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Tag:NBPA
Posted on: September 26, 2011 1:32 pm
Edited on: September 26, 2011 1:59 pm
 

NBA, union to meet Tuesday

NEW YORK -- Officials from the NBA and its players' union are finalizing details of a bargaining session that will take place Tuesday in New York and possibly extend to Wednesday, a person familiar with the details told CBSSports.com.

With the prospect of two days of negotiations as the calendar marches toward the eventual canceling of regular season games in less than three weeks,  National Basketball Players Association executive director Billy Hunter has postponed a regional meeting that had been scheduled for Tuesday in Miami and will stay in New York for talks with the league, the person with knowledge of the meeting said.

On Friday, the league indefinitely postponed the start of training camps and canceled preseason games scheduled for Oct. 9-15. Deputy commissioner Adam Silver said the schedule will be further evaluated on Oct. 1. It is likely that the league would have to begin canceling regular season games by Oct. 14 if it is unable to reach an agreement with the union on a new collective bargaining ageement.

The precise composition and format for the negotiations is still being determined due to a scheduling conflict of at least one key member of the parties that have made progress in small-group settings since Aug. 31. Once that is resolved, the goal is to continue with the small-group sessions with commissioner David Stern, Silver, deputy general counsel Dan Rube and Spurs owner Peter Holt representing the league and Hunter, NBPA president Derek Fisher, general counsel Ron Klempner and economist Kevin Murphy representing the players.

Tuesday and Wednesday represent the last opportunities to bargain this week with several key members of both sides' negotiating teams observing Rosh Hashanah on Thursday and Friday.

Negotiations resume after the league made a slight but significant revision last week to its most recent proposal on how to divide the sport's approximately $4 billion in basketball-related income (BRI). Sources say the owners' latest economic proposal amounted to an average 46 percent of BRI for the players over the life of the deal, which the union deemed "unacceptable." But the revised proposal represented a 2 percent increase from the owners' June proposal of a flat $2.01 billion annual guarantee for the players in the first eight years of a 10-year deal. That proposal started at about a 50-50 split of BRI in the 2011-12 season, but with revenues projected to increase about 4 percent a year, the players' share would shrink over time -- to about 39 percent in the eighth year of the deal.

The latest proposal from the owners called for the players' share to decline at a slower rate, sources said. According to one of the people familiar with the negotiations, the players most recently proposed a six-year CBA that would begin with a salary freeze in the first year ($2.17 billion, same as they made last season) and then go to 54 percent -- a 3 percent decline from the players' guarantee of 57 percent in the six-year deal that expired July 1.

Hunter also has signaled a willingness to negotiate below the 54 percent offer, with the caveat that it not include the implementation of a hard salary cap. Sources say both sides have expressed a willingness to negotiate on system and cap issues once they agree on the economic aspects of the deal.




Posted on: September 23, 2011 11:45 am
Edited on: September 23, 2011 12:28 pm
 

Sources: Owners' offer still below 50 percent

NEW YORK -- More details emerged Friday of a revised proposal from the owners on the split of revenues with the players, with two sources telling CBSSports.com that the aggregate share offered by the league remains below 49 percent.

The number offered Thursday by commissioner David Stern and deputy commissioner Adam Silver was deemed "unacceptable" by representatives of the National Basketball Players Association, according to one of the sources familiar with the proposal. The two sides emerged from a five-hour negotiation with no deal and with full recognition that training camps would be postponed and preseason games would be canceled.

That inevitable and widely expected announcement came Friday, when the league postponed indefinitely the start of camps -- which were supposed to open Oct. 3 -- and scrapped 43 preseason games scheduled from Oct. 9-15.

The two sides are communicating Friday to schedule another bargaining session for next week, when the owners' gesture -- however small -- to move off the $2 billion-a-year players' share for the first eight years of a 10-year proposal is expected to accelerate negotiations on the economic portion of the agreement.

This is the first time the league has formally offered a number in terms of the BRI split since they proposed an annual guarantee of $2.01 billion as part of a 10-year proposal in late June.

It is both curious and an inevitable function of the calendar -- the league is still three weeks away from having to cancel regular season games -- that the owners emerged from a series of productive bargaining sessions and a full Board of Governors meeting to present a BRI split that still has the players receiving less than half of the league's approximately $4 billion in revenues. After NBPA executive director Billy Hunter stated his intention to go below the union's previous offer of a 54.3 percent share for the players, Stern and Silver acknowledged that an agreement on the economics was within reach.

