Tag:Jarrett Brown
Posted on: February 28, 2010 11:22 am
 

Impressions from first QB-WR session -- QB Report

I was among the fortunate handful of media members allowed to venture inside Lucas Oil Stadium to watch this morning's quarterback and wide receivers workouts. Because I have to head back out to cover the second session in just a few moments, I don't have enough to time to really break down the 20+ players I watched.

However, here were my impressions of a few noteworthy players.

Of the quarterbacks, the two most impressive players were the Browns, as in West Virginia's Jarrett Brown and Troy's Levi Brown.

Jarrett Brown threw with the zip and general accuracy that had impressed me at the Senior Bowl. He drove the ball on the dig, slant and out-routes and had good accuracy and trajectory on the post-corner and deep ball. One point of significant concern is that he is still quite rough in dropping back from center. He gains good depth with his two first steps, but they're slow. His next three steps are rushed and clumsy. However, he sets up and has a compact delivery. No passer in the first session had the same explosive zip out of their hand as Brown.

Levi Brown was slightly less impressive with his overall accuracy, but nonetheless stood out in this marginal group. He drove the ball with authority, showing good accuracy and zip on underneath routes. He also threw with good trajectory on the deeper routes. He consistently hit his man, but at times forced them to break stride.

The lack of preferred arm strength exposed at the Senior Bowl by Oregon State's Sean Canfield was again seen here. Canfield has good accuracy and timing. He was one of the few passers able to consistently hit his receiver in stride, and was able to "drop it in the bucket" on the post-corners -- one of the more difficult throws. However, on any pass longer than 10 yards, Canfield's passes have too much arc.

The quarterbacks who threw were: West Virginia's Jarrett Brown, Troy's Levi Brown, Oregon State's Sean Canfield, Penn State's Daryll Clark, Appalachian State's Armanti Edwards, BYU's Max Hall, Western Michigan's Tim Hiller and Northwestern's Mike Kafka.
Posted on: January 30, 2010 12:42 pm
 

Players to watch in Senior Bowl

You've read (or heard) us say how much more important the week of practice at the Senior Bowl is than the game, itself.

And while it is true that 90% of the scouts, coaches and front office excecutives that were in Mobile this week have now left, don't think that many of them will miss tuning in to the game (4 pm EST, NFL Network).

All players have an opportunity to help themselves with a strong performance today, but quarterbacks, running backs, and linebackers have historically gained the most.

Tim Tebow , of course, will get most of the attention, but be sure to check out the other South passers. West Virginia's Jarrett Brown could put a emphatic end to the week with a strong performance today and Oklahoma State's Zac Robinson has certainly flashed.

Because I promised myself I wouldn't write two consecutive sentences about #15, here's my final one -- don't pay so much attention to his elongated release (which remains the same it has always been), but instead to his ability to take the snap from center and accuracy downfield, as these were the two elements in which Tebow made consistent strides over the week.

It will be interesting, as well, to see if any sort of consistency comes from the North passers. Due to his mobility, Central Michigan's Dan LeFevour might be able to shake free some of the rust that hindered him this week. Cincinnati's Tony Pike has the arm to dazzle, but hasn't been able to string together more than a few completions in a row. Oregon State's Sean Canfield has struggled to get passes on a line outside the hashes due to a marginal arm strength, but throws a pretty ball down the seam and deep. If he can connect on a big one, he could leave Mobile with a positive.

The most dynamic running back this week of practice has clearly been Ole Miss' Mr. Everything Dexter McCluster . I haven't written about him, however, as the week of practice -- in which defenders were clearly instructed not to wrap up -- is perfectly suited to the elusive speedster's game. Now, don't get me wrong, McCluster showed remarkable strength and balance throughout his monster season in the SEC and may have a strong game today, but it will be tougher for him to break free for the 70 yarders that he was routinely zipping through in practice.

With defenders able to actually tackle backs, it will be interesting to see how the power backs Anthony Dixon (Mississippi State) and LaGarrette Blount (Oregon) fare. Be sure to watch for Wayne State's Joique Bell , who quietly helped himself this week and I wrote about as a one of the "honorable mention " risers from the week of practices.

Attempting to make the tackle on this blend of size, speed and power and shiftiness is a solid, but unspectacular class of linebackers. I'm particularly interested to see how effectively Missouri's Sean Weatherspoon , TCU's Daryl Washington , Florida State's Dekoda Watson and Washington's Donald Butler are able to fight through blocks and make open field stops close to the line of scrimmage, rather than downfield.

