Tag:2010 Awards
Posted on: November 23, 2010 2:19 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:29 pm
 

Hamilton runs away with AL MVP

Josh Hamilton wins the American League MVP, and while it wasn't quite the landslide that Joey Votto's NL victory was, it wasn't close, either.

Hamilton collected 22 of the 28 first-place votes, had four second-place votes and two fourth-place votes for a total of 358 points. Detroit's Miguel Cabrera was second, finishing with five first-place votes and 262 overall points. Robinson Cano was third (229) and Toronto's Jose Bautista was fourth with one first-place vote and 165 total points.

Josh Hamilton Here's the final voting
Josh Hamilton, Rangers 358
Miguel Cabrera, Tigers 262
Robinson Cano, Yankees 229
Jose Bautista, Blue Jays 165
Paul Konerko, White Sox, 130
Evan Longoria, Rays 100
Carl Crawford, Rays 98
Joe Mauer, Twins 97
Adrian Beltre, Red Sox 83
Delmon Young, Twins 44
Vladimir Guerrero, Rangers 22
Rafael Soriano, Rays 21
CC Sabathia, Yankees 13
Shin-Soo Choo, Indians 9
Alex Rodriguez, Yankees 8
Felix Hernandez, Mariners 6
Ichiro Suzuki, Mariners 3
Jim Thome, Twins 2
Joakim Soria, Royals 1
Mark Teixeira, Yankees 1

An interesting note, both of the MVPs made their debut for the Reds in 2007, Hamilton on opening day and Votto after rosters expanded in September. The Reds traded Hamilton after the 2007 season to the Rangers for pitcher Edinson Volquez and Daniel Ray Herrera.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: November 16, 2010 2:58 pm
Edited on: November 16, 2010 3:07 pm
 

No Cy, but not a bad day for Wainwright

Adam Wainwright Sure, Roy Halladay got a silly little trophy today, unanimously winning the National League Cy Young Award, but Adam Wainwright picked up $21.1 million.

Second place doesn't look so bad now, does it?

By finishing in the top five of the Cy Young vote, the Cardinals' team options for 2012 ($9 million) and 2013 ($12 million) became guaranteed, according to Cot's Baseball Contracts . He also got a $100,000 bonus for finishing second in the voting.

That said, he would have gotten an extra $1 million for 2012 had he won the Cy Young, but he can still get that next season.

So congrats to Halladay for a deserving Cy Young victory, but you can forgive the second-place finisher for having a huge smile on his face.

UPDATE: Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch notes (via Twitter ) that for the options to become automatic, Wainwright has to be healthy at the end of 2011. That changes things, slightly, but still, not a bad day.

UPDATE: Damn fine print -- Goold also adds (again, on Twitter ) the two-year option would have been triggered with 170 innings or 27 starts and a healthy finish in 2011. But hey, at least he gets that $100,000 today. That should be enough for a nice celebration dinner.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.



Posted on: November 15, 2010 3:04 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:26 am
 

Two voters left Posey or Heyward off ballots

Andrew Baggarly of the San Jose Mercury News (via Twitter ) has gotten the breakdown of the BBWAA voting for Rookie of the Year and the four voters that broke with the consensus of Buster Posey and Jason Heyward as the National League's top rookies.

Dejan Kovacevic, the Pirates beat writer for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette , didn't vote for Heyward. He voted Posey first and then a pair of Pirates, Neil Walker and Jose Tabata.

Yasuhi Kikuchi of Kyodo News voted Florida's Gaby Sanchez first, followed by Heyward and St. Louis starter Jaime Garcia.

Sanchez's other first-place vote came from Greg Cote of the Miami Herald.

Hal McCoy of the Dayton Daily News gave Garcia his first-place vote.

UPDATE: Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chroicle has spoken to Kikuchi about his vote. Kikuchi said he didn't vote for Posey because of his May 29 call-up.

"Obviously it was a tough decision," Kikuchi said (via Schulman's Twitter ). "To me, Rookie of the Year is the best rookie player throughout the whole season."