Stern told reporters last Tuesday that the players' gesture -- which was preconditioned on the owners dropping their insistence on a hard salary cap -- was "on the road" to a compromise on the overall dollars.

"The question is, how long is that road?" one person connected to the talks said Friday. "Is it the Road to Hana?"

Under the six-year CBA that expired July 1, the players were guaranteed 57 percent of basketball-related income.

Examining the owners' June proposal of $2.01 billion for eight years, the numbers work out to an average of 44 percent of BRI for the players. (Estimating 4 percent annual revenue growth, total revenues in the first eight years of the deal would be approximately $36.4 billion, reaching $5 billion for the first time in league history in the seventh year.)

So even though the players would get an estimated 51 percent of BRI in the first year of the deal ($2.01 billion out of $3.95 billion), with revenues increasing and salaries remaining flat, their share would decline to 39 percent in the eighth year.

The numbers offered by league negotiators Thursday amounted to an average share for the players that was still less than 49 percent and provided what one person familiar with the numbers described as a lesser decline in their percentage over the years.

So in estimating how far apart the owners and players are economically, my presumption that the league must have offered more than 50 percent on Thursday -- since that's what they'd offered in the first year of the June proposal -- did not take into account the declining percentage over time. Since the previous offer was 44 percent in the aggregate over eight years, what the owners came forward with Thursday had to have been in the the 45-48 percent range on average over the life of a new CBA.

So how far apart are they? It's hard to say for sure since so many of the proposals have been hypothetical and they haven't gotten around to negotiating what system they'd be tied to. But if you look at a six-year horizon -- the longest proposal the players have offered -- the difference between 53 percent for the players and a possible owners' proposal of, say, 46 percent, would be about $2 billion.

What's a couple of billion among friends? It's a lot of ground to cover in three weeks, but vastly less than the $8 billion over 10 years that separated the two sides three months ago.







Posted on: September 22, 2011 5:18 pm
Edited on: September 22, 2011 6:56 pm
 

Silence on labor talks; preseason to be delayed

NEW YORK -- Amid outsized expectations for progress, top negotiators for the NBA and players' union met for five hours Thursday with both sides refusing to charaterize the talks.

"We're not going to draw any conclusions or say anything other than we had a full day and we hope to meet again next week," commissioner David Stern said on his 69th birthday. 

Stern intimated that he and deputy commissioner Adam Silver will brief the full labor relations committee Friday, presumably by phone, on the status of talks. It is widely anticipated that, without a deal, the league will announce in the coming days -- perhaps as early as Friday -- that it is postponing the start of training camps and preseason. Camps were supposed to open on Oct. 3. Management sources told CBSSports.com they've been advised to expect an announcement of the cancellations on Friday after Stern briefs the owners on the talks.

"I have no announcement to make today, but the calendar is not our friend. Derek Fisher, the president of the National Basketball Players Association, also used that phrase about the calendar and was equally protective of details from Thursday's talks, which included the smaller group of negotiators who'd made progress in a series of three meetings that began Aug. 31. Fisher and Stern emerged from the Upper East Side hotel with an equally flatlined demeanor and monotoned speech -- evidence, perhaps, that there was agreement on at least one aspect of the negotiations: that neither side would put on a public show or negotiate in the media.

In declining to answer a string of specific questions about the bargaining session, Stern at one point interjected, "I'm sorry, but the most important thing is to see whether we can't have negotiations conducive to ultimately getting a deal, which is what our committee and our board will like. And having these conversations with you doesn't add anything to that. And that's the dilemma."

The talks involving the heavy hitters -- Stern, Silver, Spurs owner Peter Holt and deputy general counsel Dan Rube for the league and union chief Billy Hunter, Fisher, general counsel Ron Klempner and economist Kevin Murphy for the players -- followed a full day of what Silver described as "more intensive discussions" among lawyers and staff for both sides at the NBPA's Harlem office. Stern wouldn't say if the league brought anything new to the table coming out of Wednesday's meetings and a gathering of the full Board of Governors las week in Dallas.

"I'm not going to say," Stern said when asked if any proposals were exchanged.

Fisher said no new topics were discussed Thursday and said the league provided no details of its revenue sharing plan.

"We're trying to figure out ways to come together," Fisher said. "We couldn't do it today, and hopefully we'll get another opportunity next week to continue to try and figure this thing out."
Posted on: September 22, 2011 8:34 am
Edited on: September 22, 2011 8:48 am
 

'Blood issue' time for both sides

NEW YORK -- Is it time for a deal to go down in the NBA labor talks Thursday?

Maybe.

