Tag:Terrelle Pryor
Posted on: June 21, 2011 11:02 am
Edited on: June 21, 2011 2:17 pm
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Posted on: June 14, 2011 6:24 pm
 

Rosenhaus will earn his $ if Pryor goes 1st round

Former Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor made his first public appearance after leaving the Buckeyes today, flanked by superagent Drew Rosenhaus.

Quite frankly, I didn't find the short press conference to be particularly interesting and had hoped to ignore it completely, until Rosenhaus described his newest client as a player he expects to be a "first round pick."

Now, don't get me wrong. Rosenhaus is simply doing his job as an advocate for his client, but whatever respect I may have had for Rosenhaus' talent evaluation just went out the window.

Pryor has proven himself to be a quality collegiate quarterback, but hasn't demonstrated the accuracy, understanding or technique needed to be a starting caliber quarterback in the NFL. He is a 3rd string developmental quarterback at best. He's got a littany of off-field issues that NFL teams will have very little time in which to investigate. I've spoken to several NFL teams about him and have found it difficult to find anyone willing to stick up for him. There is a similar sentiment surrounding Pryor as there was last April when I, after consulting with league sources, predicted that Ryan Mallett would slip into the third round based largely off of questions about his character and ability to lead an NFL franchise.

Drew and his brother Jason Rosenhaus have built their agency into one of the most successful in the industry. They've done a terrific job of getting their clients good deals and are often credited with helping boost the stock of some of their clients with their creative and effective use of the media.

Some characterized Rosenhaus' ability to manipulate the media (and, by extension the NFL) as genius when it came to pumping up the stock of Willis McGahee, among others.

If Rosenhaus is able to convince a team to use a first round pick from the 2011 supplemental draft on Pryor it will be his most impressive feat, yet.


Posted on: June 7, 2011 9:23 pm
 

Terrelle Pryor indeed leaving Ohio State early

Quarterback Terrelle Pryor has informed new Ohio State head coach Luke Fickell that he will be leaving the Buckeyes and through his attorney, Larry James of Crabb, Brown and James LLP of Columbus, has confirmed the decision through the media, as well.

The story, which was originally broken by Doug Lesmerises of the Cleveland Plain-Dealer, isn't a surprise to many considering the hot water Pryor has found himself in following investigations by Ohio State and the NCAA due to Pryor accepting inappropriate benefits from a local tattoo parlor and automobile dealership.

As I reported last weekend, however, it does come as a surprise to some in the NFL, as two high level sources with different teams questioned Pryor's readiness to make the jump to the NFL.

Pryor's statement, read by James over the telephone, included:

"In the best interests of my teammates, I have made the decision to forgo my senior year of football at the Ohio State University."

In a typical year, Pryor's next step would be to simply apply to the NFL for special admission into the supplemental draft, typically held each July.

With the lockout, however, this year has been anything but typical and despite the fact that my colleague Len Pasquarelli of The Sports XChange reported that the supplemental draft is covered by the prior CBA, some question if the NFL will indeed be able to conduct the special draft next month if a new deal isn't agreed to.

Regardless of when Pryor is made eligible for drafting, he could be waiting for awhile.

As I noted in my article on Pryor's possible jump into the supplemental draft, the Buckeye quarterback isn't viewed as highly by these two NFL sources as some might believe based on the amount of hype he's received since signing with Ohio State. One source characterized Pryor as a "mid-round pick at best" and another described him as a "basketball player playing football."

It only takes one team to fall in love with a player, but contacting other sources throughout the league since today's story broke, the consensus seems to be that Pryor has a better chance of going undrafted than he does of being the first round pick many prematurely billed him as when he signed with Ohio State.
Posted on: June 4, 2011 4:45 pm
 

Scout: Terrelle Pryor a mid-round pick at best

There has been a great deal of speculation that Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor would make the jump to the NFL via the July supplemental draft, but I spoke with two NFL sources in the past few days that believe Pryor would be making a mistake in doing so.

One source characterized Pryor as a "mid-round pick at best" if he were to enter the supplemental draft. Both sources questioned whether the Buckeye passer had the poise and accuracy to be successful in the NFL.

