Tag:Mariners
Posted on: July 26, 2011 9:29 am
Edited on: July 26, 2011 9:42 am
 

Pepper: Bedard's start in nick of time



By Matt Snyder


Good news is hard to come by when a team has lost 16 games in a row, but the Mariners at least received marginally good news Monday. Left-handed starting pitcher Erik Bedard will return to the mound Friday (MLB.com).

On the surface, it's kind of a "who cares?" type movement. The Mariners are 15 1/2 games out and obviously will not factor into the AL West race. It's just that there's something else rapidly approaching, and that is the non-waiver trade deadline. Bedard is 32, on a one-year contract and has been effective when healthy this season (3.00 ERA, 1.11 WHIP, 85 strikeouts, 26 walks in 90 innings).

With the deadline Sunday at 4:00 p.m. ET, Bedard's start coming Friday, several contending teams looking for starting pitching, a lack of quality starting pitchers readily available and the Mariners obviously in selling mode, Bedard coming off the disabled list couldn't come at a much better time for all parties involved. As long as he gets through the start healthy, expect to hear his name in rumors this coming weekend.

HOW TRADES HAPPEN: Former Reds and Nationals general manager Jim Bowden now writes for ESPN, and he has an article up about how trades happen. It's nothing really Earth-shattering, in fact it might seem a bit obvious, but it's still a detailed look about the methodology of going through a major-league trade from someone who has made several in his time.

BUCHHOLZ PROGRESSING: The Red Sox have the best record in the American League, and they've been doing it of late with a patchwork pitching rotation. Jon Lester returned Monday night and now Clay Buchholz is making solid progress in his fight to return from a back injury. Monday, he estimated that he's "75 to 80 percent" healthy after throwing a bullpen session, including breaking pitches (Boston.com).

LACK OF SECURITY: Last week, a fan ran onto Citi Field during a Mets-Cardinals game. Usually when these clowns run on the field, they're stymied by security pretty quickly. Not this time, as the fan took security for quite a ride. Jon Bois over at SB Nation has the details along with video and a map.

WHITE HOUSE INVASION: The Giants won the World Series last year with a group of colorful personalities. That group was back together Monday as the champs visited President Obama in the White House. The Giants went through the usual song and dance, glad-handing with the President, giving him some gifts and posing for plenty of pictures. Perhaps the best part of the whole visit was the presentation. You wouldn't expect personalities like Tim Lincecum or Brian Wilson to dial anything down for the visit -- like a haircut or shave, perhaps -- and they didn't disappoint. Check out the photo at right here, courtesy of the Associated Press.

SEVEN DOWN, TWO TO GO: Michael Cuddyer went into Monday night's game having played six positions for the Twins: First base, second base, third base, left field, right field and center field. After manager Ron Gardenhire saw his pitching staff bludgeoned for 25 hits and 20 runs in seven innings against the Rangers, he turned to Cuddyer for the eighth. Cuddyer ended up throwing the only scoreless frame of the game for the Twins. Sure, he gave up two hits and a walk, but he got through it without allowing a run (3 Up, 3 Down). No other pitcher for the Twins Monday could say the same -- Phil Dumatrait had a line with zero earned runs, but did allow two inherited runners to score. So now the only two positions Cuddyer has never played in a game for the Twins are shortstop and catcher. He has appeared as a DH before, so if you want to count that, he's eight for 10.

A-ROD ON TARGET: Yankees injured third baseman Alex Rodriguez had surgery to repair a torn meniscus in his right knee on July 11 and was given a four to six weeks timetable for his return. As things presently stand, everything is in order and the Yankees expect him back by mid-August (MLB.com).

WALLACE'S TIME LIMITED: Brett Wallace got off to a hot start for the Astros this season. It wasn't just a few games. Through April 30, Wallace was hitting .388 with a .988 OPS. Since then, however, both figures have pretty progressively come down to the current marks of .279 and .749, respectively. Manager Brad Mills has reportedly tried to balance protecting Wallace against left-handers versus trying to develop the young first baseman. Mills is now leaning toward sitting Wallace more often against left-handers (Ultimate Astros).