UPDATE: Kovacevic checks in on Twitter with his reasoning:

"Felt very firmly about Posey, thus chose him 1st. Felt Walker/Tabata had strong years, comparable to rest of class. ... Neither Walker nor Tabata is off-the-board choice, as seen from list of NL rookies with 400 PA, ranked by OPS. ... Obviously saw way more of Walker/Tabata than others, but that also gave perspective on them performing at high level in poor lineup/setting."

The one problem with that is that Heyward was second in OPS among NL rookies with 400 plate appearances or more, ahead of Walker.

He is right that Walker isn't off the board. Tabata had a .746 OPS, more than 100 points lower than Heyward. It appears Kovacevic gave the local kids some recognition with his second- and third-place votes, but wanted to make sure his idea of the "right" player won.

"
Feeling always has been with voting that broadest variety of perspectives bring best results. Few can argue final overall tally, I'd think."

I don't agree, but see where Kovacevic is coming from. As an aside, having read Kovacevic for years, he's far from a homer, although he's already been accused of being one. I don't agree with his vote or even his reasoning, but isn't that why you have a vote instead of just a decision? In the end, the trophy is going to Posey and Heyward is second.


-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: November 15, 2010 2:22 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:36 am
 

Feliz, Posey win Rookie honors

Buster Posey Rangers closer Neftali Feliz and Giants catcher Buster Posey are your Rookies of the Year. No surprise, really.

The only question about today's results was which deserving National League rookie would win. Buster Posey ended up winning, taking the award over Atlanta's Jason Heyward.

While I would have voted for Heyward, I have zero problem with Posey winning. Both were incredible. What strikes me as interesting is the voting results, as Posey won comfortably, getting 20 of the 32 first-place votes and finishing with a total of 129 points. Heyward got nine first-place votes and 107 total points. I honestly thought it would be closer.

Three voters didn't vote for either, one voter went with Cardinals starter Jaime Garcia, while two voted for Gaby Sanchez.

The American League spread was about the same, as the National League. Feliz received 20 first-place votes and finished with 122 points. Tigers center fielder Austin Jackson finished second, with eight first-place votes and 98 total points. Twins third baseman Danny Valencia was third.

Pedro Feliz The difference, as discussed last week, was the caliber of candidates in both leagues. Feliz had a good year, but he's a closer, and that's a different role. Just for the record, let's look at the stats from the American League Rookie of the Year:

69 1/3 IP, 43 H, 21 R, 21 ER, 18 BB, 71 K, 2.73 ERA, .880 WHIP

Not bad numbers. Now let's look at a rookie in the National League who didn't garner a single vote.

68 IP, 56 H, 25 R, 22 ER, 17 BB, 92 K, 2.91 ERA, 1.074 WHIP

How about that? How did that guy not even get considered for the National League Rookie of the Year?

That's because he got hurt -- and he was a starter.

Stephen Strasburg made just 12 starts, but still pitched nearly as many innings as Feliz, who was the Rangers' closer. He didn't have 40 saves.

That said, Feliz definitely deserved the award.

The voting:
National League (points)
Buster Posey 129
Jason Heyward 107
Jaime Garcia 24
Gaby Sanchez 18
Neil Walker 3
Starlin Castro 3
Ike Davis 2
Jose Tabata 1
Jonny Venters 1

American League
Neftali Feliz 122
Austin Jackson 98
Danny Valencia 12
Wade Davis 11
John Jaso 3
Brandon Boesch 3
Brian Matusz 3

The National League Cy Young Award will be announced tomorrow.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 12, 2010 11:32 am
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:51 am
 

MLB Facts & Rumors National League MVP

The major baseball awards will be announced next week, and the staff at MLB Facts and Rumors is making our choices this week. Today, David, Evan and Trent name their National League Most Valuable Player selections. As with the BBWAA awards, a first-place vote is worth 14 points, second place nine, third place eight and so forth, with 10th place getting one point.

Albert Pujols has won three MVPs, including the last two. Pujols led the league in home runs (42) and RBI (118) and picked up both he Silver Slugger and Gold Glove at first base, but he certainly has a challenger at the same position in his very own division in Cincinnati's Joey Votto, who led the league in on-base percentage (.424) and slugging (.600) (and therefore, OPS as well). He also led his team to the playoffs for the first time in 15 years.

There's also Carlos Gonzalez, who like Pujols and Votto, flirted with the Triple Crown, and ended up winning the batting title with a .336 average.

