Tag:Tony Stewart
Posted on: May 26, 2011 6:20 pm
  •  
 

Tony Stewart focused on Charlotte

I can't tell if Tony Stewart was in a bad mood today or if he was just perturbed by the line of questioning. No Kyle Busch questions for him though.


TONY STEWART,  met with media and discussed practice, the workload of being in Charlotte for nearly 2 weeks, and more. Full Transcript:

ARE YOU GOING TO BE AT SPEED STREET TOMORROW NIGHT?
“Yes.”

WHAT’S PLAYING? WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO BE DOING?
“I have no idea. I’ll know when I get there.”

HAVE YOU BEEN A PART OF THAT IN THE PAST? WHAT SORT OF EXPERIENCE HAS IT BEEN?
“Yeah, but you’ve got to remember I’m more worried about trying to figure out what I’m doing in my race car right now. I’m worried about my race car. I’m not worried about all this other stuff. This is ‘Hell Week’ being in Charlotte. We don’t do anything but work all week for two and a half weeks. So, it’s non-stop. We’re just happy when we can be at the track and can finally get a break.”

MATT KENSETH SAID 600 MILES IS REALLY LONG WHEN YOU’RE CAR IS NOT DOING WHAT YOU WANT IT TO
“500 miles is a long time when you’re car’s not right. I’m not sure that we’re practicing in the heat of the day here for qualifying tonight; so that’s why we’ve got Saturday to work on the race stuff.”

WITH THIS HEAT, IS THERE ANYTHING THAT YOU CAN USE FROM LAST WEEK THAT YOU’RE GOING TO BRING OVER?
“Look in your archives. Every year everybody tells you ‘Yes’ on that. That’s what everybody says. That’s what everybody said last week. It’s the same answer this week. Log this answer for the rest of my life that yes, everything that we learned last week we will use toward this week for the rest of my life. That’s what we’ll do.”

OK

“That’s a given. Everybody is going to do that. Everybody is going to look off their notes last week because we’re running the same track two weeks in a row. And they’re both ending at night. So it’s as consistent as you can get. I know you have to ask but I have to answer it that way because I get tired of answering the same thing every May the same question.”

HOW IS KANSAS DIFFERENT FROM THIS TRACK IN YOUR APPROACH?
“It’s shaped different (laughs); it’s a whole different race track. Even the tracks that are shaped the same as Charlotte race differently. I mean Atlanta races different, Texas races different; and Kansas is totally shaped different than here. So it’s a whole different place.”

I KNOW IT’S SHAPED DIFFERENT, BUT HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FOR YOU? WHAT DO YOU DO DIFFERENTLY?
“The handling characteristics are different. Man, I don’t even know what kind of answer you want for that because it’s kind of far out there. I don’t even know when Kansas is compared to now.”

IT’S NEXT WEEK

“Okay, I don’t even know. Like I say, we’re worried about this week and not what we’re doing next week at Kansas or the week after that wherever we’re at then. We’ve got 600 miles we’re trying to work on this week.”

HOW IS YOUR CAR?
“I think it’s pretty good. I’m pretty happy with the balance so far in race trim. It’s just staying focused on what we’re doing. There have been so many distractions in the last week and a half, and everybody wants to talk about Kansas or something else that doesn’t pertain to anything that we’re doing right now, that it’s hard to focus on it.”

WITH YOUR OWNER’S HAT ON, CAN I ASK YOU ABOUT DANICA PATRICK?
“You can’t ask me anything about Danica. It doesn’t have anything to do with what I’m doing here today. If you have something to ask me about what we’re doing here today, feel free. And I’ll stay here as long as you want. Do you have anything else?

I’M GOOD.
“Okay.”


More NASCAR coverage
Category: Auto Racing
Tags: Tony Stewart
 
Posted on: May 12, 2011 11:33 am
Edited on: May 12, 2011 11:33 am
 

Stewart's charity race returns to Eldora

Posted by Pete Pistone


From News Release

The last thing any racecar driver wants to be called is “dirty,” but they’ll make an exception to this rule on Wednesday, June 8 when the most celebrated dirt track in all of motorsports hosts the Prelude to the Dream.

