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Tag:Adam Dunn
Posted on: July 20, 2010 12:03 pm
Edited on: July 20, 2010 3:01 pm
 

Nationals' Rizzo isn't actively selling

The Washington Nationals are 40-53 and in their usual spot at the bottom of the National League East standings and by all accounts should be selling off pieces at the trade deadline. However, according to CSNwashington.com's Mark Zuckerman , the store is not only not open, the lights are off.

"He's not the one initiating any of the talks," Zimmerman quotes a source "familiar with [Mike] Rizzo's thinking."

The Nationals' biggest trade piece is slugger Adam Dunn, who is a free agent after this season. There have been on-again, off-again reports about a contract extension for Dunn, who is tied for second in the National League in homers (22) and third in OPS (.950). According to Zuckerman, Dunn is searching for a contract longer than three years at more than $15 million a year. The Nationals don't want to give Dunn a contract that long and risk him having 10-5 rights and the ability to kill any trade at the end of his contract.

If the Nationals don't offer Dunn such a contract, he'll test his worth on the free agent market. Dunn has drawn interest from the White Sox and Angels, among other teams.

With a very thin reliever market, the Nationals also have a relatively attractive trade piece in closer Matt Capps. Capps is arbitration-eligible after the season and the team has Drew Storen, their closer of the future, already in the big leagues and pitching well as a setup man.

The team's other trade candidate is outfielder Josh Willingham, who is hitting .277/.404/.490. He's on a one-year contract worth $4.6 million, but like Capps is arbitration eligible and under team control through next season.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.
Posted on: July 20, 2010 10:11 am
Edited on: July 20, 2010 3:03 pm
 

White Sox offering pick of the farm for Dunn

Adam Dunn White Sox general manager Kenny Williams is "desperately" trying to land the Nationals' Adam Dunn, the Chicago Sun-Times ' Joe Cowley writes .

Cowley cites a major-league source as saying Williams has spent the last few days trying to get the Nationals' slugger, offering up "anyone and anything he has in the minor leagues in a package."

However, Cowley writes the Nationals' Mike Rizzo is "still fixated" on getting Gordon Beckham or Carlos Quentin in return.

With Daniel Hudson and Dayan Viciedo on the table, the White Sox are just waiting to hear back from Rizzo.

Still, Williams is playing it close to the vest

"If I'm being honest and completely transparent right now of the price that is being asked for some of the players that we've inquired about, for us, it's more detrimental to our present and our future than we'd like," Williams said.

If anyone is going to overpay for a player like Dunn, it'll be Williams, who is prone to bold gambles. That said, Dunn in U.S. Cellular Field would be a dream for the White Sox.

Dunn, however, is a free agent after the season and made it known he doesn't want to be a full-time designated hitter, while any manager with that option on the table would be fired for negligence if they put him in the field when there's the option to keep his bat in the lineup and glove out of it. If, after the season, a National League team made a play for his services, he'd bolt.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Posted on: July 19, 2010 1:21 pm
Edited on: July 19, 2010 4:16 pm
 

Trade deadline buyer: New York Yankees

As the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline looms, the CBS Facts & Rumors team will look at the biggest players leading up to the deadline. This week we'll look at the teams who will be talked about the most; next week will be the players who might be moved.

Every transaction talk, be it trades or free agents, seems to start with the Yankees and this time is no different.

Brian Cashman Record: 58-33, three games ahead of the Rays and 6 1/2 in front of the Red Sox.
GM: Brian Cashman
Expectations: Anything short of another World Series title is failure, plain and simple.
Payroll status: Not that it matters, the Yankees had an opening day payroll of more than $213 million and already have more than $144 million on the books for 2011.

What they need

Starting pitcher: With Andy Pettitte on the disabled list and A.J. Burnett's recent hissy fit, the Yankees suddenly look to need at least one starter. Until now, the opening day rotation of CC Sabathia, Pettitte, Burnett, Javier Vazquez and Phil Hughes had started all but two of their games. That could be matched this week alone. The team may also be wary of letting Hughes' innings add up through a pennant race and the playoffs. Sergio Mitre is scheduled to start in Pettitte's place, but until now, he's been more successful as a reliever than a starter.

Bullpen help: Starting pitching isn't the only pitching concern the Yankees have as Joba Chamberlain's days as the bridge to Mariano Rivera may be numbered, and it's not as if Chan Ho Park is going to step up and replace him.

Damaso Marte was placed on the disabled list this weekend with Boone Logan called up as the team's only left-handed reliever.

Big bat: Marcus Thames has been better than expected as the Yankees designated hitter, hitting .287/.396/.437 with three homers and 13 RBI in 87 at-bats, but he's hardly a difference-maker. This spot -- especially if Jorge Posada is healthy enough not to need a DH safety net -- could be upgraded, especially if that upgrade could be a spot starter in the outfield.

