Tag:DeVier Posey
Posted on: January 24, 2012 8:21 am
Edited on: January 25, 2012 1:58 pm
 

QB, WRs emerge at Monday's North Sr Bowl practice

MOBILE, Ala. -- Making a strong first impression at the Senior Bowl can send a player's stock skyrocketing and boost his rookie contract by millions of dollars.

Michigan State quarterback Kirk Cousins and California wide receiver Marvin Jones can't start writing checks just yet but if they continue the sparkling efforts turned in Monday during the North Team practices they could prove to be two of the big winners from this year's Senior Bowl.

Cousins out-shined Wisconsin's Russell Wilson and Boise State's Kellen Moore by attacking all levels of a talented North defense. His experience in a pro-style offense was obvious as he made quick decisions, showed accuracy short, middle and deep and thread the needle through tight spaces. Whereas his teammates struggled to find a rhythm with their new receiving corps, Cousins was hitting on all cylinders, spreading the ball all over the field and hitting his backs, tight ends and receivers on a variety of routes.

Like Cousins, Jones entered the Senior Bowl with significantly less hype that others at his position. Jones, who measured in at a shade under 6-2 and 200 pounds during the morning weigh-ins, was quick off the snap, showed burst out of his breaks to gain separation and the speed to slip past cornerbacks for big plays. He caught everything thrown his way, showing the hand strength to gather in passes thrown slightly off-target as well as the vision to track deep balls over his shoulder.

Jones wasn't the only wideout to make eye-popping plays on the day, though he was the most consistent.

A few uncharacteristic drops from Appalachian State's Brian Quick late in Monday's practice dampened an otherwise strong initial showing from the FCS All-American. Quick, who measured in at a chiseled 6-3 (and a 1/2) and 222 pounds Monday morning was the early star among receivers. Though not sudden off the line of scrimmage, his long-strides help him to quickly eat up the cushion and he showed terrific hand-eye coordination making several impressive catches out of some poor throws. Quick, in fact, arguably made the catch of the day when he snatched a quick out thrown high and wide by Moore. Quick used every bit of his height and long arms to pull the ball down while dragging both feet in bounds to secure the catch.

It took some strong catches from Jones, Quick and a few other North receivers to get Moore on track. The Boise State All-American appeared every bit as un-athletic as scouts feared when he measured in at a touch under 6-0 (5'11 and 3/4) and 191 pounds during the weigh-in. Worse, concerns about his arm strength appeared to be legitimate when he struggled connecting with his receivers on simple quick outs to open practice. As practice went on, however, Moore seemed to settle in and the accuracy and touch he demonstrated in throwing a staggering 142 touchdowns against just 28 interceptions during his record-breaking career with the Broncos were again on display. Moore is especially effective throwing down the seam, showing excellent touch to settle passes in over the linebacker and in front of the safety to slot receivers and tight ends.

Russell Wilson clearly has the arm strength to make NFL throws but was surprisingly tentative in his first Senior Bowl practice. Too often he stood flat-footed in the pocket and surveyed the field looking for easy completions. He attacked holes when he saw them, rifling in passes through tight coverage but also stared down his receivers on occasion and was nearly picked off a few times.

Of the North's receivers, Ohio State's Devier Posey provided the biggest challenge to a talented defensive backfield that included Nebraska's Alfonzo Dennard, graded by some scouts entering the year among the nation's elite senior prospects at any position. Posey's speed allowed him to slip past Dennard as well as Iowa State's Leonard Johnson and Boston College's Donnie Fletcher but too often Posey simply dropped the ball when his quarterbacks didn't place it perfectly. Posey struggled adjusting to passes slightly behind and had a couple of big play opportunities simply bounce to the ground because he allowed passes to get into his pads rather than catching the ball with his hands.

The concern was the exact opposite for his Big Ten rival Marvin McNutt from the Iowa Hawkeyes. McNutt has excellent size (6'2 1/2, 212 pounds), strength, hands and route-running to be a possession receiver in the NFL  but didn't show much in terms of elusiveness or the speed to turn short and intermediate passes into big plays. He is a savvy route-runner, however, who was consistently open despite aggressive coverage from defensive backs.

It wasn't a standout practice for any of the North's defensive backs. Dennard showed his characteristic physicality in challenging big and small receivers, alike, but also proved vulnerable to double-moves, getting beaten over the top by Jones and McNutt, alike.

Oklahoma's Jamell Fleming and Cal Poly's Asa Jackson had their moments, each demonstrating a quick, low backpedal and good burst back to the ball.

Scouts will want to see improvement from Fletcher and Penn State's D'Anton Lynn. Each struggled to keep up with the North's receivers, showing average change of direction and speed. Fletcher was turned around on several occasions early in practice before the North's quarterbacks and receivers turned their attention to Lynn. The former Nittany Lion was victimized by Cousins and Wilson often as practice wore, perhaps an indication of their comfort with his limited playing speed and awareness after having played against him in the Big Ten.