Eldora Speedway in Rossburg, Ohio, will once again be the site of the all-star dirt Late Model race featuring more than 25 world renowned drivers as they battle for dirt supremacy on the half-mile clay oval, all of which will be presented live to the entire nation on HBO Pay-Per-View® with proceeds from the telecast supporting four of the nation’s top children’s hospitals:

• Levine Children’s Hospital in Charlotte, N.C.: www.LevineChildrensHospital.org

• Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta: www.choa.org

• St. Louis Children’s Hospital: www.StLouisChildrens.org

• Children’s Medical Center Dallas: www.childrens.com

The seventh annual event will feature stars from the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, NASCAR Nationwide Series, NASCAR Camping World Truck Series and the NHRA Full Throttle Drag Racing Series. All will join two-time NASCAR Sprint Cup Series champion Tony Stewart in piloting 2,300-pound dirt Late Model stock cars capable of putting out more than 800 horsepower.

The live, commercial-free broadcast will begin at 8 p.m. EDT (5 p.m. PDT) with an immediate replay. HBO Pay-Per-View’s racing telecast has a suggested retail price of $24.95 and is available to more than 71 million pay-per-view homes. HBO Pay-Per-View is the leading supplier of event programming in the pay-per-view industry. Ordering information and up-to-the minute racing information is available at either www.PreludeToTheDream.org or www.HBO.com. Updates can also be found on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PreludeToDream and on Twitter at twitter.com/PreludetoDream

The Prelude to the Dream is a team event. There is still an individual race winner, but there is also a race within the race, with the field broken up into four teams, each representing a children’s hospital:

• Team Levine: Jimmie Johnson, Denny Hamlin, Bill Elliott, David Reutimann, Austin Dillon, Ray Evernham and Cruz Pedregon.

• Team Atlanta: Ryan Newman, Carl Edwards, Clint Bowyer, Joey Logano, Ken Schrader, David Gilliland and Ron Capps.

• Team St. Louis: Kyle Busch, Kasey Kahne, Bobby Labonte, Justin Allgaier, Kenny Wallace, Ron Hornaday and Ricky Carmichael.

• Team Dallas: Stewart, Matt Kenseth, Brian Vickers, Marcos Ambrose, Aric Almirola and Dave Blaney.

Each hospital will receive a donation, with the payout breakdown as follows:

• Winning team receives 30 percent of net proceeds raised from the pay-per-view telecast.

• Second-place team receives 25 percent of net proceeds raised from the pay-per-view telecast.

• Third- and fourth-place teams each receive 20 percent of net proceeds raised from the pay-per-view telecast.

The lowest team score wins, and only the top-five drivers from each team will be scored. For example, if Team Levine has finishes of first, fourth, seventh, 11th and 18th, respectively, from its top-five drivers, its score will be 41. In the event of a tie, the sixth driver will be scored.

“The team concept adds another level of excitement by having a race within the race,” said Stewart, owner of Eldora Speedway and three-time winner of the Prelude to the Dream. “As individual drivers, we all want the big trophy at the end of the night. But it’s cool knowing that battles for fourth and fifth and even 11th and 12th will make a big difference for what children’s hospital ends up with the big check.

“We plan to raise a lot of money for all of these hospitals, no matter where their teams finish. Since HBO Pay-Per-View began televising the Prelude in 2007, we’ve been able to help a lot of deserving charities, and helping children has always been a part of that mission. With this format, and with the hospitals involved, we feel we have our best chance yet to make this year’s Prelude our most successful one to date.”

The four charities – Levine Children’s Hospital, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, St. Louis Children’s Hospital and Children’s Medical Center Dallas – all cater to the medical needs of children.

The six previous Prelude to the Dream events have collectively raised more than $3 million. With each year’s event gaining significant stature and mainstream interest, Stewart’s ultimate goal is to have the 2011 Prelude to the Dream raise $1 million, with the proceeds impacting the four charities.

“It’s an ambitious goal,” admits Stewart, “but if we don’t set the bar high, we’re not pushing ourselves the way we should. That’s our goal, and me and everybody else associated with this event is going to do everything we can to meet that goal. Now, we just need everyone out there to purchase the event, enjoy all the action going on at Eldora, and know that their dollars are going to a very worthy cause.”

