Tag:Zack Greinke
Posted on: July 5, 2010 8:48 pm
Edited on: July 5, 2010 8:50 pm
 

Mariners scartch Bedard


Erik Bedard Erik Bedard's return to the mound is coming, but it's not going to be Tuesday as previously planned.

The Mariners scratched Bedard prior to Monday's game against the Royals.

"He says he's still feeling a little bit of discomfort in his shoulder," Mariners manager told the Seattle Times' Geoff Baker . "It kind of creeped up on him in his last bullpen. We're going to have him re-evaluated by the doctor today and a we should know a little more later on this afternoon."

Ryan Rowland-Smith will face Kansas City's Zack Greinke instead.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.





Posted on: July 3, 2010 9:59 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:16 pm
 

Scioscia against All-Stars for every team


Jose Rosado Because I grew up a Royals fan everywhere but Missouri, I've always been a fan of the rule requiring each team to have at least one representative for the All-Star Game.

Whether I lived in Cuba, Virginia, Texas, Japan or Georgia -- I was always guaranteed to see someone in a Royals uniform (usually George Brett) on TV every year. Not that the Royals of my youth needed the courtesy All-Star, they'd usually earned more than one berth in the game, but still, I knew there'd always be at least one. Sometimes that was the only time all year I'd be able to see a Royal on TV.

Now, though, I could -- if I wanted to punish myself -- watch just about every pitch of the Royals' awful season. With my MLB.tv subscription, my PS3, iPad and iPhone, I can watch those beautiful powder blue tops no matter where I go. That technology -- not to mention the advent of MLB Network, cable and satellite -- may have made the reason for the rule to have every team represented obsolete.

Angels manager Mike Scioscia said he thinks the rule should no longer apply.

"I'm all in favor of having guidelines where you try and represent every team," Scioscia told reporters, including the Orange County Register . "To have a hard-line rule, I think there are exceptions where a team doesn't have anyone All-Star worthy."

Scioscia was the manager of the All-Star team in 2003, when Lance Carter of the Ryas made the team with a 4.05 ERA and six blown saves.

"It's really a misnomer to say the manager picks the All-Star team. It doesn't happen," Scioscia said. "That team, with the guidelines in place, is virtually picked before it ever gets to the [manager]."

The rule helps explain why Jose Rosado's obituary will list him as a two-time All-Star and Mark Redman has an appearance on his resume.

There are currently 13 teams with losing records, some have obvious choices (like, say, the Cubs' Marlon Byrd or the Indians' Shin-Soo Choo), while it's a little tougher to choose a worthy All-Star from a team like the 24-55 Orioles (Ty Wigginton, Luke Scott?) or the 32-49 Astros (Dan Haren and his 4.56 ERA?)

Not all bad teams are created equally. The 33-46 Mariners have three worthy All-Stars in Ichiro Suzuki (who will no doubt be voted into the starting lineup by fans), Cliff Lee (if he's still a Mariner in a week) and Felix Hernandez. Even the Royals, at 35-45, wouldn't be embarrassed by David DeJesus, Joakim Soria or even Zack Greinke, who is having a down year.

If the game is truly for the fans, why not let it represent all the fans, and not just the Yankees and Red Sox? Baseball's All-Star Game is a celebration of the game with its best players and some of its nearly-best player or best players on one team. In the end, after injuries and the new rule against pitchers who pitch on Sunday throwing again in the All-Star Game on Tuesday, is it really that terrible to have the 75th best player in the game "snubbed" for the 131st?

In the end, I think of the 11-year old me waiting for Kevin Seitzer to get in the game, even if that visual is as anachronistic as my father listening to the Kansas City A's on the radio. Maybe out there somewhere, there's a kid excited about watch Andrew McCutchen get in the game, even if it's not "fair".

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Posted on: June 13, 2010 4:54 pm
Edited on: June 13, 2010 5:06 pm
 

Adjustment pays off for Greinke



CINCINNATI -- At least one scout was in Cincinnati Sunday to see just what was wrong with the Royals' Zack Greinke. Whatever it was, that scout didn't see it, nor did the Reds.

