Tag:Angel Pagan
Posted on: December 6, 2011 10:03 pm
Edited on: December 7, 2011 2:12 pm
 

Report: Mets, Giants agree to trade



By Matt Snyder

DALLAS -- The New York Mets have sent outfielder Angel Pagan along with either a player to be named later or cash to the San Francisco Giants for outfielder Andres Torres and relief pitcher Ramon Ramirez, the Giants announced Wednesday.

The Giants desperately need an offensive boost, yet don't really have any available money to sign free agents or take on expensive contracts via trade. Pagan, 30, doesn't exactly scream offensive powerhouse, but he had a better 2011 than Torres. Pagan hit .262/.322/.372 with seven homers, 56 RBI and 32 stolen bases last season for the Mets. He was a quality offensive player in 2009-10, though.

MLB Winter Meetings
Torres, 33, was a major piece of the puzzle for the Giants when they won the World Series in 2010, but he was bad in 2011. He hit .221/.312/.330 with four homers and 19 steals in 398 plate appearances.

Ramirez, 30, had a 2.62 ERA, 1.17 WHIP and 66 strikeouts in 68 2/3 innings last season. He definitely bolsters the back-end of the Mets' bullpen, where they also added Jon Rauch and Frank Francisco Tuesday. Bobby Parnell joins Ramirez and likely Rauch in setting up for Francisco.

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Posted on: November 29, 2011 10:55 am
Edited on: November 29, 2011 2:01 pm
 

Homegrown Team: New York Mets



By Matt Snyder


What if players were only permitted to stay with the team that originally made them a professional? No trades, no Rule-5 Draft, no minor or major league free agency ... once you are a professional baseball player, you stay in that organization. This series shows how all 30 teams would look. We give you: Homegrown teams. To view the schedule of this feature, click here.

Another day, another entry in our series. For this one, we'll stop over in Queens and meet the Mets. We know about Wright and Reyes, but what else is there? For one, a guy who just tied the postseason home run record. Knowing that the Mets traded him for Jorge Velandia has to be a bit painful for Mets fans (don't feel too bad, though, because the A's and Brewers gave up on Cruz, too). Anyway, let's dive in.

Lineup

1. Jose Reyes, SS
2. Daniel Murphy, 2B
3. David Wright, 3B
4. Nelson Cruz, RF
5. Ike Davis, 1B
6. Mike Carp, LF
7. Angel Pagan, CF
8. Josh Thole, C

Starting Rotation

1. Dillon Gee
2. Jonathon Niese
3. Philip Humber
4. Mike Pelfrey
5. A.J. Burnett

Bullpen

Closer - Heath Bell
Set up - Octavio Dotel, Jason Isringhausen, Matt Lindstrom, Bobby Parnell, Joe Smith, Guillermo Mota
Long - Aaron Heilman

Notable Bench Players

Drew Butera, Josh Satin, Ruben Tejada, Ty Wigginton, Lucas Duda, Fernando Martinez, Carlos Gomez and the imcomparable Wily Mo Pena. Also, Scott Kazmir is on this team. If he never left, would it have been possible that he was an upper-tier starter for years? We'll never know.

What's Good?

I like the bullpen. The bench is good, too. As a whole, one thing that stuck out to me is there aren't any really glaring holes. And assuming everyone is healthy, that's a pretty stout top four to five in the batting order. Reyes setting up for Wright and Cruz would be scary for opposing pitchers.

What's Not?

The starting rotation is a bunch of threes and fours. There's potential to better sure -- like if Burnett gets locked in for stretches -- but if we're looking at just the present, the lack of an ace would hurt as the season progressed, especially in terms of stopping modest losing streaks. The catcher and center field spots could be better as well, but, as I mentioned above, it's not like those are glaring holes. On the whole, while there aren't any real glaring holes, there's nothing that stands out as spectacular other than a healthy Reyes while Wright, Cruz and Bell are very good.

Comparison to real 2011

The real-life Mets were 77-85, and I think this bunch is a bit better than that. It's a team that would put up a winning record and maybe contend for a wild card. It's definitely not great, as the lack of an ace shows, but the weaknesses here are all pretty minor. I'm thinking mid-80s in wins with a ceiling of 90 and floor of high-70s? That sounds about right.