So, how did the Facts & Rumors team see the NL MVP race? Well, here you go.

NATIONAL LEAGUE MOST VALUABLE PLAYER

Joey Votto David Andriesen
1. Joey Votto, Reds
2. Albert Pujols, Cardinals
3. Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies
4. Matt Holliday, Cardinals
5. Adrian Gonzalez, Padres
6. Carlos Gonzalez, Rockies
7. Ryan Zimmerman, Nationals
8. Aubrey Huff, Giants
9. Ryan Braun, Brewers
10. Dan Uggla, Marlins

How crazy is it that Albert Pujols can lead the league in home runs and RBI, put up an OPS of 1.011, and be seen as having an “off” year? That’s how high the bar is for that guy. I’ll have no problem with it if he wins his third consecutive MVP, I just think Votto was a hair better. The guy led the league in on-base percentage AND slugging percentage. And you can’t say his number are a product of the hitter-friendly ballpark in Cincinnati, because he hit 52 points better on the road than at home.

Evan Brunell
1. Joey Votto, Reds
2. Albert Pujols, Cardinals
3. Adrian Gonzalez, Padres
4. Carlos Gonzalez, Rockies
5. Brian McCann, Braves
6. Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies
7. Matt Holliday, Cardinals
8. Dan Uggla, Marlins
9. Ryan Zimmerman, Nationals
10. Andres Torres, Giants

Votto was transcendent, cracking the .400 OBP and .600 slugging percentage barrier and somehow outperforming Albert Pujols in virtually every category. The aborted chase for the Triple Crown was also fun while it lasted.

C. Trent Rosecrans
I voted for the NL MVP and the BBWAA asks voters not to release their ballots before the voting is announced, so I won't reveal my ballot yet. I will, however, post it and some of my thinking on Nov. 22 after the award is announced.

MLB Facts and Rumors National League Most Valuable Player
And Joey Votto wins his first MVP, while Pujols is second, followed by another first baseman, San Diego's Adrian Gonzalez. In this poll (of two), Carlos Gonzalez finishes fifth, after teammate Troy Tulowitzki. The real results come out Nov. 22, but expect Votto to top Pujols again.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: November 11, 2010 12:52 pm
Edited on: November 12, 2010 11:10 am
 

MLB Facts & Rumors American League MVP

The major baseball awards will be announced next week, and the staff at MLB Facts and Rumors is making our choices this week. Today, David, Evan and Trent name their American League Most Valuable Player selections. As with the BBWAA awards, a first-place vote is worth 14 points, second place nine, third place eight and so forth, with 10th place getting one point.

The American League MVP would have been easy if the season ended int he first week of September, but that's when Josh Hamilton crashed into a wall and broke a few ribs, sidelining him for nearly a month. Was that enough to give Detroit's Miguel Cabrera the MVP? Or was Jose Bautista's 54-homer season good enough to win the honor?

AMERICAN LEAGUE MOST VALUABLE PLAYER

Josh Hamilton David Andriesen
1. Josh Hamilton, Rangers
2. Miguel Cabrera, Tigers
3. Adrian Beltre, Red Sox
4. Jose Bautista, Blue Jays
5. Robinson Cano, Yankees
6. Evan Longoria, Rays
7. Paul Konerko, White Sox
8. Carl Crawford, Rays
9. Shin-Soo Choo, Indians
10. Joe Mauer, Twins

Hamilton led all of baseball in batting average and WAR (wins above replacement), while playing center field and dealing with nagging injuries. Yes, he only played 133 regular-season games, but Joe Mauer won last year with 135. Cabrera was scary good, finishing in the top
three in every Triple Crown category, but Hamilton played better with more on the line.

Evan Brunell
1. JoshHamilton, Rangers
2. Miguel Cabrera, Tigers
3. Jose Bautista, Blue Jays
4. Adrian Beltre, Red Sox
5. Robinson Cano, Yankees
6. Evan Longoria, Rays
7. Shin-Soo Choo, Indians
8. Carl Crawford, Rays
9. Paul Konerko, White Sox
10. Daric Barton, Athletics

Hamilton had a sublime season, leading baseball in batting average (.359) and slugging percentage (.633). In counting stats, his 30 HR and 100 RBI don't exactly blow anyone off the map, but don't forget he missed most of September.