Bench help: After the regulars, the Yankees feature the likes of Ramiro Pena and Colin Curtis. The team could certainly upgrade its depth in both the infield and the outfield.

Who may fit

Ted Lilly Starting pitcher: Cliff Lee would have been a great fit, but he's gone. Lee was the marquee name available and there's a decided step down after the newest Texas Ranger. Other starters out there are Ted Lilly, Jake Westbrook, Brett Myers, Roy Oswalt, Dan Haren and maybe even someone like Brian Bannister.

Reliever: There are stop-gap attempts like David Aardsma and Leo Nunez, or the Yankees could go for the kill with someone like Royals closer Joakim Soria. Soria is under club control until 2014, so it would take more than just cash, but also top-flight prospects to get the Royals closer and team him with Rivera to make a formidable back of the bullpen.

Other, less expensive, fits could be either of the Blue Jays pair of relievers, Scott Downs or Jason Frasor.

Bat: Again, going for the kill would be Adam Dunn. Dunn in new Yankee Stadium would be a marriage made in heaven. Dunn doesn't want to DH and he doesn't really have any other value, but he would flourish both in the American League and in pinstripes. Still, the Yankees may not want to give up too much for a player they can just buy in the offseason.

If the Yankees can find a top-end starter, they could send Vazquez to Philadelphia for Jayson Werth. David DeJesus would upgrade the outfield, as well.

Bench help:
Wes Helms and Ty Wigginton are corner possibilities and Wigginton can play second, as well. Xavier Nady and Austin Kearns are possible outfield bats that may not be big, but could work for the Yankees.

Trade chips

Jesus Montero Catching prospect Jesus Montero was reportedly only available for Lee, however the almighty dollar is always available. Any team looking to clear cash off the bottom line will talk to the Yankees, who could send middling prospects loaded up with money sacks to any team that's interested. And there are always teams interested in that kind of prospect.

Right-hander Zach McAllister is 7-6 with a 4.82 ERA in 18 starts at Triple-A. He doesn't have dominant stuff, but has good control and projects as a back of the rotation-type pitcher.

Right-hander Ivan Nova, 23, has better stats than McAllister (7-2, 3.21, 78 strikeouts in 103 2/3 innings) and has an impressive fastball. Nova has impressive talent, but has also struggled with consistency as a pro. This season is his best yet, and there's a question as to whether he's reached his ceiling. Still, he's got enough talent to be intriguing to other teams.

Mark Melancon has long been bantered about as the replacement for Rivera when Mo decides to turn his sights to Cooperstown, but Melancon has yet to live up to that hype. He could be one of those players that need a change in scenery to live up to his potential, and there's enough potential for other teams to take a chance on him.

Other possibilities include SS Eduardo Nunez and 2B David Adams, who was one of the other guys mentioned in the Lee trade.

Predictions: The Yankees will add a reliever and a starter -- possibly Lilly and the lefty Downs. Other than that, the team may think it doesn't have to do too much to keep ahead of the Rays and Red Sox.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Posted on: July 16, 2010 5:20 pm
Edited on: July 16, 2010 7:39 pm
 

Yankees would love Dunn, Soria


The Yankees would love to have Adam Dunn and Joakim Soria, FOX Sports' Ken Rosenthal tweets , but adds the caveats that the Nationals asking price for Dunn is "exorbitant" and the "Royals would need to be overwhelmed" to deal their closer.

Dunn is a free agent after the season, but the Nationals must feel they have the inside track at re-signing him. Dunn's value is mostly to American League teams, like the Yankees, who would use him as a designated hitter. Dunn, though, has repeatedly stated his preference to play the field, perhaps limiting his field of teams to National League squads. That would play in favor of the Nationals for him staying. If he signed with an AL club, the temptation would be too great for any manager to be able to get his bat without his glove.

Soria, on the other hand, is valuable and affordable. He signed an extension two years ago that has him under team control through 2014.

Although Soria's name is being thrown around in trade talks, it makes no sense for the Royals to deal him if they think they can compete in the next four seasons.

So, really, my next tweet may be that I'm married, but would love to get calls from two women: Scarlett Johansson and Christina Hendricks. (I do realize it's a flawed comparison, but while I'm no New York Yankees, Dunn and Soria are hardly Johansson and Hendricks.)

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.
Posted on: July 16, 2010 11:41 am
Edited on: July 16, 2010 3:23 pm
 

Angels GM says trade talk is ramping up


Derrek Lee Angels general manager Tony Reagins says trade talks are getting more intense.

"Other clubs are looking at possibilities, at what players might be available from our club, and we're doing the same," Reagins told the Orange County Register 's Dan Woike . "The volume of calls has certainly increased."

