggest strength: Size and depth. If 6-11 Frenchman Ian Mahinmi stands on a croissant, the Mavs have five legitimate 7-footers: Mahinmi, Nowitzki, Chandler, Haywood and Alexis Ajinca. It can be argued – as Cuban did recently – that Dallas is the team best equipped to combat the Lakers’ twin towers of Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum. First, the Mavs should worry about getting past the Spurs. 

Glaring weakness: Age and miles. The window is closing fast on Kidd, Dirk and Marion, and Jason Terry, all of a sudden, is 33.
Posted on: July 13, 2010 2:58 pm
Edited on: July 13, 2010 3:11 pm
 

Bobcats sending Chandler to Dallas (UPDATE)

The Bobcats have agreed to trade Tyson Chandler and Alexis Ajinca to Dallas for Erick Dampier, Eduardo Najera and Matt Carroll, a person with knowledge of the deal confirmed to CBSSports.com Tuesday.

Chandler was supposed to have gone to Toronto as part of a three-team trade also involving Phoenix. But that deal fell apart Monday night amid concerns from Bobcats owner Michael Jordan.

Jordan was concerned for good reason; the three-team trade sending Boris Diaw and Chandler to Toronto, with Jose Calderon going to Charlotte, would've been a heist for the Raptors. Toronto still wound up sending Hedo Turkoglu to Phoenix for Leandro Barbosa, the only element of the three-way talks that survived.

Dampier's $13.1 million salary for 2010-11 is fully non-guaranteed, making him a strong candidate to be waived by Charlotte.



Posted on: July 12, 2010 10:01 pm
Edited on: July 13, 2010 11:15 am
 

Agent Babby in the hunt for Suns' prez job

Agent Lon Babby is in the running to become president of the Phoenix Suns even as one of his top clients, Hedo Turkoglu, was traded to the team Monday.

But despite concerns among rival team executives about a conflict of interest, Babby disclosed his dealings with Suns owner Robert Sarver to Turkoglu, recused himself from representing the former Raptors forward, and received a written waiver from Turkoglu acknowledging his approval of the circumstances, two people with knowledge of the situation told CBSSports.com. The meticulous approach is no surprise, given Babby's reputation of being one of the most forthright agents in the business.

Nonetheless, word of Babby's candidacy to succeed Steve Kerr in Phoenix raised "red flags" among rival executives, one of the execs told CBSSports.com. Not only was Turkoglu traded to the Suns Monday, but he also agreed to waive a portion of his $5 million trade kicker and reduce the amount guaranteed in the final year of his contract as part of the deal, sources said.

Two people familiar with Turkoglu's situation told CBSSports.com that Babby's partner at Washington, D.C., law firm Williams & Connolly, Jim Tanner, had assumed the role of representing Turkoglu in view of Babby's candidacy to become the Suns' president. Babby also has long represented Suns forward Grant Hill. Turkoglu also was receiving independent advice from his financial adviser, who approved the contractual changes that facilitated the trade to Phoenix, the people said.

"Hedo was so unhappy in Toronto that he would've waived the trade kicker regardless," a third person with knowledge of the arrangement said.

In view of Babby's full disclosure, the National Basketball Players Association has no plans to challenge the move, a person familiar with the union's stance said.

Turkoglu was traded to the Suns Monday in a three-team deal that also sent Boris Diaw, Tyson Chandler and Leandro Barbosa to Toronto and Jose Calderon to Charlotte.



Posted on: July 8, 2010 2:32 pm
Edited on: July 8, 2010 2:56 pm
 

Bosh sign-and-trade grows to four teams

The Heat and Raptors have expanded discussions of the sign-and-trade sending Chris Bosh to Miami to include two more teams, Charlotte and Houston, two people with knowledge of the talks told CBSSports.com Thursday.

The trade, which is still exploratory and not close to completion, would send Bosh to Miami, Michael Beasley to Charlotte and Tyson Chandler to Houston, the sources said. Toronto, already settled on taking back the 2011 first-round pick previously traded to the Heat, is trying to extract a player from the Rockets in addition to the trade exception it would get from Miami.

"It has legs, but I don't know where it goes," one of the people familiar with the discussions said.

A third person with knowledge of the talks said it's possible that the field could shrink to three teams, with Houston dropping out of the mix.

With the Heat planning to add sharpshooter Mike Miller to their potential Dream Team of Bosh, Dwyane Wade and LeBron James, Miami would slide Miller's salary -- in the $5 million range -- into Beasley's space under the cap. By that math, the Heat would only have room for three full-max players if each one agreed to take abotuu $1 million less than the $16.57 million available under the collective bargaining agreement.







Posted on: February 18, 2009 11:32 pm
Edited on: February 19, 2009 12:28 am
 

Hornets-Thunder trade rescinded (UPDATE)

Tyson Chandler is going back to New Orleans after the Hornets-Thunder trade was rescinded late Wednesday night because the 7-1 centerpiece was not cleared by Oklahoma City doctors.

In a stunning development announced shortly after 11 p.m. EST, the trade sending Chandler to the Thunder for the expiring contracts of Joe Smith and Chris Wilcox, plus the rights to 2008 second-round pick DeVon Hardin, was voided. It wasn't clear what issue Thunder doctors discovered, but it doesn't matter. The deal's off.