C. Trent Rosecrans
1.  Josh Hamilton, Rangers
2. Miguel Cabrera, Tigers
3. Evan Longoria, Rays
4. Robinson Cano, Yankees
5. Jose Bautista, Blue Jays
6. Felix Hernandez, Mariners
7. Adrian Beltre, Red Sox
8. Shin-Soo Choo, Indians
9. Joe Mauer, Twins
10. Paul Konerko, White Sox

Hamilton missed most of September, but it didn't really mean anything to his team, because he was so good until that point that the Rangers had a cushion. There were other players with really good years, Cabrera and Cano among them, but they were still behind what Hamilton's amazing season. I think Longoria sometimes gets overlooked, but he doesn't deserve the nod over Hamilton. I do find it interesting that I'm the only one with a pitcher listed.

MLB Facts and Rumors American League Most Valuable Player
As good a season as Cabrera had, it's a runaway for Hamilton, who was unanimous in our small poll, followed by Miguel Cabrera and Jose Bautista. That said, expect Cabrera and maybe even Cano to garner first-place votes when the BBWAA announces its winners on Nov. 23, but Hamilton will still likely win by a comfortable margin.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.




Posted on: November 10, 2010 12:02 pm
Edited on: November 15, 2010 9:46 am
 

MLB Facts & Rumors Cy Young Awards

The major baseball awards will be announced next week, and the staff at MLB Facts and Rumors is making our choices this week. Today, David, Evan and Trent name their Manager of the Year selections. As with the BBWAA awards, a first-place vote is worth seven points, second place four, third place three, fourth place two and fifth place one.

While the National League award is for the best pitcher in the league, the American League vote seems to be a referendum on the BBWAA and its acceptance of newer statistics and abandoning the win as its basis for measuring a pitcher's success.

AMERICAN LEAGUE CY YOUNG AWARD

Felix Hernandez David Andriesen
1. Felix Hernandez, SEA
2. David Price, TB
3. CC Sabathia, NYY
4. Jon Lester, BOS
5. Jered Weaver, LAA

Some people will knock Hernandez for his team’s offensive futility, but I won’t. And if you take wins out of the discussion, he wins easily. Price edges Sabathia with an ERA nearly half a point better. If it seems strange Cliff Lee isn’t in this discussion, keep in mind he missed the first month of the season.

Evan Brunell
1. SP Felix Hernandez, SEA
2. SP CC Sabathia, NYY
3. SP Francisco Liriano, MIN
4. SP Jon Lester, BOS
5. SP David Price, TB

Lee stays off this ballot because in his time in Texas, he wasn't quite Cy Young-worthy as compared to full seasons of the above. Hernandez was otherworldly, but let down by one of baseball's worst offenses in history. With the run support of the Yankees, Hernandez very well could have reached 25 wins.

C. Trent Rosecrans
1. Felix Hernandez, SEA
2. David Price, TB
3. Francisco Liriano, MIN
4. CC Sabathia, NY
5. Cliff Lee, SEA/TEX

I think enough has been said about the Hernandez vs. the world, but I'm not sure Price or Liriano have quite gotten the credit they deserve. So many people have set it up as Hernandez vs. Sabathia, and I'm not so sure that's the right question.

NATIONAL LEAGUE CY YOUNG AWARD

Roy Halladay David Andriesen
1. Roy Halladay, PHI
2. Adam Wainwright, STL
3. Josh Johnson, FLA
4. Ubaldo Jimenez, COL
5. Tim Hudson, ATL

This one is really close, but I’m letting Halladay’s perfect game and NL lead in innings pitched put him ahead of Wainwright, who was second in the NL in wins and ERA. Jimenez came back to earth after his ridiculous first half, as did Johnson, who missed the last month but still finished with the ERA title.

Evan Brunell
1. SP Roy Halladay, PHI
2. SP Adam Wainwright, STL
3. SP Josh Johnson, FLA
4. SP Ubaldo Jimenez, COL
5. SP Tim Hudson, ATL

Halladay got more than he bargained for with Adam Wainwright neck-and-neck for the Cy race, but Halladay gets the nod due to innings pitched and xFIP, which clearly shows that Halladay was the better pitcher. His domination is evident to all.