BALL-HAWKIN': Highly-touted Angels rookie Mike Trout hit his first major-league home run Sunday, and it was caught by famous ball hawk Zack Hample -- who has caught over 5,000 balls at major-league games and written three books on the subject. The OC Register has the story about how Hample planned to catch Trout's first homer, how he made it happen and how he gave the ball back to Trout.

MORE DAY BASEBALL: When the Marlins move into their new home next season -- hopefully to a lot more fanfare than they get in their current football stadium -- they'll be playing a lot more day games (MLB.com).

BROOKS WAS HERE: The Orioles have begun building a statue to honor Hall of Fame third baseman Brooks Robinson at Camden Yards. The statue will be nine feet tall and weight 1,500 pounds. It's scheduled to be unveiled Oct. 21 of this year. Fittingly, the statue will depict the 16-time Gold Glover preparing to make a routine throw to first base (Baltimore Sun).

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Posted on: July 26, 2011 1:41 am
 

Astros latest team to fall victim to U2

U2By C. Trent Rosecrans

Count the Houston Astros among the growing number of teams none too thrilled with U2.

Following Monday's loss to the Cardinals, several Astros complained about the new grass surface at Busch Stadium. U2 held a concert at Busch Stadium on July 17 and the team stripped the outfield of grass and re-sodded it afterwards. With the high temperatures, it was difficult for the grass to take root in time for Monday's game, the first post-Bono game held at Busch Stadium, Derrek Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch wrote.

The Edge and company helped the home team in the second inning, when Astros right fielder Hunter Pence slipped on the new sod, allowing St. Louis' Nick Punto to cruise to a triple and drive in a run. St. Louis added another with a one-out fielder's choice by starter Kyle McClellan.

"We knew there was a new sod and ground balls were going to be tougher," Pence told Zachary Levine of the Houston Chronicle. "We really didn't expect all the slipping to go down."

Center fielder Michael Bourn said he had trouble all game.

"If you try to plant good, you'll end up falling," Bourn told Levine.

He added, "You could tell it's very new out there. The cracks are still in the ground, which means the grass had just been planted. We just had to try to get used to it. It's real hard to keep your ground out there. It's real hard to keep your feet underneath you."

Manager Brad Mills said the team was "not thrilled" with the state of the field.

"You want the sure footing and so forth, but it wasn't there and it cost us a little bit," Mills said.

U2 has already given the Mariners an unfair advantage in its series with the Marlins, with three of Florida's "home games" being played at Safeco Field in Seattle. The Mariners won two of the three games.

A U2 concert at Angel Stadium in Anaheim forced the Angels to go on a 12-game road trip that covered more than 8,000 miles. The Angels went 8-4 on the trip and showed no ill-effects on their next homstand, winning 11 of 13 upon their return.

Oakland didn't have quite as long of a road trip as their AL West brethren, going on just a 10-game trip because of U2's concert in Oakland. However, they didn't handle it as well as the Angels, going 1-9 on the 10-game trip to facilitate the band, that like the A's peaked in the late 80s and early 90s.

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Posted on: July 26, 2011 1:02 am
Edited on: July 26, 2011 8:21 am
 

Monday's trade rumor roundup

By C. Trent Rosecrans

As the non-waiver trade deadline looms on Sunday, the rumors are coming fast and furious -- with some make sense and others not so much. Much of what you hear at this time of year is a smokescreen, but baseball fans love gossip more than junior high school girls, with less regard to the truth. So, to help satisfy that desire, we're rounding up the day's rumors in one place.

• The Rays won't deal James Shields, our own CBSSports.com senior writer Danny Knobler reports. Tampa Bay has told other teams that they won't discuss Shields, David Price or Jeremy Hellickson. That said, Jeff Niemann and Wade Davis are available, as is B.J. Upton.