But probably not.

After Wednesday's meeting among lawyers and staff for both sides at the National Basketbal Players Association offices in Harlem, the top negotiators and power brokers for both sides will reconvene in Manhattan Thursday for a critical bargaining session amid the threat of imminent canceling of training camps and preseason games.

It will be the same group of negotiators that had made significant progress in a series of three high-level meetings that began Aug. 31, only to have the talks break down last Tuesday when the full bargaining committees could not move the dialogue past the players' resistance to a hard salary cap and the owners' insistence on one. Commissioner David Stern, deputy commisssioner Adam Silver, Spurs owner Peter Holt and deputy general counsel Dan Rube -- the league's top authority on contracts, the cap and system issues -- will represent the league while union executive director Billy Hunter, president Derek Fisher, general counsel Ron Klempner and economist Kevin Murphy will represent the players.

While the small groups seemed to have been on the verge of a compromise after the three meetings leading up to last week's setback, intransigence on both sides scuttled the progress. Hunter's refusal to move ahead with an economic concession unless the owners agreed to the pre-condition that the soft-cap system remain intact caused league negotiators to retrench and reject the ultimatum. From the owners' standpoint, the full bargaining committee that convened last Tuesday in New York did not signal the same willingness to compromise as the small group led by Stern, Silver and Holt had previously expressed, according to a person directly linked to the talks.

The key issues Thursday are two-fold, and most certainly are intertwined. For the players, did union leadership emerge from a meeting last week in Las Vegas with enough clout to resist the owners' push for a hard cap while at the same time being willing to negotiate enough system changes to move the dialogue forward? Did league negotiators return from a Board of Governors meeting in Dallas with the authority to divulge to the union details of their revenue sharing plans while achieving enough unanimity among owners to move forward with the framework of a compromise?

To borrow a phrase from Hunter, it is "blood issue" time for both sides.
Posted on: September 20, 2011 10:26 am
Edited on: September 20, 2011 12:48 pm
 

More NBA talks with on-time start at stake

NEW YORK -- With time running short on efforts to preserve an on-time start to the NBA season, the league and players' association will have a staff-level meeting Wednesday with the hopes that it will set the stage for the next round of bargaining, multiple sources told CBSSports.com.

The meeting Wednesday in Manhattan will not feature the heavy hitters for either side -- no Billy Hunter or Derek Fisher for the union, and no David Stern for the league, sources said. Some key figures involved in the talks requested this format, which will consist mostly of lawyers and staff for both sides.

UPDATE: It is unclear what items will be on the agenda, but the staff meeting is expected to set the stage for a possible meeting of top negotiators on Thursday, one of the sources familiar with the plans said. The two sides have been discussing the possibility of another high-level bargaining session this week after talks featuring the full committees broke down last week. Although the Thursday meeting is not yet confirmed, it is expected to include the same rosters as three small sessions that preceded last week's talks -- Stern, deputy commissioner Adam Silver, Spurs owner Peter Holt and deputy general counsel Dan Rube for the league with Hunter, Fisher, economist Kevin Murphy and lead attorneys representing the union.

After the full session last Tuesday left the two sides stalled on system issues and the owners' desire for (and players' resistance to) a hard cap, the players met Thursday in Las Vegas to reassure membership and urge players to stick together. The owners' full Board of Governors met the same day in Dallas, where the planning committee chaired by Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck was expected to update the board on enhanced revenue sharing plans.

The fact that the two sides are willing to reconvene so soon after large-group talks stalled is neither a positive nor a negative sign until we learn what each side is bringing to the table. Sources familiar with the negotiations said the players want details about the owners' revenue sharing plans and a firm commitment from owners on how and when they plan to implement them. The two sides also remain entrenched in their respective positions on a hard salary cap, although Stern said last week that everything was negotiable and sources familiar with the league's stance say the owners have always been open to negotiating the changes to the system they are seeking.

After the large group session last week -- in which each side spent more time in separate rooms than actually bargaining face-to-face -- the dynamics are shifting back to the smaller sessions that prevailed in three meetings over the two weeks prior. With hopes of starting the season on time expected to dim significantly after this week, now would be the time for movement from both sides.



Posted on: September 15, 2011 12:16 pm
 

DeMaurice Smith to address NBA players

Facing the difficult challenge of keeping the union together in the face of stalled labor talks with the owners, the National Basketball Players Association has recruiited NFL players' union executive director DeMaurice Smith to address locked-out players in Las Vegas Thursday.