C. Trent Rosecrans
1. Roy Halladay, PHI
2. Adam Wainwright, STL
3. Josh Johnson, FLA
4. Ubaldo Jimenez, COL
5. Tim Lincecum, SF

It seems to be hard to believe that Halladay didn't live up to expectations -- and considering some expected him to win 30 games, he didn't live up to the highest of expectation. But he still had an amazing season and should win this one going away against some pretty good competition. Still, the fact that Halladay did what he was able to do in a bandbox of a ballpark, it's quite impressive. Kind of like the Rookie of the Year, give me any of these guys in a Game 1 and I feel pretty good.

MLB Facts and Rumors AL Cy Young Award
It's at least a runaway here, as Felix Hernandez gets the nod, making stat-heads happy everywhere. CC Sabathia and David Price tie for what Ricky Bobby would call "first loser." I still have enough faith in the BBWAA that it'll get this one right, despite so many doubters.

MLB Facts and Rumors NL Cy Young Award
The voting isn't as close as the race, but Roy Halladay is the unanimous winner. Expect the real vote to be similar.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.



Posted on: November 9, 2010 4:06 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:28 pm
 

Jeter wins another Gold Glove

Oh, as we complain again and again about the Baseball Writers Association of America and their votes for MVP and Cy Young, the coaches and managers once again show they're not a better committee to choose the biggest awards in the game.

Exhibit A: Derek Jeter, Gold Glover.

Derek Jeter Yep, Jeter won the Gold Glove again on Tuesday in a vote from American League coaches and managers. Derek Jeter with a -5.4 UZR/150, -13 runs saved and -17 plus/minus, was determined by the coaches and managers to be the best defensive shortstop in the American League. Among qualified players, only Tampa Bay's Jason Bartlett (-13.8) and Kansas City's Yuniesky Betancourt (-9.2) had a worse UZR/150.

Sure, Jeter had just six errors, but the idea that errors tell you much about a player's defense is preposterous. It tells you who is able to make the routine plays best. That's well and good, but it has little to do with the best all-around defensive player. Jeter has the range of, well, a mediocre 36-year old defensive player. (You know how many times you see Jeter go into the hole and doing that leaping throw, but doesn't quite get the runner? Oh, what a gutty play, he doesn't get an E. Thing is, most other shortstops don't have to make that jump and get the runner.)

Who would be a better choice? Well, who wouldn't?

The Fielding Bible Awards had Chicago's Alexei Ramirez as its third-place finisher, and best among AL players. Ramirez's UZR/150 was 10.1, he had 16 runs saved and a 20 plus/minus.

In UZR/150, Ramirez was trailed by Oakland's Cliff Pennington (8.8), Baltimore's Cesar Izturis (5.8) and Texas' Elvis Andrus (0.3), among qualified players.

The Gold Gloves have been one of those openly mocked selections since a designated hitter won one in 1999 (Rafael Palmeiro). Defense, even in this day and age of advanced statistics, is still highly subjective, with reputation playing more of a role than production. That's what the Gold Glove tells us every year. It also tells us the coaches and managers have as much of a Yankee bias as the media is accused of having.

Alex Rodriguez was the only Yankee infielder not to be awarded, even though the advanced statistics liked Oakland's infield much more.

Mark Teixeira won at first base, even though Oakland's Daric Barton was likely the best choice. Mark Ellis had the top UZR/150 among second basemen (12.7), but the winner was Robinson Cano (-0.9).  Also deserving at second would be Minnesota's Orlando Hudson (12.0 UZR/150). Hudson was the top AL vote-getter in the Fielding Bible Awards, while Ellis was behind him.

As for the outfield, that's probably where a Yankee was actually left off. Left fielder Brett Gardner had the best UZR/150 of any qualified outfielders with a 27.9. He also won the Fielding Bible Award in left field.

American League Gold Glove winners
P Mark Buehrle, White Sox
C Joe Mauer, Twins
1B Mark Teixeira, Yankees
2B Robinson Cano, Yankees
3B Evan Longoria, Rays
SS Derek Jeter, Yankees
OF Carl Crawford, Rays
OF Franklin Gutierrez, Mariners
OF Ichiro Suzuki, Mariners

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.






 
 
 
 
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