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Tag:Red Sox
Posted on: November 30, 2011 1:18 pm
 

Hellickson, Kimbrel lead All-Rookie team

Craig KimbrelBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Just when you thought award season was over -- move over Justin Verlander, you're not going to be on this list -- the Topps Major League Rookie All-Star Team was announced on Wednesday. This is actually the 53rd, or so they tell us, All-Rookie team the baseball card company has put out (and did include Verlander back in 2006).

So, here it is:

1B Mark Trumbo, Angels

2B Danny Espinosa, Nationals

SS Dee Gordon, Dodgers

3B Brett Lawrie, Blue Jays

OF Desmond Jennings, Rays

OF Josh Reddick, Red Sox

OF Ben Revere, Twins

C J.P. Arencibia, Blue Jays

SP Jeremy Hellickson, Rays

RP Craig Kimbrel, Braves

In all, it looks fine. I'm a bigger fan of Eric Hosmer than Trumbo, but I can see why some would pick Trumbo. I'd also take Dustin Ackley over Espinosa, but otherwise, it seems difficult to nitpick all that much. And in the end, if you're nitpicking the Topps Major League Rookie All-Star Team, you may need to get out of the house a little more.

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Posted on: November 29, 2011 8:21 pm
Edited on: November 29, 2011 8:57 pm
 

Vintage video: Valentine's dugout disguise

By Matt Snyder

One of the most talked about moments of new Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine's career was when he was ejected from a game and came back into the dugout wearing sunglasses and a fake mustache as a disguise -- while also standing back in a bit of a dark corner. He was eventually fined and suspended for the act.

Here it is, courtesy of MLB.com video.



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Posted on: November 29, 2011 6:44 pm
Edited on: November 30, 2011 6:41 pm
 

Red Sox to name Bobby Valentine manager

By Matt Snyder

Bobby Valentine will be named the next manager of the Boston Red Sox at a 5:30 p.m. news conference on Thursday, capping off one of the weirdest managerial searches in recent memory.

First, the Red Sox were going to hire someone from their first wave of interviews. Then the Cubs hired Dale Sveum and all of a sudden the Red Sox went back and started over, expanding their search. Then we heard reports that a manager would be named Tuesday, only to find out that would be delayed until later in the week. Tuesday, the saga took another turn.

Karl Ravech of ESPN -- the studio host of Baseball Tonight, not a reporter, mind you -- tweeted that Gene Lamont had been eliminated from contention for the manager job. That would leave only Valentine as a candidate, so the logical conclusion was that he would be hired. Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe then reported that Valentine is the choice over Lamont "but that could change."

Lamont hadn't been notified of anything, according to Danny Knobler of CBSSports.com. And Alex Speier of WEEI.com had a team source that says reports indicating Lamont is out were "not true." And Cafardo noted there hadn't been any contract negotiations between Valentine and the Red Sox.

Then came the report from ESPNBoston.com's Gordon Edes that Valentine will be hired (later confirmed by Sports Illustrated's Jon Heyman and the Boston Globe's Peter Abraham, before the AP's report).

Valentine to Red Sox
The AP report says the two sides are working on finishing the deal, but Valentine is currently in Japan, though other reports note he's due back on Wednesday.

Valentine, 61, managed the Rangers for parts of eight seasons and then the Mets for parts of seven seasons. He won two NL wild cards and one NL pennant with the Mets and has 1,117 wins against 1,072 losses in his managerial career. Valentine also served as a manager in Japan for several years and is currently a baseball analyst for ESPN -- a position he'll obviously leave to take the Red Sox job.

Valentine has a huge contingent of fans who seem to hate him while others love him. He once wore a "disguise" (a fake mustache) in the dugout after being ejected from a game and has always been rather boisterous. Now he'll be the head of one of the most polarizing teams in baseball that is coming off an epic collapse followed by a nightmare of an early offseason.

Basically, if nothing else, this is going to be entertaining.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: November 28, 2011 8:19 pm
Edited on: November 29, 2011 11:08 am
 

Report: Red Sox to name manager Tuesday

By Matt Snyder

Boston managerial search
UPDATE: Scott Miller has now reported that the decision will drag on until later in the week.