Drivers from all types of disciplines, some with lots of dirt track experience and others with hardly any, will participate in qualifying, heat races and a 30-lap feature, all of which will be televised live on HBO Pay-Per-View.

“For the fifth year in a row we will bring live action from Eldora into living rooms across the country,” said Tammy Ross, vice president, HBO Pay-Per-View & Sports. “With this year’s new start time and enhancing the format of the telecast, race fans will have a chance to settle in at home and prepare for a great night of continuous, live racing action.”

“With no points and no pressure, the Prelude to the Dream is a throwback race, allowing drivers to step back in time and compete for the reasons they all went racing in the first place – pride and a trophy. And they’ll do it on the same surface that racing legends A.J. Foyt and Mario Andretti competed on nearly 50 years ago.

  

More NASCAR coverage
Category: Auto Racing
Posted on: May 7, 2011 10:16 am
 

Stewart, Hamilton ride swap official

Posted by Pete Pistone

NASCAR star Tony Stewart and Formula One champion Lewis Hamilton will officially swap rides in an exhibition ride next month at the legendary Watkins Glen International Raceway:

From Track News Release

Mobil 1 is bringing Formula 1 World Champion driver Lewis Hamilton and two-time NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Champion Tony Stewart together to swap race cars at the legendary Watkins Glen International in the Finger Lakes Region of New York. This exhibition builds upon Mobil 1's more than three decades of supporting motorsports champions and globally renowned race teams. The Mobil 1 Car Swap will take place on Tuesday, June 14. Hamilton will take laps in Stewart's #14 Mobil 1/Office Depot Chevrolet Impala and Stewart will climb into the cockpit of the team Vodafone McLaren Mercedes MP4-23. The drivers will drive each other's car on the long course at The Glen, experiencing the 3.4-mile, 11-turn lap course.

 

Category: Auto Racing
Posted on: March 6, 2011 8:40 pm
Edited on: March 6, 2011 8:43 pm
 

Stewart, Montoya post Las Vegas comments

Posted By Pete Pistone
 
Second and third place finishers in the Kobalt Tools 400 at Las Vegas Motor Speedway Tony Stewart and Juan Pablo Montoya met the media after Sunday's race:

TONY STEWART: Yeah, real disappointed. I honestly think we had the car to beat today, we just gave it away. I don't know what happened on the pit stop there, but we had a miscue and had a penalty and had to go to the back, and unfortunately it kind of dealt our cards for us. Darian made a good call getting us the track position back, but it also showed everybody else that they could do it, too, and we couldn't run two and a half runs on a set of left-side tires.

Just shot ourselves in the foot two weeks in a row now.

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: It was good. As Tony said, he had the fastest car, but our car was very good all day. We battled between sixth and eighth place and then a little bit better and a little bit better. It was good; we were getting better, but we just never closed in. We could make the car turn through the middle, we just couldn't touch the throttle and the other way around. It was just touch and go.

But it's good. You know, we really needed a good result after last week, and it was nice to get it here.

Q. Tony, I know you're disappointed, but can you take any solace in three races in a row you were in position, you may have had a shot to win?

TONY STEWART: I probably should, but that's not in my makeup. I mean, I just -- it kills me to throw a race away like that, especially at a place we haven't won at yet. This was a big deal today, and when you lead that many laps and have a car that's that fast and you lose it, you -- I'm sure tomorrow when the emotion dies down we'll look back and say it was a great weekend, but just man, it does not sit good right now.

THE MODERATOR: Tony did lead 163 laps.

Q. Can either or both of you talk about how difficult it was to run in traffic today? It seemed clean air was the only way, didn't seem like a lot of close racing at the very, very end.

TONY STEWART: I don't know what race you were watching. Juan and I raced pretty close at the end.

Q. You did catch him, yes.

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: I think his car was so good that he could pass anybody anywhere. I think mine was a little bit harder to pass in traffic. I don't know, the cleaner the air -- but that's normal; that's not new, is it? Every time you're in traffic, you suck; every time you're in clean air, you look hike a hero. That's normal.