MLB Trade Deadline

• The Rays are also offering closer Kyle Farnsworth to anyone interested, Buster Olney of ESPN.com tweets.

• CBSSports.com's Scott Miller says he's also heard that the Phillies have "way cooled" on acquiring Carlos Beltran, backing up Knobler's report from Sunday.

• Jerry Crasnick of ESPN.com tweets the Rangers and Giants are ahead of the Phillies and Braves as of Monday.

• The chance of the Rockies dealing Ubaldo Jimenez is "around 50/50" FoxSports.com's Jon Paul Morosi writes, citing a "major-league source close to the talks." He adds the Reds are still involved and the Tigers are interested as well. Morosi reports one team has exchanged names with the Rockies.

• The Reds are drawing interest on right-hander Edinson Volquez, Ken Rosenthal of FoxSports.com tweets.

• The Cardinals and Nationals have talked about sending Todd Coffey -- a former Red and Brewer -- to St. Louis. The team would like to keep Tyler Clippard, but if someone wows them, they're open, Morosi tweets.

• The Yankees won't move top prospects -- such as left-hander Manny Banuelos, right-hander Dellin Betances or catchers Jesus Montero or Austin Romine -- unless they get an ace-type pitcher in return, Joel Sherman of the New York Post tweets.

• The Phillies are "aggressive" on Heath Bell and Mike Adams of the Padres, but are surprised they aren't getting more interest fron the Yankees, Cardinals and Reds, Sherman tweets.

• Astros left-hander Wandy Rodriguez is available, but with $40 million left on his contract, another general manager tells Sports Illustrated's Jon Heyman, "nobody's going to touch Wandy."

• Hiroki Kuroda would consider waiving his no-trade clause if he's sent to the Yankees or Red Sox, "a baseball official"  tells ESPNNewYork.com's Andrew Marchand. However, the teams "hottest" on Kuroda are reportedly the Indians, Tigers and Rangers, according to Rosenthal.

• It's not a trade, but a player acquisition -- the Brewers, Giants, Mariners and A's are interested in Wily Mo Pena, who was released by the Diamondbacks on Sunday, Heyman tweets. He makes the most sense in the American League where he doesn't need a glove. [Heyman]

• Aaron Harang had been mentioned in some trade talks, but there are reports that San Diego would like to keep him and re-sign him, according to Jayson Stark of ESPN.com. Harang, a San Diego native, would love to stay there -- and keep pitching in Petco Park.

• The Phillies are interested in Colorado's Jason Giambi, Rosenthal tweets. Troy E. Renck of the Denver Post tweets the Pirates are interested in Giambi as well. He's hitting .263/.360/.632 with 10 homers in 111 plate appearances. Giambi had talked about possibly moving to an American League team to DH, but he could still be a valuable left-handed bat off the bench for a National League team. [FoxSports.com and Denver Post]

• The Braves are still interested in the Astros' Hunter Pence, David O'Brien of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution tweets.

• Angels manager Mike Scioscia told MLB.com's Lyle Spencer the team probably wouldn't make a big move at the trade deadline, instead hoping the team can improve from within -- especially with the addition of Fernando Rodney from the disabled list.

• Texas manager Ron Washington called the bullpen a "priority" at the trading deadline, according to MLB.com's T.R. Sullivan.

• One reliever who won't be available to the Rangers, or anyone, is Seattle closer Brandon League. Chuck Armstrong tells Morosi a trade involving League is not likely.

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Posted on: July 25, 2011 3:02 pm
Edited on: July 25, 2011 3:17 pm
 

On Deck: Mariners' futility takes center stage

OD

By Matt Snyder


With one day game and eight teams off, we don't quite have a full slate of games Monday. Still, 10 games is more than on many Mondays, so we'll take it. Obviously the biggest storyline at this point is the trade deadline -- read all Eye on Baseball trade deadline posts by clicking here -- but the games are, you know, kind of important, too. Follow all the action on CBSSports.com's live scoreboard.