A person connected to the NBA talks confirmed that Smith will speak to a gathering of about 70 NBA players at a Las Vegas hotel as players and owners meet separately to brief their constituents on the negotiations. The owners' Board of Governors is meeting Thursday in dallas.

According to SI.com, which first reported Smith's involvement, the invitation came from NBPA president Derek Fisher, who hopes that Smith will be able to explain to the players the importance of remaining united during the lockout. Smith, who directed his first collective bargaining talks with the NFL and secured a new CBA that ended the lockout without losing games, also is expected to tell the players that the NFLPA's strategy of decertification does not necessarily apply in the same way to the NBA talks.

For one, the NFL players faced a collectively bargained deadline to decertify and disband their union in an effort to thwart the owners' lockout. The strategy was never addressed in a broad ruling by the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in the NFL case, and labor law experts fear such a strategy by the NBA players would be so time consuming that it would jeopardize a significant portion of the season with no guarantees of a favorable ruling in federal court.

Either way, Smith's presence at the critical NBA players' meeting is sure to generate commentary from both sides of the decertification argument. For several high-profile agents pushing for a decertification vote that could topple NBPA chief Billy Hunter, the irony will not be lost that Smith will be preaching unity to the NBA players after following a strategy that temporarily dissolved his own union in the NFL talks.

Fisher and teammate Kobe Bryant are represented by agent Rob Pelinka, who is not among the agents pushing for the union to disband. So you can see where this is going. Fisher is embracing his role as the point man charged with keeping players with varying agendas and pay levels on the same page. Having offered to make an economic move that league negotiators believe would've been an important step in the negotiations, the NBPA is trying to preserve a flexible cap system and thwart the contingent of owners who seem to be willing to lose the entire season over their insistence on instituting a hard salary cap.

To that point, Smith is likely to come away from Thursday's meeting with as much enlightenment as the players listening to him. This NBA labor fight makes the one Smith resolved with the NFL look like a minor disagreement over who picks up the check at one of those cheap, all-you-can-eat Vegas buffets.

Posted on: September 13, 2011 4:53 pm
Edited on: September 13, 2011 4:57 pm
 

NBA talks at stalemate, start of season imperiled

NEW YORK -- Full committees of NBA owners and players met Tuesday with a hint of progress on the economic split but no signs of compromise on the hard salary cap owners are trying to impose.

After five hours -- most of it spent with each side symbolically huddled amongst themselves, apropos of their deeply entrenched bargaining stances -- National Basketball Players Association executive director Billy Hunter and president Derek Fisher warned that it appears the season will not start on time. Hunter said he has advised players that they "may have to sit out half the season before we get a deal."

"We can't come out of here thinking that training camps and preseason are going to start on time," Fisher said.

Commissioner David Stern did not share that dour outlook, saying emphatically that owners would not cancel training camps or preseason games at the Board of Governors meeting in Dallas Thursday. Appropriate to their diametrically opposed positions on changes to the cap system the owners have proposed, each side blamed the other for the breakdown in talks.

After three seemingly productive meetings among only the highest-level negotiators in recent weeks, Hunter said the players insisted that the full bargaining teams be brought in Tuesday to see if compromise could be achieved before each side holds a significant meeting Thursday, when the players will convene in Las Vegas. The players were "prepared to compromise somewhat" on their share of revenues, which they'd previously proposed reducing from 57 percent to 54.3 percent.

"The owners are not inclined at this stage to move off the position where they've anchored themselves," Hunter said, adding that players remain steadfast against accepting a system that distributes the money to players via a hard cap.

Stern and deputy commissioner Adam Silver told a diferent story, saying the players signaled their willingness to compromise on dollars only if the owners agreed in advance that the system -- with a soft cap, luxury tax, and various spending exceptions -- would remain largely intact. The owners huddled -- for about three of the 5 1-2 hour, Hunter said -- and emerged to reject the players' request. Neither side actually made a formal proposal Tuesday.

Stern called the players' opposition to a hard cap "an emotional attachment," while Hunter argued that it would depress player salaries -- a point that Silver vehemently disputed.



Posted on: September 9, 2011 4:24 pm
 

Sources: No movement on major NBA issues

NEW YORK -- As the basketball world awaits a crucial phase of the NBA labor talks next week, the devil we don't know has been in the details of accelerated negotiations that concluded Thursday with a second 5 1-2 hour session in as many days. And while the tone and pace of talks has picked up, CBSSports.com has learned that there has been no formal movement in either side's position on the biggest sticking points in the deal: the split of revenues and the cap system.