One final to note -- watch out for USC safety Taylor Mays to make an impact as a hitter in this game. As the opposite of McCluster, Mays' game is in the ferocity of his hitting, not the mobility he shows in coverage. Considering that he wasn't allowed to hit much over the week of practice, it isn't the least bit surprising that some feel he's struggled. The reality, is that Mays has been the same player this week as he's always been - the preeminent intimidator over the middle of at least the past ten years.
Posted on: January 27, 2010 6:26 pm
 

Jarrett Brown, Zac Robinson step it up

Despite all of the attention heaped upon Tim Tebow, West Virginia's Jarrett Brown and Zac Robinson more than held their own Wednesday, each enjoying their strongest practices of the week.

Brown, the West Virginia passer with only one year of starting experience, has proven the most consistent South quarterback over the week's practices. For those that haven't yet seen him, Brown is far from another version of Wildcat-specialist Pat White. Brown has a quick release and a strong arm and was fearless Wednesday, attacking all levels of the field despite having already secured his status as one of the risers from this week's action. His strong performance and legitimate upside may have boosted his status into the late 2nd or early 3rd round.

Cowboys' quarterback Zac Robinson was very good throughout most of practice before throwing two interceptions to former teammate Perrish Cox to close the show. Robinson has shown above average touch all week and showed more willingness to fire passes with authority today. He was especially improved on quick outs and slant routes, threading the needle against tight coverage often. As improved as he looked Wednesday, however, scouts would like to see him hit his receivers in stride more consistently. Too often, they had to slow or adjust their bodies to make the catch, limiting their potential for yards-after-the-catch opportunities. 


Posted on: January 27, 2010 6:15 pm
 

Tebow "pretty damn impressive" Wednesday

After two days of mostly inconsistent performances, the South quarterbacks -- Tim Tebow, Jarrett Brown and Zac Robinson -- each were markedly improved Wednesday.

Tebow, of course, remains the national story and was the biggest surprise to scouts to play so well Wednesday, widely felt to be the week's most important practice.

As one longtime scout told me following practice, Tebow "was pretty damn impressive" today.

Another forecasted that Tebow's big name and brewing confidence could easily result in his enjoying a MVP-performance in Saturday's game.

His elongated throwing motion remains a concern, but there was a night and day improvement today in his accuracy. Tebow zipped slants, threw with touch down the seam and completed various deep balls, including one to down the sideline over Kentucky cornerback Trevard Lindley that was as perfectly placed as Brett Favre's touchdown pass to Sidney Rice that began the Vikings' scoring against Dallas in the NFL Divisional playoffs two weeks ago. Hitting his receiver () in full stride, with perfect trajectory and over the outside shoulder, the pass couldn't have been throw better.

The rapid improvement over the past three days will force scouts to re-think their preconceptions about how quickly Tebow could adapt to the NFL.


Posted on: October 13, 2009 9:54 pm
 

Draft Slant Preview

I try to preview each week's issue of Draft Slant, NFLDraftScout.com's weekly PDF on this forum. I realize that for some of you, this is unnecessary, as you've ordered the entire series. For others, you may simply not care. I list the players we focused on per week for those readers who might be looking for certain prospects or who happened to watch similar games and want to compare notes with my fellow senior analyst Chad Reuter and I...

This week's Draft Slant features:

Oklahoma State OT Russell Okung as the Player of the Week (moments of brilliance, struggle against Big 12's leading pass rusher)
Eastern Washington TE Nathan Overbay as the Diamond in the Rough (soft hands, questions about speed, blocking ability)

The eight others earning writeups include:

Florida State OLB Dekoda Watson (Michael Boulware, Tommy Polley clone?)
Connecticut DE Lindsey Witten (7 sacks in first two games a mirage?)
West Virginia QB Jarrett Brown (Pro-style QB only needs more time?)
Alabama OG Mike Johnson (Powerful blocker emerging with Andre Smith now in the NFL)
Arizona CB Devin Ross (Athletic cover corner capable of moving into Top 64?)
LSU DE Rahim Alem (Lack of big plays called out in loss to Florida)
TCU ILB Daryl Washington (Surprising physicality, instincts at ILB, but does he have the size to remain there?)
Fresno State WR Seyi Ajirotutu (Second coming of Legedu Naanee?)

Those interested in ordering a single issue or the entire series of Draft Slant can click here .
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com