The Angels are 47-44 and four-and-a-half games behind the Rangers in the American League West.

Still, Reagins said he wouldn't categorize his team as a buyer or a seller at the deadline.

"I don't think you have to make that decision," Reagins said. "You're looking at your ball club and how a trade affects the current year and the future years. Each deal is different. Each potential acquisition is different.

"… There are player that can help us immediately; you can pursue those. If there are players who can help us immediately and in three years, you pursue those."

The Angels famously need a first baseman and power source with the loss of Kendry Morales. Derrek Lee and Adam Dunn are the most common names popping up for the Angels and that spot. The team could also use another starter.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.
Posted on: July 16, 2010 10:41 am
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:34 am
 

Zimmerman doesn't want Nats broken up


Ryan Zimmerman The Washington Nationals' Ryan Zimmerman knows the team isn't headed to the postseason in 2010, but he's hopeful the team doesn't look too far into the future and keep some of the pieces the team does have right now -- especially Adam Dunn and Josh Willingham.

Zimmerman is under contract through 2013, so it's understandable he'd like the others to stay. However, Dunn and Willingham are free agents after the season, so even not trading them will guarantee they stay in DC.

"We're so close," Zimmerman told the Washington Post 's Adam Kilgore . "I mean, they know. Mike [Rizzo] and Stan [Katsen] are smart. They're one of the biggest reasons we're so much better this year. They drafted well. They traded well. They know what we need to do to win. I don't think either of them want to get rid of either of those guys. They understand what we have, and they're proud of the team we have."

The Nationals are 39-50 and hoping to avoid 100 losses for the third season in a row.

Both Willingham and Dunn have expressed a desire to stay with the Nationals, but Dunn may be wavering because of the Nationals' lack of communication on an extension.

Dunn is also the team's best trading piece, but there's no immediate replacement for Dunn's power production in the system.

The team's other trading piece is closer Matt Capps, signed to a one-year deal. Capps has 23 saves and in a market short on relievers, he could bring in more than his future worth, especially with Drew Storen ready to take over the closer's role and Tyler Clippard with cloer's stuff, as well.

Zimmerman, though, said he'd like to keep the team together and pal the rest of the season at full strength in order to stay below 100 losses and maybe entice free agents to come to Washington.

"I think this year is the first year where we can kind of see over the hump," Zimmerman said. "Next year -- I hate talking about next year already -- but next year we have a possibility to do a lot of damage."

The Nationals are clearly a team on the rise, but Dunn is 30 and may be looking to play for a winning team for once, in his 10 seasons, the only winning team he's played for is the 2008 Diamondbacks, a team that finished 82-80. Dunn joined the team in a trade after the deadline and failed to make the playoffs.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.




Posted on: July 14, 2010 11:31 pm
Edited on: July 15, 2010 11:14 am
 

Nine questions for second half

The first half is in the books, and the NL has home-field advantage in the World Series. Now, all that's left is finding out who changes zip codes at the trade deadline and which teams are left standing in October.

Below are nine questions for the second half to answer ...

Are the Padres for real?

The Padres are currently in first place with a 51-37 record, two games ahead of the Dodgers. However, they're doing so on luck, ranking 22nd in runs scored and with a MLB-leading 3.27 ERA. Their 3.81 xFIP suggest there's plenty of regression to be had, and while that xFIP also tops the league, it's the third biggest disparity in the bigs. And San Diego cannot afford regression in its strength. To stay on top, additional help needs to be brought in. Other questions include the surging White Sox, the sexy-sleeper-who-wasn't-supposed-to-be-this-good Reds and the Mets, who will be bolstered by the addition of Carlos Beltran.

Who will be the biggest name traded at the deadline?

There's always a surprise in store, but the early favorite is Florida's Dan Uggla. The Marlins are sliding out of the pennant race and have a second-baseman making $8 million for the penny-pinchers. Uggla will be a nice commodity as he remains under team control for 2011 is having yet another strong season. The Rockies are closely linked to Uggla, but he could end up on any team -- including suitors who may be eyeing him for third base. Don't rule out Adam Dunn being shipped; the White Sox would love to add him to the fold.

Can the Red Sox and Phillies stay afloat?

Boston and Philadelphia have been rocked by injuries, and while plenty of players have stepped in admirably, one can only get by for so long with replacement parts before feeling the sting. One benefit to players going down with injuries is that both teams will eventually be bolstered by returns, but until then, one of three things will happen: 1) Most players will play over their head, 2) Everyone will begin playing to their true level and 3) Trades to bring in complementary pieces will happen. Going with No. 1 is the most foolhardy thing one could do.

Who will be the next impact player from the minor leagues?