Q. I meant after the pit stop, Tony.

TONY STEWART: I'm a driver, not a....

Q. Tony, two tires didn't work here last year for Jeff and it didn't work for you last week. Why did it work today? You went on two tires and took off. Was your car that much better it didn't matter?

TONY STEWART: I just think we had a good car.  I mean, my car was -- when we could get out front we were really good, and even when we weren't out front, the guys that were -- at that time one of the fastest cars was the 16 car, and him and I ran through traffic together there. So guys could pass, it was just -- we had a really, really balanced car.

It didn't seem like it mattered what we did. Our car was best on old tires. We were fast on the front, but the last half of the run we could just march away from everybody and leave them.

Q. Juan, as you go on season to season now in these cars, can you just talk about since you've been in here do you feel more accepted? What is your take in terms of being in this discipline?

JUAN PABLO MONTOYA: I think I've been accepted from day one. I think actually before I could have gone and asked people and they would tell me anything, and now I don't think they tell me as much, so that has changed. That's a positive, I guess, in a way.

But no, for me it's just more comfortable. I think the last two, three years have been very comfortable with these cars, and it shows. When we can get the car working, it works really good. I think last year when they went from the wing to the spoiler I think it really affected me and we really struggled, and we did a lot of work over the winter with the new nose to make sure that didn't happen, and I don't know, here we are. It's good.

 

More NASCAR coverage
Posted on: February 28, 2011 12:13 pm
Edited on: February 28, 2011 12:14 pm
 

Stewart to drive F-1 car

Posted By Pete Pistone

Tony Stewart had a top ten finish Sunday in the Subway Fresh Fit 500 at Phoenix International Raceway behind the wheel of his familiar No. 14 Sprint Cup Chevrolet.

But later this summer the two-time series champion will get an opportunity to drive a completely different kind of racing machine.

Stewart and Formula One star Lewis Hamilton will swap rides for an exhibition run at historic Watkins Glen International Raceway.

“I’ve been banging on this since I got here, I said we need to do this at this at The Glen," WGI track president Michael Printup told "The Leader." "This would be fantastic if we could pull it together. If there are no hiccups, Watkins Glen is ready.”

Speculation is the run could take place in early June when the Formula One Series visits North American for the only time this season and the Grand Prix of Canada in Montreal. 

Most recently Jeff Gordon and Juan Pablo Montoya turned a similar trick at Indianapolis Motor Speedway when Montoya was competing full-time on the F-1 circuit.

Stewart is obviously no stranger to open wheel racing as a former Indy Car Series champion but the high-powered F-1 cars are a long way from the IRL machine Stewart piloted more than a decade ago.

As for Hamilton, there is no comparison to the kind of vehicle he drives for a living and the 3,400 pound Cup car.

 

Category: Auto Racing
Posted on: February 19, 2011 5:01 pm
Edited on: February 19, 2011 5:14 pm
 

Nationwide Series -- Daytona highlights

Tony Stewart won the season-opening Nationwide Series race at Daytona for the fourth straight season. Here are some video highlights from the race.








More NASCAR coverage


Posted on: February 18, 2011 8:48 pm
 

Stewart: New drafting gives drivers more control

Listen to audio (18 minutes, 7 seconds) or read transcript below


TONY STEWART, NO. 14 OFFICE DEPOT/MOBIL 1 CHEVROLET met with media and discussed what the drivers have learned in the two two-car pairings, how the Nationwide and Cup Series differ, how the driving is back in the driver’s hands, and more. Full Transcript:

 

ON HIS WEEK SO FAR AND THE OUTLOOK FOR BOTH THE NATIONWIDE AND SPRINT CUP RACES

“It’s definitely been different. And we said that after the test session. We knew it was going to be different racing down here. But I’ve kind of enjoyed the part where we’re out of the pack and not sitting there just stuck in a line. You actually have the ability to help or hurt your cause, depending on who you get with and how quick you do the exchanges and how you play the runs on guys from being the third or fourth group back. So it’s a different style of racing and it’s definitely something we’ve had to adjust our mindset to for sure, and definitely have had to practice a lot of things that we’re seeing that seem to be changing daily on the race track with what it takes to go fast and be good here.”

