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Tag:Steve Wallace
Posted on: August 23, 2011 5:48 pm
 

Hair pulling crew chief fined $5,000

Posted by Pete Pistone

NASCAR has fined crew chief Jerry Baxter $5,000 for his hair pulling incident with Steve Wallace after last Saturday's NASCAR Nationwide Series race in Montreal.

Baxter grabbed Wallace after the race upset about an on track-nicdent involving his driver Patrick Carpentier.

Baxter has been placed on NASCAR probation until Dec. 31 for violating Section 12-1 (actions detrimental to stock car racing – involved in an altercation on pit road after the completion of the race).

 
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Posted on: August 22, 2011 2:16 pm
Edited on: August 22, 2011 2:25 pm
 

Waltrip team apologizes for hair pulling incident

Posted by Pete Pistone




The damage control went into play on Monday when Pastrana Waltrip Racing issued a formal apology for Saturday's incident during the Montreal Nationwide Series race when crew chief Jerry Baxter reached in and pulled Steve Wallace's hair while the driver was sitting in his car.

The altercation took place in the aftermath of Wallace and driver Patrick Carpentier making contact on track during the event on the twisting Montreal road course.

Monday's statements came from Baxter and team co-owner Michael Waltrip:

JERRY BAXTER – “I’m sorry for what happened after the race on Saturday and I take responsibility for my own actions. I called Steve (Wallace) today and apologized. I was just very frustrated and let my emotions get to me. That was Patrick’s (Carpentier) last race and we wanted to make it special. We really thought he had a shot for the win and everything boiled over when that chance went away in the wreck. Everyone was just racing hard and there was no intent to wreck anyone. There’s no excuse for what I did after the race and I apologize to everyone.”

MICHAEL WALTRIP – “Pastrana Waltrip Racing prides itself on racing hard, but we always want to be good sports. Jerry Baxter is very passionate about our race team, but what Jerry did after Saturday’s race was wrong and he knows it. I talked to him about it that night and again today. Believe me, I understand how emotional you can get behind the wheel or up on the pit box, I’ve been there. But, you have to draw a line and Jerry crossed that line. It’s not what we are all about. I apologize to Steve Wallace and all his fans as well as all NASCAR fans.”
 

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Posted on: January 19, 2011 12:59 pm
Edited on: January 19, 2011 12:59 pm
 

Steve Wallace to make Cup debut in Daytona 500

From Team Press Release

 

Officials of Rusty Wallace Racing announced that 23 year-old Steve Wallace will make his NASCAR Sprint Cup Series debut in February's 53rd annual running of NASCAR's most prestigious event, the Daytona 500. Wallace will pilot the No. 77 Toyota Camry for RWR at Daytona, with backing from longtime sponsor 5-Hour Energy and new partner Aspen Dental.

When Steve Wallace and the 5-Hour Energy Camry take the green flag on February 20th at NASCAR's most historic venue, the well-pedigreed racer will write his own chapter in NASCAR history. His Sprint Cup debut will make the Wallace family the first ever to have produced four Daytona 500 competitors, breaking a longtime tie with the Petty, Allison, Earnhardt and Bodine families. When Wallace starts the 2011 event, a member of his family will have competed in 27 of the last 30 Daytona 500s.

The third-generation driver will have familiar leadership for his first run in The Great American Race, as RWR General Manager, Larry Carter, will serve as crew chief for the No. 77 5-Hour Energy Toyota. A veteran Sprint Cup crew chief, Carter led Rusty Wallace to a top-10 in the elder Wallace's final Daytona 500 in 2005, as well as a fourth-place finish in the July 2005 event at Daytona.

Providing additional comfort to the younger Wallace in his Cup Series debut is a guaranteed place among the 43-car starting field, enabled through an agreement between RWR and Penske Racing.

Said Steve Wallace, "Starting my first Daytona 500 is definitely going to be the most exciting day of my career-make that my life-so far.  It's something that every kid wanting to be a racer-including me-dreams of doing one day. It's the some of the best drivers in the world competing in the biggest race in the world.  I really have to thank 5-Hour Energy and Aspen Dental for making this possible.

"As far as the race, my goals are simple: to stay out of trouble, earn all the respect I can from the other guys and make sure the 5-Hour Energy Toyota is there at the end of the race. The way restrictor plate racing goes, if we can do that, there's no telling what can happen."

If his Nationwide Series record is any proof, Wallace has shown his ability to survive-and thrive-on Daytona's high banks. Wallace has four lead-lap top-15 finishes in his last five Daytona starts, including a top-ten in last February's 300-miler. In the other event, Wallace ran among the contenders until being taken out by a bizarre incident for which Jason Leffler was penalized five laps.

Team owner Rusty Wallace shares his son's enthusiasm for the event. "This is a big event for all of us-for Steve, our team, our family and our sponsors," Wallace stated, "When you're a young driver coming up, you dream about racing in the Daytona 500 and now Steve's going to get the opportunity to do it. He's grown by leaps and bounds as a driver in the Nationwide Series over the last few years and we think he's ready for this opportunity.

"We've been looking at this race as an opportunity for a while, because I really believe that the new pavement at Daytona is going to be a great equalizer among the teams. The cars will have a ton of grip and it's going to make handling a much smaller part of the equation.

"Our program for Daytona has come together pretty quickly and I really want to thank 5-Hour Energy and Aspen Dental for coming aboard to support it."


 

Category: Auto Racing
 
 
 
 
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