Perhaps just as interesting is the fact that both sources had reservations about the 6-6, 235 pound Pryor's ability to make the transition from quarterback to wide receiver or any other position in the NFL. Pryor was characterized as a "basketball player playing football" and one whose lack of maturity could make it difficult for him to find a niche in the pro game despite his obviously unique combination of size and athleticism.

Pryor, of course, was suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season after it was discovered that he and several teammates had received free tattoos in exchange for memorabilia gained from playing at Ohio State.

Pryor is currently rated as NFLDraftScout.com's No. 4 senior quarterback prospect and a 2nd-3rd round value. The NFL sources were considerably lower on him, however, and weren't shy with their concerns.

Said one scout, “He [Pryor] is a nice college player playing in a system that caters to his strengths. He’s a basketball player playing football, though, when it comes to the NFL. He’s not a quarterback. He doesn’t have the makeup, the release or the accuracy for it. And he isn’t one of those guys that you can make into another position. He’s going to run well and people are going to get excited about him, but he isn’t a football player. What you’ve seen at Ohio State – on the field and off – is what you get with him.”

I sent in the initial article to my editors today and expect to see the finished product on NFLDraftScout.com on Monday.



Posted on: June 2, 2011 2:06 pm
Edited on: June 2, 2011 8:46 pm
 

Lockout means Supp. prospects may not slip

Jim Tressel's resignation has fueled a great deal of speculation that five of his former players might make the jump into the NFL's supplemental draft.

I've been asked by many as to my thoughts on QB Terrelle Pryor, OT Mike Adams, RB Dan Herron, WR Devier Posey and DE Solomon Thomas and how each might project to the NFL.

When the initial news broke in December that these players were going to be suspended, I argued that Adams was the most intriguing pro prospect of the bunch at the time. Adams is NFLDraftScout.com's No. 2 rated senior offensive tackle heading into the season.

One of the points I tried to make to others writing stories on the "Ohio State five" and any other potential supplemental draft prospects is that historically players drafted in July have a tendency to slip further than their grades might indicate. Put simply, teams are hesitant to give up April draft picks for players selected in the Supplemental Draft. Often players would slip a round or two further down the board in July than where they would have been picked in April.

Due to the lockout, however, this year's Supplemental Draft could be different, if NFL sources are to believed.

The primary reason why supplemental prospects have a tendency to drop, I'm told, is that typically they are far behind the rookies drafted in April. The April rookies generally have a significant advantage over any players drafted in July as they typically have been able to participate in a few mini camps.

That, of course, has not yet occurred for the Class of 2011 rookies, as they and veteran players haven't had any sustained contact with their NFL coaching staffs.

Therefore, the disadvantage that supplemental prospects would typically have is gone, making any who apply to the NFL for special eligibility this year potentially graded (and drafted) higher than they would in most July drafts.
Posted on: December 23, 2010 11:39 pm
 

Suspended or not, Pryor, others should return

The NCAA's harsh reaction to Ohio State players Terrelle Pryor, Daniel "Boom" Herron, Devier Posey, Mike Adams and Solomon Thomas ' foolish decisions to pawn game-worn gear and memorabilia for cash and tatoos could push the five players into an even worse decision -- declaring early for the NFL draft.

I certainly understand the argument for the players to enter the draft early. After all, taking five games away from them next season leaves them precious little time to boost their draft stock or resurrect whatever legacy they've tarnished at Ohio State.

The harsh reality, however, is that these fives Buckeyes simply aren't ready for the NFL, especially quarterback Terrelle Pryor .

Pryor, of course, is the man most expected to leave early following this ruling. Yet, he's the one who has the most to lose by coming out before he's ready. While scouts can't ignore his 6-6, 235 pound frame and wonderful athleticism, they also won't ignore his struggles reading defenses, tendency to throw late over the middle and, most of all, his marginal accuracy.

There may be a team willing to gamble on his spectacular upside (especially considering the success Michael Vick is having this season) in the first round, but a Top 32 pick is no guarantee for Pryor despite his obvious talent and hype.

Should he return, however, with Andrew Luck, Cameron Newton and Ryan Mallett likely already in the NFL, he'd enter the year (albeit five games late) among the top quarterback prospects. Finishing his senior season out strong and perhaps adding a game by attending the Senior Bowl and he'd be in prime position for a top pick in 2012.