 

THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES TODAY VOTED TO CONTINUE ALLOWING THE ARMY TO SPONSOR NASCAR. WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THAT VOTE? WHAT ARE YOUR CONCERNS ON THAT DISCUSSION?

“We’ll, we’re obviously pretty excited about that. I didn’t think that it would be anything different. But it’s obviously a program that works for them or they wouldn’t be a part of this sport. It’s been a very successful tool for the U.S. Army and luckily we get to continue that program with them. Definitely from the car owner’s side, that was good news today.”

 

WERE YOU WORRIED?

“You’re always worried when you don’t know what can happen. Anything that’s out of your control, you always worry about.”

 

NASCAR’S OBJECTIVE WHEN THEY MADE THE CHANGES TO SHRINK THE GRILL SIZE AND LOWER THE PRESSURE ON THE POP-OFF VALVES WAS TO BREAK UP SOME OF THESE TWO-CAR DRAFTS.  AND YET IN THE DUELS, WE SAW STILL CARS BEING ABLE TO PUSH EACH OTHER FOR SUSTAINED PERIODS OF TIME, PARTICULARLY THE FORDS. DO THE FORDS HAVE AN ADVANTAGE IN THEIR COOLING PACKAGE?

“I honestly don’t know the answer to that question. But I know that’s what NASCAR’s intention was (to break up the two-car drafts). It just shows how quickly everything can evolve. What drivers have figured out each day has progressed. It’s tough that NASCAR can’t predict how we’re going to react. The hard part is it hasn’t been able to accomplish what they were wanting to accomplish of getting guys out of that two-car deal. I don’t know necessarily that it’s a bad thing. I think it’s definitely different.

 

“And you don’t have 30 cars in a gigantic ball. But at the same time you look at how safe it’s been for the drivers. If somebody has a problem it’s normally been single car incidents out there with the exception of the Shootout the other night that I think had four or five cars involved in that one deal. But for the most part it’s been a lot safer for us from that aspect of it even though the speeds are up. The speeds haven’t been a drama. The pushing has taken some getting used to. Being pushed hasn’t been a big problem. It’s learning how to push and the visibility of it. That side of it has been a little tricky. That’s where we rely on the spotters a lot and I think everybody has learned how to make the adjustments to make it work.”

 

CAN YOU SPEAK A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THE DIFFERENCE THIS STYLE OF DRAFTING TO THE MASS PACK DRAFTING AS FAR AS THE PRECISION AND THE TIMING YOU HAVE TO EXERCISE WHEN YOU’RE DOING YOUR CHANGES?

“Yeah, it’s definitely put a lot more back into the driver’s hands, for sure. Where you’re at, with the partner you choose to run with out there at the time; where you place your car and where you make the changes, it’s all about what the drivers are doing. It’s not the car doing the exchanges anymore. I like that aspect of it. Historically in the past, it’s been just hoping you got in the right line and hope that it went forward enough that you could switch and go back and forth; kind of like being in a traffic jam. At least we’re out of the traffic jam now and have a little more control over our own destinies. I like the aspect that at least it’s put some of the driver back into the equation.”

 

FROM THE DAY JUNIOR JOHNSON FIGURED OUT THE DRAFT IN 1960, THERE HAVE ALWAYS BEEN GUYS WHO WERE GOOD AT DRAFTING. WHAT MAKES YOU GOOD AT THIS? WHAT MAKES A DRIVER A GOOD PLATE RACER OVER OTHER GUYS?

“I don’t know that I’m that good at it. I’m not sure if I’m not good at it or I just don’t know what day to be good at it. I’ve got Saturday figured out; I just can’t figure out Sunday. We’ve had really good luck in the Nationwide Series at this race and we’ve always been able to get ourselves close to the front when we needed to and sort it out from there; but trying to figure out what to do to convert that to a Sunday win has been the hard part. That’s been the hard part where you look over the past 12 years here and you say, okay, these are the opportunities we had and these were the missed opportunities and those are the ones that you set there and beat your head against the wall over trying to figure out what you could have done differently. We’ve seen Brian Keselowski get in yesterday. It’s hope that if you get in with the right guy that you do a good enough job you can get yourself in position to win the race.”