The Boston Red Sox are expected to name their new manager Tuesday. Bobby Valentine and Gene Lamont are the finalists, and Valentine is flying back from Japan Tuesday. The belief is that when he gets back, the Red Sox will inform both managerial candidates of their decision, reports Joel Sherman of the New York Post.

On the other hand, Sean McAdam of CSN New England is reporting that Tuesday being decision day is "inaccurate." I guess we'll find out soon enough which person is right. Regardless, pretty much everyone has reported the search has been narrowed to Lamont and Valentine.

Lamont, 64, is currently the Tigers' third base coach, but has two managerial stints under his belt. He managed the White Sox from 1992-1995, winning the AL manager of the year in 1993 as the White Sox won the AL West. Lamont's Sox were in first again in 1994, but the season was ended without a postseason due to labor strife. He then managed the Pirates from 1997-2000, never winning more than 79 games in a season.

Valentine, 61, managed the Rangers for parts of eight seasons and then the Mets for parts of seven seasons. He won two NL wild cards and one NL pennant with the Mets and has 1,117 wins against 1,072 losses in his managerial career. Valentine also served as a manager in Japan for several years and is currently a baseball analyst for ESPN.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 28, 2011 7:15 pm
Edited on: November 29, 2011 11:06 am
 

Trade rumor du jour: Matt Garza available



By Matt Snyder


Earlier Monday, Buster Olney of ESPN tweeted that the Cubs were willing to trade starting pitcher Matt Garza and there's been much discussion all day about where he might be headed, if he's traded. This isn't really news, though, because it's widely known the Cubs will listen to trade offers on just about everyone (21-year-old shortstop Starlin Castro probably isn't headed anywhere, but everyone else could surely be had at a reasonable price).

Still, we might as well just take the opportunity to talk about where Garza would fit. It's that time of the year, after all, with the Winter Meetings starting in just one week.

Rumor Mill
We know the Yankees and Red Sox want starting pitching. They always do. The Blue Jays, Rockies and Reds are also looking and a trade would fit better than spending big on a free agent. The Marlins and Nationals have been heavily involved in courting free agent starting pitchers, and in doing so they wouldn't have to cough up a good package of prospects, but don't count them out, either. And the list could be even bigger, this was just picking out a few obvious teams.

Expect the new Cubs administration -- led by Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer -- to actively seek out ways to restock the farm system as they look to build a strong foundation. That means if you see a name in trade rumors, it's probably true the Cubs are listening to offers. To reiterate, they're listening on virtually everyone. They're looking for any opportunity to start planning for the future, even if it's at the expense of the present.

Garza, 28, was 10-10 with a 3.32 ERA, 1.26 WHIP and 197 strikeouts in 198 innings last season, his first in Chicago. Sabermetric stats such as FIP, xFIP and WAR loved Garza last season, too, so front offices with analytical leanings will certainly be contacting Epstein, Hoyer and company.

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Posted on: November 26, 2011 10:40 pm
 

Wily Mo Pena may be headed to Japan

Wily Mo Pena

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Wily Mo Pena, who played in 39 games between the Diamondbacks and Mariners in 2011, is close to signing with the Softbank Hawks in Japan, Sponichi in Japan is reporting (via YakyuBaka.com).

Pena hit 26 home runs as a 22-year-old for the Reds in 2004, but since then has been overwhelmed by Major League pitching in stints with the Red Sox, Nationals, Diamondbacks and Mariners. Pena was in independent baseball as recently as 2010 before signing the Padres in 2010 and then with the Diamondbacks.

Pena's signing would be a footnote if it weren't for his great name and his prodigious power -- but Pena, when he makes contact, can put the ball in seats, and beyond.

While Pena managed to hit just .204/.250/.416 with seven home runs in 120 plate appearances in the big leagues in 2011, he dominated in the minors, hitting .358/.440/.712 with 25 home runs in 332 plate appearances with Triple-A Reno and Tacoma. Japan is probably the best option for his career, and certainly for his wallet. The report says he could get a two-year deal worth 400 million Yen (currently about $5.15 million), plus incentives and will be announced in the next couple of days. Will he succeed? There are plenty of former big leaguers who do succeed in Japan, but there are just as many (if not more) who fail. At the very least, Hawks batting practices could be a lot more fun to watch next season.