"We welcome Tyson back with open arms," Hornets general manager Jeff Bower said in a statement released by the team. "We went into this trade to garner more frontcourt depth to add to our team as we continue our push towards the playoffs. We expect Tyson and the rest of our big guys to step up to the challenge."

Thunder GM Sam Presti said in a statement: "During the course of the physical examination and outside consultations, some questions arose that gave us cause for concern. We felt that this course of action was the best for our organization.”

UPDATE: Yahoo! Sports reports that the injury in question is turf toe, which Chandler had surgically repaired a couple of years ago. Regardless, the next question is this: Where do the Hornets turn now to get the luxury tax and payroll savings they thought they'd achieved with the Chandler deal?

The cash-strapped Hornets thought they were going to save almost $12 million next season and close to $25 over the next two years by trading Chandler. The only way they can clear that much money without tearing up their team is to part with Peja Stojakovic, who is due almost $30 million over the next two years. The trade deadline just became a lot more interesting.

 

 

Posted on: February 17, 2009 8:08 pm
 

Wow, the Hornets really are broke

When a team executive told me recently that the New Orleans Hornets would be actively trying to dump salary by Thursday's trade deadline because, "They're broke," he wasn't kidding.

The salary dump has begun, and there will be more where that came from across the league.

Tyson Chandler's numbers were down this season, but not enough to justify trading him to Oklahoma City for Chris Wilcox, that annual trade-deadline, expiring-contract favorite, Joe Smith, and the rights to the Thunder's 2008 second-round pick, DeVon Hardin.

The move saves the Hornets about $11.5 million next season, depending on what they do with Hardin, and $12.75 million in 2009-10. Both Wilcox and Smith are on contracts that expire after this season.

The Thunder are very likely not done. The rights to Hardin and the aforementioned expiring contracts were only the tip of the iceberg in terms of tradeable assets GM Sam Presti has at his disposal -- not the least of which are five first-round picks in the next two drafts.

 

 

 

Posted on: December 19, 2008 10:07 am
 

Jazz owner rips Boozer

Carlos Boozer was looking dapper in a nicely tailored suit Wednesday night as he stood in the bowels of the IZOD Center chatting with one of my competitors, Chris Sheridan of ESPN.com. What Boozer said during the interview has sent the already fragile Jazz into a tailspin.

What did Boozer say, you ask? That his strained left quadriceps tendon would keep him out until the All-Star break, or for the rest of the season? That Jerry Sloan was a grouchy old man? That Paul Millsap was the most overrated player in the NBA -- not the most underrated, the honor CBSSports.com bestowed upon him Thursday?

Nope. Nothing quite that controversial. Nothing even remotely surprising or combustible at all.

Boozer simply confirmed what anyone who follows professional basketball should have known: That he intends to declined his $12.7 million player option this coming summer and seek a long-term deal.

"I'm opting out. No matter what, I'm going to get a raise regardless," Boozer said. "I am going to opt out, I don't see why I wouldn't, I think it's a very good business decision for me and my family, but I'd also like to see what happens with the Jazz and stay here."

That quote rippled through the Jazz organization, all the way up to owner Larry Miller, who blistered Boozer on his weekly radio show Thursday.

 "It's one of the top 10 stupidest things I've heard an NBA player do in 20 years," Miller said.

Why would this come as such a surprise? Top-tier players like Boozer and Kobe Bryant (early termination clauses in '09), plus LeBron James, Chris Bosh, and Dwyane Wade (player options in 2010) specifically negotiated escape clauses in their current deals -- escape clauses that kick in before the current collective bargaining agreement expires. A host of others -- Dirk Nowitzki, Steve Nash, Amare Stoudemire, Michael Redd, Yao Ming, Paul Pierce, Richard Jefferson, Tyson Chandler -- have early termination clauses in 2010. What's the big deal?

All of these clauses were negotiated so marquee players would have a chance to sign long-term deals -- in many cases, the last of their careers -- under the current rules. Once the CBA expires in 2011, most players and agents believe the new agreement will be less favorable to them and more favorable to the owners. All of the above players will get more money if they opt out or terminate their contracts before the CBA expires than they would if they waited.

James has parsed his words carefully in discussing his 2010 options, but he has all but said what Boozer said the other night -- that he plans to decline his player option and become a free agent. That doesn't mean James, Boozer, Bosh, Wade and others will leave their teams; after all, their current teams can pay them more and give them longer deals. Boozer went so far as to say that in his quote, adding that he'd "like to see what happens with the Jazz and stay here."

Despite the fact that Boozer was merely being honest and essentially stating the obvious, Jazz coach Jerry Sloan expressed disappointment with his comments. Boozer went into damage control mode with local beat reporters; here is the transcript of their conference call. Boozer and the Jazz tried to blame the messenger, a standard media relations ploy when someone says something controversial. The spin was that Boozer thought he was simply chatting off the record with Sheridan, who spent a lot of time with Boozer and teammate Deron Williams while covering Team USA's gold medal run in Beijing. Boozer even invoked the old "the reporter put words in my mouth" tactic. Don't believe it.

There was nothing off-the-record or sinister about this, and nothing really surprising or controversial, either. It's just business, people. Good business, at that. Can't be mad at Boozer -- or any other player -- for that.

 

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com