Not-So-Sweet 16: The Mariners are in New York to face the Yankees, but the focus of the game is solely on futility. The Mariners have lost 15 straight games, which is the longest losing streak in the majors since 2005. Via Danny Knobler of CBSSports.com, a loss Monday night would make the Mariners the fifth team in the last 40 years to lose 16 straight in a season. So, yes, this losing streak is in historically bad territory. Jason Vargas (6-8, 3.94) will attempt to hold down the Yankees' mighty offense for the Mariners. Freddy Garcia (8-7, 3.21) gets the ball for the Yankees. Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. ET.

Tribe Reeling: The Indians have been one of the feel-good stories of the 2011 season -- along with the Pirates -- but have now lost four straight games. Losing a fifth straight would equal their longest losing streak of the season. They haven't been this close to .500 since early April and being two games out of first place is the furthest behind the Indians have been since the second day of the season. Simply put: A win would be nice for Cleveland. Taking the mound for the Indians is Fausto Carmona (5-10, 5.63). The opponent is the Angels, who Carmona has shut down quite well over the course of his career, with a 1.79 ERA in 45 1/3 innings. The Angels send Dan Haren (10-6, 3.10) to the mound and he's looking to get himself right. The right-hander has a 9.28 ERA in his last two starts. L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. ET.

Lester Returns: Red Sox ace Jon Lester had to leave a no-hitter after four innings July 5 with a strained shoulder muscle, but he's making his return Monday night. Lester (10-4, 3.31) comes in having thrown 11 straight scoreless innings, but the injury may have robbed him of his own momentum. Still, he doesn't have the toughest of tasks Monday, as he'll face the Royals and Kyle Davis (1-9, 7.32). The way the Red Sox are swinging the bats of late and the way Davies has been pitching all season adds up to a potential blowout. We'll find out soon enough. Lester will reportedly be on a pitch count, as the Red Sox would prefer to cap him at around 80 pitches (Boston.com). Kansas City at Boston, 7:10 p.m. ET.

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Posted on: July 24, 2011 12:57 pm
Edited on: July 24, 2011 1:11 pm
 

Could Hunter Pence be a fit with Mariners?

Pence

By Evan Brunell

Over the last two games, I had the pleasure -- if one could call it that -- of watching the Mariners battle the Red Sox at Fenway Park.

To no one's surprise, Seattle lost the first two games, running its losing streak to 14. It's gotten so desperate out in Seattle that manager Eric Wedge lopped off his enormous handlebar mustache to try to shake things up.

Unfortunately, the loss of Wedge's mustache won't mitigate the brutal offense of the team. In fact, there's only one player in Seattle's regular starting lineup that would have a prayer of cracking Boston's lineup. That's second baseman Dustin Ackley, who bats third for Seattle. The problem is, while he would certainly supplant shortstop Marco Scutaro in Boston's lineup, he can't play short and Dustin Pedroia isn't stepping aside for Ackley.

Seattle was a historically inept offensive club last season, and while its improved this year, it's not by much. Before this losing streak, Seattle was right in the thick of the division race, but it's hard to stay in the hunt when you just can't push runs across. Improving the team's offense is of the highest priority int he offseason, but why wait there?

Hunter Pence of the Astros would be a great fit for Seattle, and the Mariners can bring Pence in immediately to at least try to end the season on a high note.

There are three ways Pence fits with the Mariners. First is his offense, obviously. Second is his position of right field, and lastly is his age and contract.

If the Mariners acquired Pence, he would certainly start batting third or fourth in the order on the strength of his .309/.354/.474 mark. While it's not a career-best line, it is his best offensive performance relative to the league, as his .322/.360/.539 mark back in 2007 was in a healthier offensive climate. The ways that Pence would upgrade Seattle are clear -- it's the same way Pence would upgrade every other team. He's a strong hitter with the ability to steal 20 bases in a season and is also a strong fielder.