The Royals scored their first run for Greinke in 22 innings in the first and added six more for a 7-3 victory. Greinke allowed five hits and struck out 12 in the complete-game performance.

The difference between Greinke's four-game slide (0-4, 7.97 ERA in his last four outings) and Sunday's victory over the National League's top offensive club may have been as small as a tenth of a second, manager Ned Yost noted.

Following last Tuesday's six-run outing in Minnesota, Greinke spent Wednesday in the Target Field video room with Royals pitching coach Bob McClure studying video.

"What they found was he was a tenth of a second to a tenth-and-a-half of a second, whatever that computes to be, quicker in the windup," Yost said. "What that does, it doesn't give him enough time to get back and fully loaded and in turn, his arm starts to drag. They increased his load, got his hands in a better position and the results were obvious today."

In his last outing, Greinke noticed two Twins, Michael Cuddyer and Jason Kubel, took good swings on his curveball -- "and it doesn't seem like they ever take good swings on curveballs" -- so he went back to look at the video of what he was doing on those pitches. Greinke and McClure watched where his hands were for those pitches and his glove hand was down low sometimes and up high sometimes, no matter the pitch.

"We noticed my glove was moving differently on certain pitches," Greinke said. "It would be random, but the guys were seeing how the glove was different. [McClure] looked at last year; I was always up last year and this year I've been down and up."

Sunday, he kept his glove up and sent the Reds down. Greinke allowed two runs in the first -- including a solo homer to Joey Votto, but then retired the next 11 batters he faced and didn't allow another run until Votto's solo homer in the ninth.

The first homer, Greinke noted, wasn't as much a physical mistake as a mental one: "I didn't want to throw Votto changeups going in, I threw him one and he hit it well, it was being stupid," Greinke said. Even then, the homer was one that would likely be an out in most parks around the majors.

Greinke's 12 strikeouts were a season-high and he struck out National League RBI leader Jonny Gomes three times.

It also helped that the Royals scored, touching Reds rookie Sam LeCure for four runs in 6.2 innings and adding three more to the Reds' brutal bullpen. The Royals hadn't scored a single run with Greinke on the mound since May 18.

"He pitched great today, he had a lot more break on his slider today and he was locating the ball today," said Billy Butler, who had four hits and four RBI, including his sixth home run of the season. "He had that confidence that he had last year today and hopefully he can build on that and hopefully we keep putting up seven runs for him."

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Posted on: June 9, 2010 6:39 pm
Edited on: June 9, 2010 6:50 pm
 

Suspended Volquez to start rehab assignment

Reds starter Edinson Volquez, currently serving a 50-game suspension, will start Saturday for the Lychburg Hillcats as part of a rehabilitation assignment, according to MLB.com's Mark Sheldon .

The suspension, for testing positive for a performance-enhancing substance in violation of Major League Baseball’s Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program, will not impact his ability to play in minor league games. Volquez, an All-Star in 2008, underwent Tommy John surgery on his right elbow on Aug. 3, 2009. Volquez has not thrown in a game since last June.

Although he's suspended for testing positive for PEDs, Volquez was allowed to continue his rehab at the Reds' facilities in Goodyear, Ariz., and will be eligible to return from his suspension next week, although his rehab will likely take longer than that.

Volquez could be used as a reliever upon his return to help the Reds' ailing bullpen or he could return later and take some of the pressure off of rookie starter Mike Leake, who has already thrown 73 innings this season, more than half of the 142 innings he threw at Arizona State last season. Leake bypassed the minor leagues and the Reds are closely monitoring his pitch counts and the number of innings he's thrown.

Another Reds starter, Homer Bailey, started for Triple-A Louisville on Tuesday night and could return for his spot in the rotation on Sunday aganst the Royals. Reds manager Dusty Baker told reporters before the game that no decision has been made on Sunday's starter. If Bailey isn't ready, Sam LeCure will start against Kansas City's Zack Grienke.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
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