Next: Cincinnati Reds

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Posted on: September 22, 2011 9:10 pm
Edited on: September 27, 2011 1:46 pm
 

Who are the NL's worst defenders?

Wright

By Evan Brunell

Over the past week, Eye on Baseball has taken a look at the AL Gold Glove award winners, along with the deserving NL candidates. In addition, the AL's worst defenders were scoured, and now comes the senior circuit's recipients of tin gloves...

Catcher: John Buck, Marlins -- One of the most important things a catcher can do is to throw out baserunners. To be sure, it's a total package -- calling pitches, acting as the general on the field, blocking pitches, framing pitches... but that pesky baserunner problem is also an issue, and Buck scores very low here. Out of 95 would-be basestealers, Buck only caught 17 of them, or 17.9 percent. Of all catchers who qualify for the batting title in the game -- not just the NL -- Buck's posted the worst caught-stealing rate. His reputation in all other aspects of catching are muted at best.

First base: Prince Fielder, Brewers -- Fielder looks as if he should easily clear $150 million in a new contract this offseason and $200 million is not out of reach given the right motivated bidder. Whoever is acquiring him, though, will be doing so for his home-run bat as opposed his defense, which has been consistently awful. This is a player who would have been shoved into the DH spot in the AL had he come up with an American League team, but the Brewers have had to live with his glove at first. Fielder offers nothing at first beyond a human blob that can block the occasional grounder.

Second base: Dan Uggla, Braves -- Uggla battled Jeff Keppinger for this honor, but Uggla takes the cake here by leading all NL second basemen in errors with 15, flashing both awful range and stone hands. It's surprising the Marlins didn't move him to third a while ago, and the Braves will certainly try to shift Uggla to third base once Chipper Jones retires. Until then, Atlanta's going to have to hope that Freddie Freeman at first and their shortstop can cover enough ground for Uggla to make his mark with the bat.

Third base: David Wright, Mets -- If David Wright's .929 fielding percentage holds, it will be the lowest mark by a third baseman since  2007, excluding Mark Reynolds who has "bested" Wright's fielding percentage twice in 2011 and 2008. In 2007, Ryan Braun tallied a .895 fielding percentage and was moved to left, which was always inevitable. Before that, you have to go to Edwin Encarnacion in 2006. Errors aren't always an indication of how good a fielder is, but in Wright's case, he's making them in such copious amounts without the benefit of superlative range.

Shortstop: Yuniesky Betancourt, Brewers -- Was there any doubt? The Brewers knew that they would have a horrendous left side of the infield, but the club could only hope that Betancourt and third baseman Casey McGehee's offensive production outstripped what they lost on defense. That hasn't been the case, and Betancourt remains the worst shortstop by a mile in the game. Really, there's no excuse for his still being considered a shortstop.

Left field: Raul Ibanez, Phillies -- There isn't much that left fielders are asked to do. Stand out there with a glove, catch the balls coming your way and smash lots of home runs. Well, Ibanez hasn't quite delivered on these fronts, especially defensively where he combines a noodle of an arm with a lack of speed or quickness, making him a statue. He's fortunate he doesn't play for the Cubs, otherwise the ivy on the outfield walls would already have overtaken him.

Canter field: Angel Pagan, Mets -- Pagan came out of nowhere to be a solid contributor to the Mets the last two seasons, but things have fallen apart this year. He leads all NL center fielders in erorrs and while he has good reaction time, his hands just aren't soft enough and his arm is a wash, too. Pagan may well have lost any shot at starting again after the year he's had.

Right field: Lance Berkman, Cardinals -- As I keep bringing up, a right fielder's arm is more valuable than a left fielder or center fielder. Thus, a player's defense in right should be judged with a bit more notice as to the player's arm. Well, one of the worst arms in the league belongs to Berkman, playing right consistently for the first time in his career. The verdict? The Cardinal has a lousy arm and lousy range. Maybe Berkman should stick to first base.