While he'll likely be the least hyped of the five players in this ugly story, the most pro-ready of the group is actually left tackle Mike Adams . The 6-8, 305 pound Adams emerged as a force this season, earning First Team All-Big Ten honors in his first full season as the Buckeyes starter. Entering the year, however, he was not lock to win the starting job at all. Like Pryor, there is no denying Adams' upside, but with his balance, hand technique and awareness all question marks, he should return to iron out the wrinkles to his game. If he were to come out this year, considering the talent of this year's OT class, he'd likely be a 2nd or 3rd round pick. Returning, however, he'd rate among the top senior offensive tackle prospects in the country.

Posey and Thomas, strictly from a scouting standpoint, should return, as well.

The one possible exception is the running back, Herron. The reason he should consider leaving school early has nothing to do with the suspension and doesn't mean he's a spectacular prospect. In fact, if he comes out, I'll be surprised if he's drafted earlier than the 3rd round. However, running backs can only absorb so much punishment and with 454 "touches" already, scouts know what he can do.

I don't necessarily believe that Pryor, Adams or the others will heed my advice. The reaction from most of us in a similar situation as the one they find themselves in is to think, "the heck with it, I'm going pro." It is the reaction that some writers would take . It certainly is the reaction that most 20 or 21 year-olds with an inflated perception of their pro stock might take.

But in reality, these Buckeyes, while very talented, have a ways to go before they're ready for the NFL.

Remember that for complete draft coverage, be sure to check out NFLDraftScout.com or simply click here. 


Posted on: September 12, 2010 11:31 am
 

Tough day for top QB prospects

A simple scan of the box scores of the Washington-Syracuse, Stanford-UCLA, Ohio State-Miami and Arkansas-Louisiana (Monroe) games yesterday might be enough to tell you that the winnning quarterbacks in these games enjoyed their Saturday far more than the losing quarterbacks in the Florida State-Oklahoma and Idaho-Nebraska games.

Stat lines rarely tell the whole story, however, and they certainly don't in this case.

Despite impressive stat lines, I can tell you, after spending much of day and night Saturday reviewing their work, that nearly all of the QB prospects potentially available for the 2011 NFL draft struggled. And that none of them showed the consistent accuracy, pocket awareness or poise in a hostile environment (or all three) to lead an NFL team right now.

Which is good, because all of them obviously are collegiate prospects with at least a full calendar year until they'll be asked to do so.

In terms of numbers, one might say that Jake Locker (22/33, 289 yards, 4 TDs/0 INTs, 12 rushing yards) was the most impressive in the Huskies' 41-20 win over Syracuse.

Despite his impressive totals, however, the same accuracy issues that plagued Locker against BYU a week earlier were still there. His receivers, largely junior wideout Jermaine Kearse (9 receptions for 179 yards, 3 TDs) simply turned short and intermediate routes into big plays with good vision, tough running and underrated speed.

Still, for Locker, it was the second mediocre game of the season -- and the Huskies host Nebraska next Saturday.

Fellow senior prospect Christian Ponder (11/28, 113 yards, 0 TDs/2 INTs, 23 rushing yards) much more obviously struggled Saturday in front of a raucous crowd in Norman, Oklahoma. He had little time and was hurt by several drops from his receivers, but as the game slipped away in the second and third quarters, Ponder began to press. He threw the ball into coverage and, at times, allowed himself to peek at the rush rather than keeping his eyes downfield. With the weakest of this group's arms (though still plenty strong for the NFL), these mistakes only added to Florida State's struggles.

Of course, the senior quarterback prospect who struggled the most was Idaho's Nathan Enderle . As I mentioned in my previous blog post, Enderle was among the five senior prospects I was closely scouting yesterday. No one expected the Vandals to walk into Lincoln and shock the Cornhuskers, but Enderle clearly struggled with the speed and physicality of his opponent. He finished 16/31, 141 yards, 1 TD/5 INTs -- including two 40+ yard INTs returned for TDs on back to back drives in the second quarter.

The play from the underclassmen was certainly better than Enderle's, but, like Locker's statistics can be deceiving.