Speaking of fielding, Pence plays right field, a position occupied by Ichiro Suzuki. That's not a problem, though, because Pence could easily shift to left field and then become Ichiro's eventual replacement, should Pence remain with the Mariners at the time. Mike Carp is currently the (new) starting left fielder, so isn't exactly blocking anyone as a Quad-A player trying to make good in the bigs.

The negative -- if you can call it that -- on Pence is his contract. He's making $6.9 million on the season and has two more years of arbitration to go. Given Pence will likely crack $10 million in arbitration earnings next season, that means his price is rising, and rising fast. On the other hand, Pence offers two additional years of team control beyond 2011, which would be a must in Seattle's case.

It's not about 2011 anymore; it's about 2012 and beyond for Seattle. The pitching is rounding into shape, and now it's time for the offense to take hold. Prince Fielder has been linked to Seattle in the past, but free agency is never a sure bet. Besides, even with Pence on the team, it wouldn't preclude a run at Fielder, which would suddenly give Seattle something resembling a solid offense. People forget, but Seattle is a big-market team that hasn't played big market for a few years. Back in 2008, its $118 million payroll ranked ninth in all of baseball. In 2011, the Mariners are 16th with an $84 million payroll. Seattle has money to play with, so Pence's salary isn't as important as the fact Seattle would control him through 2013 at the earliest.

Of course, what the M's would have to give up in a trade has to be considered. It's safe to say that Michael Pineda won't go anywhere, but the M's have a deep enough farm system that they could get a deal done if they so desired.

Here's where we mention that there hasn't been anything linking Pence to the Mariners whatsoever. Either that's because there's nothing there or both teams are doing a stupendous job keeping quiet about it. But it's a move Seattle needs to consider to upgrade its offense. Dabbling in free agency won't be enough. Seattle has to strike soon to bolster the offense and give the team a chance to win.

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Posted on: July 22, 2011 5:19 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 6:15 pm
 

On Deck: Big series for Twins

OD

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Chance to gain ground: The Twins are apparently "going for it" -- or at least that's what the latest trade rumors say. We'll see after this weekend, when the Twins host the Tigers, the current leaders in the AL Central. Minnesota has not played particularly well this season and are still six games under .500, but just six games behind Detroit in the mediocre division. With Chicago and Cleveland -- the two teams ahead between Minnesota and Detroit -- playing this weekend, the Twins have a chance to make up some ground in the standings. Lefty Brian Duensing (7-7, 4.14 ERA) gets the call for Minnesota, with Detroit sending out right-hander Max Scherzer (10-6, 4.53 ERA). Tigers at Twins, 8:10 p.m. ET (Follow live)

Felix HernandezJohn LackeyStreak buster? The Mariners have now lost 12 in a row, but they've got perhaps the best possible matchup they could hope for in Boston -- Felix Hernandez against John Lackey. This is bizzaro world, though and Hernandez is coming off a "bad" outing and Lackey a "good" one -- so you just never know. But of course, that's why we watch, isn't it? That said, Hernandez's "bad" outing was nine hits and four runs in 7 2/3 innings with six strikeouts and a walk, while Lackey's "good" outing was 10 hits and four runs (three earned) with seven strikeouts and a walk in 5 2/3 innings -- but that's what we get when we use relative terms like good and bad. Mariners at Red Sox, 7:10 p.m. ET (Follow live)

Look good, play good: I know I'm a little bit weird about these kind of things, but I'm looking forward to tonight's Phillies-Padres game, not because of the matchup of Cole Hamels and Cory Luebke, but because of the uniforms. It's another throwback night, and this one is in my wheelhouse -- 1984. Not only do we get the Padres' so-called Taco Bell hats and brown and yellow pullovers, while the Phillies will wear their pinstripes (although with buttons instead of a zipper, which would make them 1987 uniforms). Anyway, according to UniWatch, this is a good sign for the Padres, because the Phillies are 1-6 at home in throwback uniforms. Padres at Philies, 7:05 p.m. ET (Follow live)

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Posted on: July 21, 2011 11:24 am
Edited on: July 21, 2011 11:38 am
 