 

WHAT ABOUT TOMORROW’S RACE? DO YOU SEE IT BEING SIGNIFICANTLY DIFFERENT AS FAR AS HOW THE RACE IS GOING TO EVOLVE? WILL THERE BE SOME DRAFTING PACKS IN THAT RACE?

“I think so. We saw a little bit of it in practice. The difference is I’m not sure that there are as many people; you know where the Cup field, everybody’s doing it. On the Nationwide side, I don’t know that more than eight or 10 guys practiced that yesterday. So I think you will see some separation there. And I think you’re going to see guys that are going to be trying it for the first time in the race. That’s what the good part is about having Cup drivers is it helps teach those guys how to do the things they need to do to be a Cup driver. So it’s definitely going to be interesting. They knocked so much power out of them that it made it harder to pass yesterday and it seemed like it was a little easier for the cars to hook up, but I don’t know that they really took off and had the speed like we’re seeing with the Cup Series. It didn’t seem like when two cars got together they got as big a run and momentum.”

 

BACK IN 2004, THEY TRIED A DIFFERENT RULES PACKAGE AND YOU REALLY LIKED THAT. NOW WITH THE TWO-CAR PACK WE HAVE IS JUST CONVINCING FANS THAT GOOD RACING DOESN’T HAVE TO BE 40 CARS LINED UP IN ONE LONG FREIGHT TRAIN?

“That starts in this room (Media Center) right here. So you guys are the whole key to that. I don’t think it’s bad. It’s taking more skill to do what we’re doing now than ever before. There is an element of danger that we’ve never had before where you can’t see where you’re going. There is plenty of exciting stuff about what we’re doing and stuff to write about. You guys can bring that to the fans.”

 

HOW HAS THE CREW CHIEF’S ROLE CHANGED WITH THIS NEW PACKAGE?

“You probably should talk to a crew chief more than me. But what we did see yesterday is handling did become a factor. We got loose during the race and that’s the first time that we had the car do anything that we didn’t like over SpeedWeeks. I think if we have the same weather conditions that we’ve had the last two days on Sunday, I think handling will be a factor in it a little bit. It’s obviously not going to be as big of a factor as it’s been in the past but I think there is potential for handling in this package. By yourself, It’s not at all. Everybody in the Media Center can drive if you could get in one (laughter); but everybody could drive it around here. But the two-car part is where it gets a lot trickier. The front guy keeping the car straight and it’s harder to do it down the straightaways than it is in the corners; and then the guy in the back making sure that he’s smooth and not getting that front car out of shape. So there’s a lot of driving going on when you see two cars taking off by themselves.”

 

ON DYNAMICS WITH YOUR SPOTTER AND WHO MAKES THE CALLS ABOUT WHAT IS GOING ON BEHIND AND IN FRONT OF YOU WHEN IN A TWO CAR DRAFT?

“Teammates have been able to put their team car frequencies on each other’s radios and that has been a big help.  And in the case of Ryan and I we have used my spotter when the two of us have gotten together no matter where and who was in position.  And other teams have done the same thing and I don’t know if they have switched to whoever was leading at the time but you know as far as when you get with guys that are not on your team, instead of a direct link from driver to driver, it’s from driver to crew chief to the spotter, back to the other spotter back down to the driver so the spotters are really busy up there and you will see them shuffling around trying to find the guys that they are running with just to make sure that they can communicate that information as fast as possible.”

 

IS IT DISCONCERTING TO THE DRIVER THAT YOU HAVE TO RELY ON THE OTHER SPOTTER FOR THE DRIVER AHEAD OF YOU TO TAKE YOU THROUGH THE TRACK?

“It’s kind of what we have always done.  It’s not as exaggerated as in “Days of Thunder” obviously but we have always relied on spotters to get through things ahead of them but the thing that the spotters are having to do is to not drive the cars for us as much as to just let us know…..because they have to be the eyes for us around the backside of the car they are now having to do that around the front too.  Their role has become more crucial now in Speedweeks too.”