According to five people briefed on the three days of high-level talks over the past two weeks, the two sides essentially are in the same place they've been since the owners' most recent formal proposal in late June: billions of dollars apart.

"I don't think they've made any progress there at all," one of the people briefed on the negotiations told CBSSports.com. "They're talking a lot, and the conversations are more cordial. But as far as the real numbers, I don't think there's anything there."

Before panic sets in, it is not necessarily a doomsday scenario that no new numbers have been agreed upon because, as two of the people with knowledge of the talks said, exchanging formal proposals was not the objective of this week's negotiations. This, in addition to the agreed upon strategy for neither side to discuss specific negotiating points, explains the vague answers given Thursday by union president Derek Fisher and deputy commissioner Adam Silver when pressed on whether new proposals have been exchanged.

"Ideas, proposals, concepts and numbers" have been discussed, Silver said, while Fisher said "tons of ideas" were exchanged. What this means is that Tuesday's full negotiating session including the complete bargaining committees for both sides could be extraordinarily significant. The larger meeting will serve as a litmus test for the concepts discussed in smaller groups consisting of Silver, commissioner David Stern, Spurs owner Peter Holt, deputy and general counsel Dan Rube for the owners and Fisher, executive director Billy Hunter, general counsel Ron Klempner, outside counsel Jeffrey Kessler and economist Kevin Murphy for the union.

"Next week's really important," one of the people briefed on the talks said.

But another person connected to the talks at the highest level stressed that the significance of Tuesday's meeting would be greatly enhanced only if one side or the other decided it was time to transform the ideas discussed at recent meetings into a formal proposal. Technically, it is the owners' turn to make one, as the players were the last side to do so June 30 before the lockout was imposed.

"The reality is, until one side or the other is ready to make significant movement, nothing is going to happen," the person said.

According to one of the people familiar with the talks, Fisher's statement Thursday about making sure "our general membership" agrees with ideas before he can "sign off on those type of deals" suggested that negotiators presented new concepts that must be vetted with a larger group of players before they can be negotiated further. The goal Tuesday will be to see if the conceptual, small-group discussions can provide any framework for the larger groups until the owners disperse for their Board of Governors meeting in Dallas. Both sides seem to be feeling a sense of urgency to present a significant status report to their constituents on Thursday, when the players also have scheduled a meeting in Las Vegas to update union members on the talks. 

It's when you consider the possibility that each side may prefer to report to its constituents that it is holding the line and not making any more concessions that the prospects for a breakthrough seem remote.

"They're bringing the full committees in to sit down with each other and see if they can make any progress by Thursday," one of the people with knowledge of the talks said. "They'll either say, 'Here, we've made progress and here's where we're at,' or, 'We're not making any progress and we're light years apart.'"

Sources say the two sides are trying to tackle the biggest obstacle first -- the split of revenues -- before fully addressing the system by which the money will be distributed. One of the people informed of the state of negotiations said the players have expressed a willingness to compromise on the split of revenues -- they received 57 percent under the previous deal and have proposed 54.3 percent as a starting point in a new collective bargaining agreement -- if they can keep many aspects of the current system in place, such as guaranteed contracts and contract lengths. But if asked to accept a dramatic decrease in their percentage of BRI and a curtailment of guarantees, rookie scale, cap exceptions and contract lengths, "I think the players would fight that to the end," one of the people said.

The owners' proposal to cut salaries and hold them steady at $2 billion a year "is a big point," one of the people said. "But the cap is an even bigger point. The players are willing to give back more if the structure and the NBA operating the way we've always known it stays the same or similar."

As Silver has said on more than one occasion, the owners are unified in their belief that they cannot continue operating under the current system.

The most recent concessions by the owners that were made public included a "flex-cap" with a $62 million midpoint and a sliding scale up and down -- similar to the cap system implemented in the NHL after a lockout that cost the entire 2004-05 season. On June 23, the players declined to counter that proposal after Hunter called the owners' demands "gargantuan" and said, "We just can't meet them." At the time, the owners also expressed a willingness to relax their insistence on eliminating fully guaranteed contracts -- which Hunter has called a "blood issue" for the players.

The players' most recent publicly known concessions included a $100 million-a-year salary reduction over a five-year CBA -- which Stern called "modest" and league negotiators view as more of a $100 million-a-year decrease in salary growth. Subsequently, the players offered a more owner-friendly split of future revenues and added a sixth year to their proposal, which Stern rejected June 30 because he said it would increase the average NBA player's salary from its current level of $5 million to $7 million by the end of the proposed deal.




 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com