On Deck: Runs at a premium in Toronto

OD

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Dodging a dozen: Seattle's lost 11 games in a  row, but has shown signs of life in the first two games of the series in Toronto, scoring at least five runs in back-to-back games for the first time since June 2-3. Starter Doug Fister can only dream of that kind of support -- he is getting the worst run support in the majors at 2.03 per game and just one run in total for his last three starts. Overall he's 3-11 with a 3.18 ERA, a better ERA than Michael Pineda, Felix Hernandez, Jon Lester and David Price. His opponent, Ricky Romero owns the same 3.18 ERA, but hasn't gotten much help either. In the 12 of his starts that the team has lost, they've scored 24 runs. In his last start against the Mariners, he threw a five-hit complete game, but lost 3-2. Mariners at Blue Jays, 12:37 p.m. ET (Follow live)

C.J. WilsonJered WeaverAll-Star showdown: The Rangers' 12-game winning streak is over, and now they've got to face manager Ron Washington's choice to start All-Star Game, Angels right-hander Jered Weaver. In Phoenix, Washington said Weaver was one of the most intense competitors he'd ever faced. Not only is he a competitor, he's a heck of a pitcher. Weaver's 12-4 with a 1.90 ERA, the best mark in the majors. As good as he's been this season, he's been even better lately, going 6-0 with a 1.40 ERA in his last 10 outings. The man Washington is putting on the mound today isn't too bad either -- and he was in Phoenix as well -- as C.J. Wilson is 10-3 with a 3.11 ERA. He's 6-0 with a 2.80 ERA in his last 10 starts. Rangers at Angels, 3:35 p.m. ET (Follow live)

CC SabathiaHappy birthday CC: Yankees left-hander CC Sabathia will celebrate his 31st birthday at Tropicana Field on Thursday night. It marks the third time in his career he's started on his birthday, going 0-1 with a 9.35 ERA in 2002 and 2006. But it would be hard to be pitching better than Sabathia has recently, winning his last seven starts with an ERA of 1.68 over that span. In his last five starts, he's allowed just two runs and struck out 50 in 39 2/3 innings. On the other side is Big Game James Shields, who has a streak of his own -- four starts, all losses. Yankees at Rays, 7:10 p.m. ET (Follow live)

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Posted on: July 20, 2011 10:04 am
Edited on: July 20, 2011 11:05 am
 

Pepper: Harper struggles early in Double-A



By Matt Snyder


Bryce Harper is the top prospect in all of baseball. He has prodigious power and a huge outfield arm. Low-A ball proved no match for him this season, as he hit .318 with 14 home runs, 46 RBI, 19 steals and a .977 OPS in 72 games before being promoted to Double-A. But he's still only 18, and is having a rough transition to Double-A.

Through 10 games, Harper is hitting .171 with a .237 on-base percentage and has yet to record an extra-base hit (Nationals Journal). He also looked overmatched at the Future's Game. So what does this mean?

Not a damn thing.

He's 18. Making the transition from the lower levels of the minors (Rookie ball, Low-A, High-A) to the upper levels (Double-A, Triple-A) is the toughest transition for a player this side of when they hit the majors. He even skipped a level. Plus, 10 games is hardly a representative sample from which to draw conclusions and he started slow in Low-A. It's possible he tears up Double-A pitching starting next game.

If we can say anything definitively, maybe it's that this is good for the fans clamoring for a quick Harper promotion. He's going to be special in a Nationals uniform, just not in 2011 and probably not 2012 either.

NOT SATISFIED: After trading Tuesday night for infielder Jeff Keppinger, Giants general manager Brian Sabean said he was working on "something much bigger" before the move and that he's not done making an effort to improve the badly flawed offense (Extra Baggs).

