Tag:Trindon Holliday
Posted on: February 25, 2012 5:00 pm
 

Official 40 times? Watch Combine with an asterisk

INDIANAPOLIS - As the skill position players prepare to take their shot at breaking the 40-yard dash record Sunday in the most anticipated annual event at the Scouting Combine, confusion continues to permeate the instant results.
  
NFL.com is reporting the times, first an "unofficial" clocking shortly after prospects run and later an "official" time. A source told NFLDraftScout.com that the first clocking is a hand-held time and the second comes from National Football Scouting, which conducts the event and distributes the official reports to NFL teams.
  
Of the 36 offensive linemen NFLDraftScout.com noted unofficial and official times for Saturday, 33 had slower times in the official listing, three were the same and none were listed as faster than their unofficial timing. Sixteen players had an official time at least a tenth of a second slower than their official time, led by Georgia's Cordy Glenn, who dropped 0.19 seconds from a blistering 4.96 to a 5.15, still highly impressive for a 345-pound man.
  
However, that's still not Glenn's "official" time.
  
Those who participate in the 40 run twice, and on each run they are timed by two hand-held stopwatches and one electronic timer (that is actually initiated by hand on the player's first movement). Combine data put together for NFL teams by National Scouting includes all six of those times for each player, but no single official time.
  
That information isn't typically known for a week or two following the conclusion of the Combine, and it's not known what number is being provided to the NFL Network and NFL.com during the event.
  
It's an important asterisk to consider when the speedsters take the field at Lucas Oil Stadium on Sunday.
  
While Chris Johnson is widely reported to hold the Combine "record" in the 40-yard dash, documented data by NFLDraftScout.com shows Trindon Holliday's 4.21 in 2010 to be the fastest clocking since 2000 (Johnson ran a 4.24 in 2008). The fastest verifiable time in Combine history was a 4.12 by Bo Jackson in 1986 on manual stopwatches in the Superdome.
  
Saturday's 40 action was topped by Oklahoma tight end James Hanna, who posted a 4.49, according to NFL.com. Georgia's Orson Charles, who lifted 225 pounds a staggering 35 times on Friday, chose not to run the 40.

Posted on: February 28, 2010 9:41 am
 

There is no "official" time in the 40-yard dash

It is easy to be confused by the wide range of times being reported for players' 40-yard dash times. LSU's Trindon Holliday, for example, had been reported by some as having been timed as low as 4.22 seconds and as high as 4.34 seconds. Obviously a pretty significant disparity.

It's important to understand what happens to get the 40 times at the combine:

. Those who participate in the 40 actually run twice, and on each run they are timed by two hand-held stopwatches and one electronic timer (that is actually initiated by hand on the player's first movement.

. Combine data put together for NFL teams by National Scouting includes all six of those times for each player, but no single official time.

Team scouts and coaches have various approaches for getting the 40 time they use from those six timings. Some use averages. Some throw out slowest and fastest and then average the rest. Some ignore the whole thing and use a time taken by their own scout.

However, beware any 40-yard time that is labeled as "official" from the combine. In deference to the players, NFLDraftScout.com uses the best verifiable -- or listed -- time from the combine unless it is conspicuously skewed from the other times, which happens when a hand timer has an itchy trigger finger on the stopwatch. However, the times are usually well grouped.


Posted on: February 7, 2010 12:51 pm
This entry has been removed by the administrator.

Post Deleted by Administrator

This message has been removed by the administrator.

Posted on: February 2, 2010 11:13 am
 

SEC's Jones and Jones stand out on film

I've been focusing on writing player profiles for in advance of the Combine for NFLDraftScout.com and the upcoming issue of Lindy's NFL Draft Preview. This week I've been working on the safeties and two juniors from the SEC have stood out.

LSU's Chad Jones is an extremely athletic prospect who sources tell me could "shock the world" when he works out. Characterized by some close to the LSU program as the team's best athlete (remember, this team features Trindon Holliday...), scouts feel that he, while a bit unpolished, could ultimately rank as one of the top safeties from this exceptional class. He had became a full-time starter in 2009, but is being characterized by some as big enough to play linebacker and athletic to even see time at cornerback. He's also proven to be quite the pitcher, as this video proves .

His namesake, Georgia's Reshad Jones, is a similarly gifted athlete. An extremely highly touted prep prospect out of the state of Georgia, Jones quickly developed into a standout and unlike his LSU counterpart, leaves having started each of the past three years. Unfortunately, he is most known by some for his missed tackle that led Georgia Tech defeating the Bulldogs two years ago. Since, he's developed into a surer open field tackler and has always demonstrated very good ball skills.

With all of the attention being heaped upon All-Americans Eric Berry, Taylor Mays and Earl Thomas, these two haven't earned the attention from the media that they'll be soon be getting from NFL scouts.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com