Pitcher: Matt Garza, Cubs -- A pitcher's job on defense basically comes down to this: field the grounders back to you and act as an irrelevant fly-ball pointer-outer. So when you make seven errors in just 191 innings for a fielding percentage of .774, you aren't doing too well. That's Garza, who has made five throwing errors while muffing two grounders. Garza's only made 10 putouts and 14 assists, so 22.5 percent of his involvement in fielding plays have resulted in an error. That's not good.

You'll notice no NL West players landed on the list. That's not surprising. With San Diego and Los Angeles playing in pitcher's parks and San Francisco's stadium rather spacious as well, defense is at a premium. Colorado also needs to emphasize defense as well to take away hits and patrol Coors Fields' cavernous gaps.

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Posted on: June 27, 2011 2:14 pm
Edited on: June 27, 2011 2:27 pm
 

Rangers interested in Mets' K-Rod, Beltran

Carlos Beltran

By C. Trent Rosecrans


The Rangers have been on record as looking for bullpen help, and the Mets could be a possible trade partner, SI.com's Jon Heyman tweets.

Heyman notes the Rangers have expressed interest in both Mets outfielder Carlos Beltran and closer Francisco Rodriguez.

Last week Rodriguez noted he'd be fine moving into a setup role for a team that'll be in the playoff hunt, and the first-place Rangers (in a pretty weak division) certainly qualify in that regard.

More interesting is Beltran, who hasn't played center field this season. Last year he started 58 games in center, only to be replaced this season by Angel Pagan. Josh Hamilton has started nine games in center this season and 29 a year ago.

While Hamilton and Nelson Cruz have spent time on the disabled list, the other Rangers outfielders have gotten opportunities, but nobody's taken ahold of it. David Murphy is hitting .233/.310/.317 with four home runs in 226 plate appearances, while his OPS has dropped 179 points from last season. He's played mostly left this season but also center and right. 

The Rangers used three different starters in center field in this past weekend's series against the Mets. Hamilton started there Friday; Craig Gentry started Saturday; and former Met Endy Chavez started Sunday. Add to that, the player who has started the most games in center for the Rangers is Julio Borbon.

Besides Hamilton, of the other three, Chavez is the only one that has a homer (two) this season. All have respectable splits, but none has a long-term track record, much less one that compares to Beltran's.

Beltran is in the final year of his seven-year, $119 million deal with the Mets. He's making $18.5 million this season and has a full no-trade clause.

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Posted on: April 8, 2011 12:16 pm
Edited on: April 8, 2011 1:00 pm
 

Mets plan to be aggressive on bases

By Evan Brunell

PaganCiti Field is a pitcher's park. Everyone knows that, but that doesn't bother manager Terry Collins nor the players, who want to take advantage of the park's dimensions -- including the 414-foot gap in right-centerfield.

With the park the way it is, the Mets have to put a greater emphasis on speed and defense as opposed to, say, Rangers Ballpark in Arlington. That's OK with Collins, who plans to have the team run much more aggressively than seasons past as Newsday reports.

"It's like that NBA coach wanting a shot every eight (it's really seven) seconds," Collins said, referring to the Knicks' Mike D'Antoni. "The more shots you take, the more opportunities you have to score."

There will certainly be mistakes made, such as when David Wright, on first, tried to make it to third on a single with no out in a game with the Marlins. He was thrown out, violating a cardinal rule -- but Collins had no qualms with it, given how perfect the circumstances had to be to get Wright out. In the same vein, Angel Pagan busted his chops to get to third from first on a single against the Phillies and later scored on a passed ball. Pagan, for one, could directly benefit from a more aggressive approach after stealing 37 bases last season. It's entirely feasible he could crack 50.

"There's going to be some times where probably we get thrown out at third with nobody out," Wright said. "But if you're going to make a mistake, I'd rather see it done on the aggressive side. I think that we have to continually kind of remind ourselves that's how we're going to play and that's what's going to make us successful."