 

ON DALE EARNHARDT JR’S SUGGESTION THAT EVERYONE NEEDS TO GO DOWN TO TALLADEGA AND HERE AND DO A BIG TWO DAY TEST AND TRY A LOT OF STUFF TO CHANGE THIS TWO CAR STUFF

“If I remember right, when we came down for the open test he did single car runs the whole time he was here so if he felt that way, why didn’t he do that in the test while we were all here together? 

 

“We tried getting in big packs for three days down here and we couldn’t get people to quit doing single car runs and worrying about trying to make the race cars go fast.  In the big pack you want master of your own destiny……..I don’t know where he got that from because you have always been relying on the guy behind you so if you want to be the master of your own destiny, take the restrictor plates off.  Figure out how to let us drive race cars again.”

 

WHEN YOU ARE COMING DOWN TO THE END, DO YOU WANT TO BE THE GUY BEHIND OR IN FRONT?
“I am not going to give that secret away right now.  I would be more than happy to tell you what I think but I am not sure that I have totally sorted it all out as far as where you want to be.   I guess the good thing is what we saw in the Shootout is how things can be and can happen.  What you had are two guys that were leading the race is when Denny pulled out and got the run on Ryan and cleared him before the start/finish line but at the same time you had two cars that stayed together and they were able to keep that momentum on the outside so it’s really……….that last lap of the 500 is going to be critical as far as knowing not only what you are going to do if you are in that lead group but if you are that guy in second you have to really think about what the possibilities are of what can happen if you have that second group that is anywhere close then they have that shot and the guy in third could easily win the race if the guy in second makes the move to early.”

 

ON KEVIN HARVICK PROCLAIMING THAT HE THOUGHT THE GUYS RUNNING IN SECOND DURING THE GATORADE DUELS MADE THEIR MOVES TOO LATE AND YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT NOT WANTING TO MAKE YOUR MOVE TOO EARLY

“I think it depends on what is going on behind you.  I mean you can still…….they didn’t get by the guy that they were trying to get by but at the same time I think if you do it too soon you are going to break so much momentum that the guys that stay together……. just like in the Shootout when the 22 car came ripping around the outside and they stayed in line and carried that momentum.  When you get those two cars side-by-side……now not only are they not pushing each other but they are punching a bigger hole in the air and it helps that second pack get a run.”

 

ON THE NEW SURFACE AND THE DIFFERENCES FROM LAST YEAR TO THIS

“It's definitely polar opposites on the scale.  We went from a really wavy, bumpy surface that didn’t have a lot of grip to all the sudden a very perfectly smooth surface with a ton of grip so all the racing we used to do you can take all the notes and throw it out the window and none of it pertains to the cars that we are racing this time around.  It’s probably been one of the biggest changes as far as a track repaving that we have ever seen in history as far as when I have been in the sport as far as what you had and it being a total opposite package from the year before.  There wasn’t anything about it from last year that you could take to this year.”

More NASCAR coverage

Category: Auto Racing
Posted on: January 22, 2011 5:32 pm
Edited on: January 22, 2011 6:18 pm
 

Stewart's Australia troubles continue

Posted By Pete Pistone

Tony Stewart told the media earlier this week he was "ashamed" of what happened during an altercation with a track operator while competing in a series of Sprint Car races earlier this month and had hoped "to put things behind" and move on.

However it doesn't appear as if things will be that easy.

The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting Stewart's tirade with Brett Morris ended with the track-co-owner's broken eye socket courtesy of a helmet thrown at his face. The injury will necessitate minor surgery and according to the newspaper Stewart could potentially face charges.

The paper also reported Stewart was detained by local authorities after the altercation and held for a couple of hours to "reflect on the benefits of controlling his temper."

Stewart said during Thursday's media availability he would be willing to return to Australia to answer any question regarding the matter.

This week's annual NASCAR Sprint Media Tour is schedule to make a stop at Stewart-Haas Racing on Monday morning at which time the two-time series champion will no doubt be peppered with more questions regarding the incident.
Category: Auto Racing
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com