Extra Notes: The Monday morning weigh-in put the spotlight on a couple of under-the-radar prospects scouts will no doubt be keeping an eye on this week. Quick looked every bit the part of a standout NFL receiver with his impressive measurables, as did Utah State inside linebacker Bobby Wagner (6'0, 241), Boise State running back Doug Martin (5'09, 219) and Michigan defensive lineman Mike Martin (6'1, 307). Though the Martins are not related, one wouldn't know it by their compact, heavily muscled builds... Clemson defensive end Andre Branch was among those who may have been caught in the bad weather that kept several from getting into Mobile as planned. NFL officials informed scouts that Branch would be participating this week but that he was not in Mobile for Monday morning's weigh-in... Cincinnati running back Isaiah Pead got an opportunity to field punts late in Monday's practice, showing the concentration to catch the ball in traffic as well as the burst, elusiveness and vision you'd expect from the all-conference running back. Pead was rarely used in this capacity while with the Bearcats but turned some heads with his few opportunities Monday... Boise State's Shea McClellin (6-3, 248) lined up at defensive end for the Broncos but practiced at outside linebacker for the Minnesota Vikings' staff Monday. He showed good footwork in the bag drills early...

 

Posted on: June 2, 2011 2:06 pm
Edited on: June 2, 2011 8:46 pm
 

Lockout means Supp. prospects may not slip

Jim Tressel's resignation has fueled a great deal of speculation that five of his former players might make the jump into the NFL's supplemental draft.

I've been asked by many as to my thoughts on QB Terrelle Pryor, OT Mike Adams, RB Dan Herron, WR Devier Posey and DE Solomon Thomas and how each might project to the NFL.

When the initial news broke in December that these players were going to be suspended, I argued that Adams was the most intriguing pro prospect of the bunch at the time. Adams is NFLDraftScout.com's No. 2 rated senior offensive tackle heading into the season.

One of the points I tried to make to others writing stories on the "Ohio State five" and any other potential supplemental draft prospects is that historically players drafted in July have a tendency to slip further than their grades might indicate. Put simply, teams are hesitant to give up April draft picks for players selected in the Supplemental Draft. Often players would slip a round or two further down the board in July than where they would have been picked in April.

Due to the lockout, however, this year's Supplemental Draft could be different, if NFL sources are to believed.

The primary reason why supplemental prospects have a tendency to drop, I'm told, is that typically they are far behind the rookies drafted in April. The April rookies generally have a significant advantage over any players drafted in July as they typically have been able to participate in a few mini camps.

That, of course, has not yet occurred for the Class of 2011 rookies, as they and veteran players haven't had any sustained contact with their NFL coaching staffs.

Therefore, the disadvantage that supplemental prospects would typically have is gone, making any who apply to the NFL for special eligibility this year potentially graded (and drafted) higher than they would in most July drafts.
Posted on: December 23, 2010 11:39 pm
 

Suspended or not, Pryor, others should return

The NCAA's harsh reaction to Ohio State players Terrelle Pryor, Daniel "Boom" Herron, Devier Posey, Mike Adams and Solomon Thomas ' foolish decisions to pawn game-worn gear and memorabilia for cash and tatoos could push the five players into an even worse decision -- declaring early for the NFL draft.

I certainly understand the argument for the players to enter the draft early. After all, taking five games away from them next season leaves them precious little time to boost their draft stock or resurrect whatever legacy they've tarnished at Ohio State.

The harsh reality, however, is that these fives Buckeyes simply aren't ready for the NFL, especially quarterback Terrelle Pryor .

Pryor, of course, is the man most expected to leave early following this ruling. Yet, he's the one who has the most to lose by coming out before he's ready. While scouts can't ignore his 6-6, 235 pound frame and wonderful athleticism, they also won't ignore his struggles reading defenses, tendency to throw late over the middle and, most of all, his marginal accuracy.

There may be a team willing to gamble on his spectacular upside (especially considering the success Michael Vick is having this season) in the first round, but a Top 32 pick is no guarantee for Pryor despite his obvious talent and hype.

Should he return, however, with Andrew Luck, Cameron Newton and Ryan Mallett likely already in the NFL, he'd enter the year (albeit five games late) among the top quarterback prospects. Finishing his senior season out strong and perhaps adding a game by attending the Senior Bowl and he'd be in prime position for a top pick in 2012.

While he'll likely be the least hyped of the five players in this ugly story, the most pro-ready of the group is actually left tackle Mike Adams . The 6-8, 305 pound Adams emerged as a force this season, earning First Team All-Big Ten honors in his first full season as the Buckeyes starter. Entering the year, however, he was not lock to win the starting job at all. Like Pryor, there is no denying Adams' upside, but with his balance, hand technique and awareness all question marks, he should return to iron out the wrinkles to his game. If he were to come out this year, considering the talent of this year's OT class, he'd likely be a 2nd or 3rd round pick. Returning, however, he'd rate among the top senior offensive tackle prospects in the country.

Posey and Thomas, strictly from a scouting standpoint, should return, as well.

The one possible exception is the running back, Herron. The reason he should consider leaving school early has nothing to do with the suspension and doesn't mean he's a spectacular prospect. In fact, if he comes out, I'll be surprised if he's drafted earlier than the 3rd round. However, running backs can only absorb so much punishment and with 454 "touches" already, scouts know what he can do.

I don't necessarily believe that Pryor, Adams or the others will heed my advice. The reaction from most of us in a similar situation as the one they find themselves in is to think, "the heck with it, I'm going pro." It is the reaction that some writers would take . It certainly is the reaction that most 20 or 21 year-olds with an inflated perception of their pro stock might take.

But in reality, these Buckeyes, while very talented, have a ways to go before they're ready for the NFL.

Remember that for complete draft coverage, be sure to check out NFLDraftScout.com or simply click here. 


 
 
 
 
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