GMs ON HOT SEAT: Ken Rosenthal at Fox Sports breaks down some general managers who may be out of a job by the time we turn the page to next season. The ones he lists on the hot seat are Ed Wade of the Astros and Jim Hendry of the Cubs. I'd argue pretty vehemently both should be canned immediately, so no shock there. Also of intrigue, Rosenthal says Yankees GM Brian Cashman and Rays GM Andrew Friedman might step away from their current posts. It would be interesting to see how quickly each is snatched up by other teams.

TROUBLE ON THE HOMEFRONT? Before Tuesday night's loss to the Padres, the Marlins had won nine of their last 10 games, but not everyone was happy. Left-handed reliever Randy Choate was pulled from the game Monday after falling behind 2-0 to a hitter. Yes, in the middle of an at-bat. Considering Choate had struck out 23 lefties and walked just before the game, he felt his track record should at least allow him to finish the hitter. McKeon disagreed and yanked him, saying he was "out of sync." The two reportedly talked, but Choate was still upset. (Fish Tank blog)

IRRELEVANT NO-TRADE CLAUSE: Cubs left fielder Alfonso Soriano told reporters he didn't even know he had a no-trade clause. Then he said he'd be willing to waive it if it meant he could play for a contender. Of course, Soriano is owed about $61 million through 2014 and considering his age, how quickly he has regressed and his current level of production, there's pretty much no way anyone is giving much for him. The guess is he's stuck in Chicago -- and, for the record, Soriano did say he was happy in Chicago and wanted to win there. (Chicago Sun-Times)

BEDARD'S RETURN DELAYED: Erik Bedard's return from injury has hit a snag, and he'll be pushed back. He's likely going to need a simulated game before thinking about a rehab assignment. This is big news, because we're approaching the trade deadline and a healthy Bedard was likely to be a pretty solid trading chip for the Mariners. He still might go, but his injury history will be a sticking point for potential suitors. (Seattle Times)

BLYLEVEN ON Twins: Bert Blyleven will be enshrined in Cooperstown this weekend, as a new member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. MLB.com has a lengthy story in which Blyleven reflects on his time with the Twins. One thing that jumped out at me is how Blyleven was drafted out of high school and promoted to the majors after just 21 starts and at the age of 19. If that happened nowadays, how much would we have to hear about the Twins "rushing" him to the bigs? Just something to think about.

IKE'S SEASON STILL IN QUESTION: Earlier Tuesday, a story about Ike Davis saying he feared he was done for the 2011 season broke, but then later Tuesday he changed his tone a bit. There's still a question on if he'll be able to get his ankle healed and make it back on the field, but Davis wasn't ready to rule anything out: "I'm not throwing the towel in," he said (ESPN New York). "I'm going to do everything I can to get healthy. And if I don't, I can't really do anything. My body is just not right. I'm working hard and I want to get back on the field."

ANOTHER RIPKEN: Cal Ripken Jr.'s son, Ryan Ripken, is going to play in the Under Armour All America Baseball Game at Wrigley Field next month. The young Ripken hit .353 as a junior this season and the first baseman is fielding scholarship offers from several colleges. Fortunately, Cal is not pushing his son to baseball, saying he just wants Ryan to do whatever makes him happy (Associated Press).

HOMETOWN DISCOUNT: Padres closer Heath Bell is one of the biggest names being thrown around in trade talk, but he's actually willing to take a "hometown discount" to stay in San Diego. The problem is, he's not likely to have that choice. The Padres are in rebuilding mode, and he's their most attractive trading chip. (Sports Radio Interviews)

TEAM FOR SALE: The Dodgers aren't the only team in financial danger out west, as the Padres' Triple-A affiliate will be put up for sale if plans for a new stadium aren't finalized soon. There were plans for a 9,000-seat stadium in Escondido, but the funding for the stadium is now unavailable in the new state budget. Padres CEO Jeff Moorad said he is still holding out hope that things get worked out before the end of the year. (SignonSanDiego.com)

WANG BACK SOON: Nationals starting pitcher Chien-Ming Wang is scheduled to make one more Triple-A start before joining the majors (Adam Kilgore via Twitter). For more on Wang's return to the majors, check out my short article from this past weekend.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com