Tag:John Schneider
Posted on: April 19, 2011 1:12 pm
 

Seahawks would like to trade down; won't go far

The Seattle Seahawks held a pre-draft press conference yesterday with general manager John Schneider fielding questions from the local media.

Among the topics he addressed was the report from Peter King of Sports Illustrated that "Seattle wants to trade down so bad from 25 that John Schneider can taste it."

Rather than dismiss it - as many general managers would do at this point in the cloak and dagger pre-draft season, Schneider expanded upon it, explaing that, "Personally, I’d like to move back. I have confidence in our ability in those middle rounds to do some good stuff.”

Presumably, the Seahawks would like to move down to recoup the third round pick they gave up last year for the rights to quarterback Charlie Whitehurst.

And therein lies the irony of the situation.

It is the fact that Whitehurst is the only quarterback currently on the Seattle roster that makes it unlikely that Seattle will look to trade down too far on draft day, if they are able to land a deal in the first place. As I pointed out in a previous blog post, teams are expecting the contract rules to remain the same for this draft as they have been in the past. Now, this could change when a new CBA is signed, but teams generally go by the rules that have been in place, rather than projecting the new rules that could occur.

That means that the maximum number of years in a contract for a first round pick drafted between No. 16 and No. 32 is a five year deal. Players drafted No. 33 or later, however, can only receive a four-year contract.

Should Seattle be attempting to trade down with the hopes of landing a quarterback -- as some believe to be the case -- they won't want to trade out of the first round. The value of the extra year of the rookie deal is simply too valuable -- especially when dealing with a quarterback likely to spend at least the first year of the deal on the sideline.

It is the same reason why some of the teams in the top of the second round who may want to take a quarterback -- the Bills, Bengals, Cardinals, Titans, 49ers, Jaguars, etc. -- may ultimately have to trade up into the late first round to take the player who might have been available to them if they'd stayed put. In this wacky year, teams aren't just competing against each other for the rights to players, they want the longer, potentially cheaper contract for grooming their quarterbacks of the future.


Posted on: March 29, 2010 1:17 pm
 

Bradford lights it up in pro day

NFLDraftScout.com Senior Analyst Rob Rang attended the much-anticipated pro day for QB Sam Bradford this morning. 21 teams were officially in attendance, including the main players in the Bradford sweepstakes: St. Louis Rams General Manager Billy Devaney and head coach Steve Spagnuolo, and Washington Redskins General Manager Bruce Allen.

Bradford did nothing today to hurt his chances of being a top five pick. He completed 62 of 63 passes on the day, first warming up with his receivers before running through a 50-pass scripted session. The routes to be run were passed out to teams before the event started so they knew exactly what to expect. Bradford was crisp and accurate, with no signs of any problems with the shoulder injury that knocked him out for most of the 2009 season. He did not run or perform any other drills during the workout.

The only incompletion on the day came when senior receiver Adron Tennell dropped the fourth pass of the session, a slant placed right on his hands.

Other NFL personnel in attendance included Cleveland Browns President Mike Holmgren and head coach Eric Mangini, Seattle Seahawks General Manager John Schneider and head coach Pete Carroll, Buffalo Bills General Manager Buddy Nix, as well as San Francisco Director of Player Personnel Trent Baalke and head coach Mike Singletary.

It's no surprise full contingents from these teams looking for quarterbacks made the trip to Oklahoma to see if Bradford's shouder is ready to go.

Watch for Rob's article fully detailing the workout later today on NFLDraftScout.com.

--Chad Reuter

Posted on: March 21, 2010 9:49 pm
Edited on: March 21, 2010 9:58 pm
 

Does Carroll shares Holmgren's view on Clausen?

The Seahawks' decision to flip second round picks and give their third round pick of the 2011 draft to the San Diego Chargers for third-string quarterback Charlie Whitehurst has been characterized by some as the most aggressive move of the off-season.

Perhaps head coach Pete Carroll and general manager John Schneider made the move based in part because they felt the same about Notre Dame quarterback Jimmy Clausen, as former Seahawk head coach and current Cleveland Browns' president, Mike Holmgren does.

Holmgren admitted in a conversation about Clausen that he "wished I liked him more."

The Seahawks, like the Browns, needed a young quarterback. Citing this need, I projected them to take Clausen with the sixth overall pick in my mock draft.

If one is to presume for a moment that it is true that Seattle shared the same feeling about Clausen, the decision to ship the two picks to the Chargers and reward the unproven Whitehurst with a two-year, eight million dollar deal makes more sense. Whitehurst, a former third round pick, has never attempted a regular season pass in four years in San Diego. He's hardly been more impressive during the preseason either, completing 52.8% of his passes for 1,031 yards and five touchdowns. He's also thrown 7 interceptions.

Of course, it could be true that the Seahawks like Clausen -- and would be willing to take him with the sixth overall pick -- but simply weren't confident he'll be there. The Washington Redskins, after all, own the fourth overall pick and Mike Shanahan is thought likely to be considering taking a young quarterback in the draft.

However, if the Seahawks liked Clausen that much, they could have offered Washington the same picks they used in acquiring Whitehurst to go get the Notre Dame star. Pete Carroll certainly knows Clausen. He recruited him and has noted that he's "watched Jimmy throw since he was a 9th grader."

Doing a deal to move up for Clausen shouldn't have been difficult.

As Mike Sando of ESPN.com notes in this blog post , the value of the Seahawks' picks used for Whitehurst comes to 270 points.

Seattle's first pick, the sixth overall, is worth 1600 points according to a draft trade chart given to me by an NFL team. Washington's pick, the fourth overall, is worth only 200 points more.

The Seahawks could have traded the sixth pick and their second round selection (40th overall) to the Redskins in exchange for the fourth overall and the Redskins third round pick (approx. 68). The deal would have made the Redskins a net profit of 50 points.

It could be that Seattle was worried that the Redskins would refuse to do a deal.

Or, the simpler explanation, was the new Seattle staff felt the same about Jimmy Clausen as the leader of the old regime and elected to get their quarterback of the future by trade.

 
 
 
 
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