Arkansas' Ryan Mallett had an apparent field day against Louisiana-Monroe (28/43, 400 yards, 3 TDs/1 INT), but the same issues that concerned me before remain. Mallett has a tendency to not set his feet, relying on his admittedly very strong arm to thread the needle. Against this caliber of defense he can get away it. Against the Pittsburgh Steelers or Green Bay Packers? Not so much. Don't let his numbers fool you. Remember, Bobby Petrino's offense helped Brian Brohm (Packers) get drafted in the second round.

Even Heisman favorite (at least mine) Terrelle Pryor (12/27, 233 yards, 1 TD/0 INT, 113 rushing yards, 1 TD) wasn't as dazzling throughout the game as the highlights you may have seen would indicate. Pryor, like Mallett, is inconsistent in setting his feet before he throws. Like Locker, he simply isn't accurate enough at this point to consistently complete tough throws in the NFL. Too many of his passes sailed over the head or bounced a yard in front of his receivers. In Pryor's (and Locker's) defense, the threat of his running allows him to be less accurate a passer.

Because the game didn't start until 10:30 pm EST, many didn't see any of redshirt sophomore Andrew Luck's performance against UCLA. Luck was his typical efficient (11/24, 152 yards, 2 TDs/0 INTs, 63 rushing yards) self and his Cardinal team thoroughly dominated the Bruins on their way to a 35-0 shellacking in the Rose Bowl.

Even still, while protected by a stout offensive line and an underrated receiving corps, Luck missed several wide open targets, including going 0-3 on some easy passes in the Cardinals' first offensive series. His two touchdown throws were easy tosses that any quarterback with a hope of making the NFL would make.

And so what does the collective struggles of these talented quarterbacks prove?

That - newsflash - playing quarterback at the BCS level is very difficult.

And that there is still plenty of work to be done by all six prospects before they are ready for the NFL.

Posted on: July 12, 2010 12:40 pm
 

Luck, Kaepernick, others wow at Manning QB Camp

Each year the Mannings (Archie and sons Petyon, Eli and Cooper) hold their Manning Passing Academy for high school and collegiate "skill position" football players. Though running backs, wide receivers and tight ends are also invited to the camp, the quarterbacks always receive the most attention.

For the fifth consecutive year this year's camp was held on the Nicholls State University campus; the former home of the New Orleans Saints' training camp. This is the 14th year the Mannings have been holding their camp.

This year the collegiate quarterbacks invited read like a Who's Who of the game. Washington's Jake Locker was invited, but couldn't attend. Miami's Jacory Harris, Arkansas' Ryan Mallett and Ohio State's Terrelle Pryor were other high profile passers also unable to participate.

Among the more high profile players who did participate, however, included:

Jordan Jefferson - LSU
Jerrod Johnson - Texas A&M
Colin Kaepernick - Nevada
Case Keenum - Houston
Andrew Luck - Stanford
Greg McElroy - Alabama
Kellen Moore - Boise State
Christian Ponder - Florida State
Taylor Potts - Texas Tech
Matt Simms - Tennessee
Nathan Stanley - Mississippi
Brandon Weeden - Oklahoma State
Tyler Wolfe - Northwestern State (La.)
T.J. Yates - North Carolina

Much of the clinic is open to the public. According to sources in attendance, Stanford redshirt sophomore Andrew Luck is clearly the most gifted of the group. He showed a strong NFL-caliber arm and the accuracy to attack all levels of the field. Luck recently went on the record stating that he planned to graduate from Stanford before pursuing professional football.

Another young talent, Tennessee's Matt Simms (son of Phil, brother of Chris) also impressed, I'm told.

Kaepernick surprised some with his velocity. The 6-6, 220 pound Wolfpack quarterback is well known for his production (20 TDs/6 INTs, as well as 1,183 rushing yards, 16 TDs last year), but is viewed by many scouts as a product of coach Chris Ault's "pistol" offense.

FSU's Christian Ponder, who tied with Locker for the highest QB grade given by National scouts, was characterized as being good, but not spectacular. In Ponder's defense, he underwent shoulder surgery in the off-season and may have been still working out some of the kinks.


 
 
 
 
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