There's been a ton of graduations from Triple-A to the majors lately, and that doesn't figure to change in the second half. Domonic Brown could give the Phillies some offense, while Desmond Jennings could do the same for the Rays. How about Aroldis Chapman coming out of the bullpen breathing fire for the Reds or Jeremy Hellickson strengthening the Rays rotation? Could Brett Wallace help usher in a new era in Toronto alongside new shortstop Yunel Escobar? Or will the promotion of Chris Sale to Triple-A serve as a harbinger for a major-league promotion to help the White Sox stay atop the AL Central?

Are the Orioles this bad?

While the O's were overrated entering the year, no one could have expected a 29-59 record at the All-Star break. Now that they have gotten rid of the chaff (goodbye, Garrett Atkins) and are on the verge of getting Felix Pie back, they should play significantly better to the point where it's questionable if they end up with the No. 1 overall pick in 2011's amateur draft. (Key word: Should.) Cleveland and Pittsburgh have better chances of playing worse than Baltimore. It's hard to imagine the O's remaining pathetic, but in a division where the No. 4 team has a 44-45 record, the going will be tough. Another storyline to follow with the Orioles is who the new manager will be -- all indications point to Buck Showalter.

Will Bryce Harper sign with the Nationals?

The signing deadline for prospects is August 16, and many signings will take place around that time. It's hard to imagine Harper turning down an opportunity to get into pro ball right away -- after all, every move of his to date has been with that goal in mind. For Washington's part, there's been a ton of good feelings surrounding the team lately. By failing to sign another young phenom, the Nats' armor would be dented. The move makes too much sense for both sides. The Pirates should ink Jameson Taillon, but can the Dodgers prove everyone wrong that the selection of Zach Lee wasn't motivated by finances? Lee is considered virtually unsignable, and the Dodgers have money woes. Probably not, but it will be just as intriguing a storyline as Harper's decision.

Can anyone hit 40 home runs?

Currently, Jose Bautista leads the majors in homers with 24. He's on pace to end up with 44, but regression to the mean figures to hit Bautista severely in the second half. Josh Hamilton, Adam Dunn, Miguel Cabrera and Joey Votto all rank second with 22, and all have excellent chances of cracking 40 -- but it's far from certain. And if Albert Pujols can get hot -- he's on pace for just his third season with an OPS under 1.000 out of 10 -- watch out. The best chance of anyone? Dunn, if he goes to the White Sox or another park kind to big boppers.

Can the Year of the Pitcher continue?

There have been two no-hitters and two official perfect games (one unofficial) so far on the year. It's an unheard of mark, and will be fascinating to see if the trend can continue. There are plenty of quality pitchers on the mound and hitters have looked overmatched all year long. Which is why baseball could very well see someone not hit 40 home runs in a season. Keep your eye on this list -- one of those may be celebrating on a mound near you.

Pay attention to Josh Johnson of the Marlins as well, who has a scant 1.70 ERA and would be the first pitcher since Roger Clemens in 2005 (1.87) to have an ERA below 2.00 if he keeps this up.

Who will win the playoff races?

The AL East has quite the three-way battle brewing between the Yankees, Rays and Red Sox. Two are certain to get into the playoffs thanks to the wild card. One will be playing golf in October. While the Red Sox are currently in third place, more advanced standings suggest Boston should be in second place, while the Yankees are just a few key injuries away from their older and productive stars from tumbling off a cliff. The White Sox, Tigers and Twins are locked in their own-three way battle. And don't count the Angels out of the West just yet.

Over in the NL, Atlanta has a nice lead, but the Mets and Phillies refuse to die, the Central has what promises to be an entertaining seesaw battle between the Cardinals and Reds, and the NL West is anyone's game -- well, except for the Diamondbacks. Will a Game 163 be played again this year? With so many tight races, the odds are strong.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Posted on: July 9, 2010 11:30 pm
Edited on: July 10, 2010 5:07 pm
 

What's a guy got to do?

Adam Dunn Here's an amazing fact: Washington's Adam Dunn has now hit 20 or more home runs before the All-Star break in eight consecutive seasons, extending the major-league record he already held.

Here's another amazing fact: In those eight seasons, Dunn has been an All-Star exactly zero times.

Dunn hit three home runs Wednesday night, then tacked on two more Friday to bring his total to 22. So what does a guy have to do to make the All-Star team?

The problem isn't the number of homers, it's the numbers in some of the other categories. In the past seven years, he has averaged a staggering 101 strikeouts before the break, and his career first-half batting average is .253.

Dunn made his only career All-Star appearance in 2002, the year before his 20-homer streak started. He batted .300 in the first half, then .190 in the second.

But for better and for worse, Dunn has otherwise been amazingly consistent. In 2005-08, he had exactly 40 homers each year. In '09, he had 38. In five of the past six years, his RBI total has been between 100 and 106.

Dunn just is what he is.

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Category: MLB
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com