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Posted on: November 25, 2011 2:25 pm
Edited on: November 25, 2011 2:39 pm
 

Boston to choose between Valentine and Lamont?



By C. Trent Rosecrans


The Red Sox may be down to Bobby Valentine and Gene Lamont as their next manager with an announcement coming next week, according to multiple reports out of Boston.

Both Valentine and Lamont have met with the Red Sox ownership group, while Toronto first base coach Torey Lovullo has not. Alex Speier of WEEI.com reports the team will do no more interviews, so it appears the team is down to the two.

Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe cites sources as saying Valentine is "really excited" about the possibility of managing the Red Sox -- and certainly the Boston media is really excited about covering the outspoken Valentine, probably more than Lamont, who is perceived to be more milquetoast than Valentine.

Lamont, easily the underdog, does have eight years of managing under his belt. The 64-year-old managed the White Sox from 1992-95, winning a division title and the Manager of the Year award in 1993. Lamont's White Sox were in first place in 1994 when MLB went on strike. He also managed the Pirates from 1997-2000, leading the Pirates to their best record (79-83 in 1997) during the franchise's current streak of 19 consecutive losing seasons. He's been on Jim Leyland's staff in Detroit since 2006.

Valentine is currently an announcer on ESPN and last managed in the big leagues in 2002. In 15 seasons with the Rangers and Mets, valentine has a 1,117-1,072 record, leading the Mets to the World Series in 2000. He also done two stints as a manager in Japan, winning the 2005 Japan Series with the Chiba Lotte Marines.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 25, 2011 1:28 pm
 

Jays asked for Buchholz in exchange for Farrell



By C. Trent Rosecrans

How much is a manager worth?

If you're the Marlins, it's worth two minor-leaguers in exchange for Ozzie Guillen, a manager with a .524 winning percentage over eight years and a World Series title.

If you're the Blue Jays, you seem to think your manager with one year of experience and a .500 record is worth a 27-year old starter with an All-Star appearance under his belt. The Boston Red Sox, apparently, don't agree.

According to several reports, including one from the New York Times, the Red Sox passed when the Blue Jays asked for Clay Buchholz in return for John Farrell. And wisely so.

While some may get up in arms about this trade possibility (or, really, non-possibility when you think about it), it makes sense from both sides. It's part of doing business -- the Red Sox needed a new manager after getting rid of Terry Francona, and in Farrell, there was a known commodity inside the organization (Farrell had been the Red Sox pitching coach) with major-league managing experience. He was a perfect fit. Except, you know, for that part about him already having a job and being under contract for the next two years.

That's where the Blue Jays had leverage -- if the Red Sox wanted Farrell, they could have him for a price. Asking for Buchholz is probably as close to saying "no" as you can without saying that word -- the Blue Jays didn't want to give up their manager that they like just fine, so the price was high. If they had to get a new manager, that manager would love to have Buchholz in the rotation, that's for sure. 

While the Blue Jays seem to think their manager is worth quite a bit, the market tells us differently. So far this offseason, there's been a run this off-season on first-year managers. The Cubs, White Sox and Cardinals -- three marquee openings -- went to first-time managers, the White Sox hiring a guy who has never managed at any level. The market, it seems is saying experienced managers are not worth the money they command. If you have a Tony La Russa, it's fine to pay him a lot. But if you don't, go out and storm the Wal-Mart for your next manager and get him at a discount.

Trades for a manager are rare -- as the Guillen trade was the first since the Rays sent Randy Winn and a minor-leaguer to Seattle for Lou Piniella in 2002. That one didn't pay immediate dividends, but there are at least two trades for managers that did seem to be worth the price. The Mets sent right-hander Bill Denehy to the Senators for manager Gil Hodges after the 1967 season and the Mets went on to win the 1969 World Series. The Pirates got their own World Series-winning manager in a trade, sending veteran catcher Manny Sanguillen to the A's for Chuck Tanner following the 1976 season. Tanner led the Pirates to the 1979 World Series title (with Sanguillen, who was traded back to the Pirates after the 1977 season).

It's hardly out of the question for Guillen -- or Farrell -- to lead their team to the World Series, but it's more likely Buchholz will contribute more value than any manager, so the Blue Jays were right to ask for Buchholz and the Red Sox were right to say no.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com