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Posted on: March 7, 2011 12:45 pm
Edited on: March 7, 2011 5:10 pm
 

Yankees' Gardner working on bunting

Brett Gardner

By C. Trent Rosecrans

In today's Pepper, we talked about Brett Gardner maybe getting a shot at supplanting Derek Jeter as the Yankees leadoff man. It makes perfect sense, Gardner is crazy fast and gets on base at a good clip.

The one thing he may have to improve upon is bunting. In 995 plate appearances in the big leagues, he has just 10 bunt hits. You'd think with his speed, which is truly elite, he'd try to lay down more bunts. 

"The last few years, I just kinda got away from it, it's something I didn't really try to do, I guess it's something I didn't use as much as I should have," Gardner told CBSNewYork.com. "It's not something I've completely lost, it's something I'm going to continue to work at, something that will make more of a complete player and give me another weapon to use to get on base, get guys over and put the ball in the defense's hands and make them make mistakes."

Gardner had 18 bunt hits in 251 plate appearances at Double-A Trenton in 2009 in 2006, so it's not like he can't do it.

I'm not normally a big fan of the bunt as an offensive weapon, but for someone with superior speed such as Gardner, it can be a game-changer. At the very least, just the danger of him laying down a bunt could benefit the Yankees.

Gardner said he's been good at sacrifice bunts, but needs to work on bunting for hits.

"The thing for me is, I could sit out here all day and practice and do it right and do it right and do it right, but in game situation, your adrenaline is pumping and I'm always try to put the ball on the ground and run," Gardner said. "So it's a matter of staying in there a split-second longer and making sure I get the bunt down and a good bunt and then run as opposed to running out of the box and losing my angle and letting the bat head drop and fouling the ball off, which is a bad habit I've gotten in the last couple of years. I'm much better on a  regular sacrifice bunt because I take my time and I don't rush and I make sure I put the ball on the ground where I want to and for the most part I've been able to do that when I slow things down."

Gardner had seven bunt hits last season, so he is working on it. Still, he was successful on just 36.8 percent of his attempts for a base bunt hit, it's something with work he could improve upon.

The Angels' Erick Aybar and Julio Borbon of the Rangers led the big leagues last season with 18 bunt hits, while only seven more players had as many as 10 bunt hits. Texas' Elvis Andrus had 13, while Angel Pagan, Gregor Blanco, Juan Pierre and Nyjer Morgan each had 12 bunts hits and Michael Bourn had 10. In that group, Blanco had the best percentage at 57.1 percent, while Pierre was the lowest at 21.8 percent.


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Posted on: January 17, 2011 7:01 pm
 

Mets batting order revealed

Terry Collins revealed his batting order to ESPN Sunday, with the first six spots etched in stone.

The skipper also promised that there would not be significant adjustments on a day-to-day basis.

That means, for a large percentage of Mets games, the lineup will kick off with:

SS Jose Reyes
CF/RF Angel Pagan
3B David Wright
RF/CF Carlos Beltran
LF Jason Bay
1B Ike Davis

There's two more spots up for grabs, but those will change depending on who wins the second base and catcher's roles. Josh Thole is expected to pair with Ronny Paulino behind the dish and the batting order could change depends on who starts. Paulino would make sense in the No. 7 spot against left-handers, for example, given his prowess against them.

The second-base job is less clear, with Luis Castillo, Ruben Tejada, Luis Hernandez, Brad Emaus and Daniel Murphy all battling for playing time. Murphy appears the heavy favorite and would likely bat seventh against right-handers with Thole eighth.

-- Evan Brunell

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Posted on: August 10, 2010 8:48 pm
 

Beltran has cleared waivers


Carlos Beltran Mets center fielder Carlos Beltran cleared waivers on Monday, FOXSports.com's Jon Paul Morosi reports , but a full no-trade clause and more than $24 million left on his contract makes that unlikely.

Beltran is under contract for $18.5 million next season.

Beltran had knee surgery in January and didn't return to the Mets until July 15.

Since returning, he's struggled, hitting .195/.300/.312 with one home run and seven RBI in 22 games. Angel Pagan played well in center with Beltran gone and is hitting .311/.370/.475 with nine homers and 50 RBI entering Tuesday's game.
-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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