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Tag:Don Wakamatsu
Posted on: October 25, 2011 6:38 pm
Edited on: October 25, 2011 8:20 pm
 

Report: Boston unlikely to hire a current manager

Ben CheringtonBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Although there have been whispers about the Red Sox trying to hire Toronto manager John Farrrell to replace departed manager Terry Francona, the Boston Herald reports that it's a "longshot" the Red Sox would hire a current manager.

The Blue Jays changed a policy allowing its employees to interview for any opening, meaning Farrell won't be a candidate in Boston. But if the team isn't going to hire a sitting manager, that means the Rays' Joe Maddon, Padres' Bud Black and Indians' Manny Acta are out as well.

The Herald lists the Blue Jays' Don Wakamatsu, Dodgers' Tim Wallach, Indians' Sandy Alomar Jr., Phillies' Pete Mackanin, Brewers' Dale Sveum and Yankees' Tony Pena as possible candidates. Of those names, only Wakamatsu and Pena have held full-time managerial positions before. Mackanin has twice been an interim manager.

During his news conference on Tuesday, new Red Sox general manager Ben Cherington told reporters he expects to begin interview soon and has a list of candidates. He did say the team would like previous managerial experience, but wouldn't require it.

"Previous managerial experience would be a benefit, but we're not going to put ourselves in a box by requiring that," Cherington said. "We'll certainly consider those that have previous managerial experience, but also those who don't. We need the right person. I don't think we can afford to put ourselves in any sort of box in our effort to find the right person."

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Posted on: September 30, 2011 11:31 am
Edited on: September 30, 2011 5:32 pm
 

Francona's out, who's next in Boston?

Bobby ValentineBy C. Trent Rosecrans

So, Terry Francona is out in Boston… who's next?

Here's several ideas:

Bobby Valentine: For the first time in a long time, he's not the heir apparent in Miami, as Ozzie Guillen has become the latest manager Jeffrey Loria is itching to fire. Valentine, 61, is currently an ESPN announcer, but he's managed the Rangers and Mets, as well as two stints as the manager for Japan's Chiba Lotte Marines. In MLB, Valentine has a record of 1,117-1,072 and appeared in one World Series, losing to the Yankees as the Mets skipper in 2000.

DeMarlo Hale: It wouldn't be sexy, but it would be a link to the recent regime in Boston. Hale has served as Francona's bench coach the last two seasons and was previously the team's third-base coach. Last year he interviewed for the Blue Jays job, which went to then-Red Sox pitching coach John Farrell. However, he could be seen as too close to the former regime and not enough of a change.

Joe Torre: If you want a big name, there are few bigger in managerial circles. However, there's questions whether the 71-year-old would want to manage again and even as well as he put up with the madness that is managing the Yankees, why would he want to enter another circus? He also didn't exactly light the world on fire as the Dodgers' manager.

Dave Martinez: The Rays bench coach is going to be one of the hottest names in potential managerial searches until he gets a gig. He's served as Joe Maddon's bench coach since 2008. Martinez retired in 2001 after 16 seasons in the big leagues.

Pete Mackanin: The Phillies bench coach has been an interim manager twice, in Pittsburgh in 2005 and in Cincinnati in 2007.  He's been the Phillies' bench coach the last three seasons. Mackanin may not be seen as a big enough name for the Red Sox.

Don Wakamatsu: The former Mariners manager was the Blue Jays' bench coach last season. Wakamatsu had a strange exit in Seattle after what seemed like a players' revolt. He failed to get along with some of his players in Seattle, and with talk of problems in the Red Sox clubhouse during the last month of the season, Wakamatsu's past could be a red flag.

Eric Wedge: The current Mariners manager has been mentioned, but he's under contract and the Mariners seem happy with him. It doesn't make sense for the Mariners to let him go to Boston.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: June 20, 2011 10:06 am
Edited on: June 20, 2011 4:01 pm
 

On Deck: How about a Zito-Soriano swap?


By C. Trent Rosecrans

BASEBALL TODAY: Is 80-year-old Jack McKeon the answer for the Marlins? MLB.com's Tom Boorstein joins Scott Braun to talk about the Fish, Albert Pujols and more. Click on the video above to hear about it all.

TRADE IDEA: There's an old saying that you don't trade players, you trade contracts. And there are hardly two contracts worse than those belonging to Giants lefty Barry Zito and Cubs outfielder Alfonso Soriano. Andrew Baggarly of the San Jose Mercury News suggests those two swap teams -- well, because it wouldn't hurt. Barry Zito would help out the Cubs' awful pitching, while Soriano would help the Gints' offensive worries. Soriano is paid through 2014, while Zito can be bought out before that season. The Giants would end up paying $7.75 million more in the deal, but Soriano is probably that much more valuable than Zito for them, considering the team's pitching depth.

Sure, both players have full no-trade clauses, so there's that, but it could happen. Baggarly notes he's just spitballing and that he hasn't heard anything about this kind of trade -- but it makes some sense. It's not totally unheard of for the Cubs, who made the bad contract swap with the Mariners before the 2010 season sending Milton Bradley to Seattle for Carlos Silva. It's an interesting thought, that's for sure.

MANAGING THROUGH PAIN: White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen was rushed to a Phoenix hospital Sunday morning where he passed a kidney stone before returning to Chase Field about two hours before the team's 8-2 victory over the Diamondbacks. [Chicago Tribune]

SPEEDY GONZALEZ: Red Sox first baseman Adrian Gonzalez legged out a triple Sunday for his 1,000th career hit. It was actually his third triple of the season, two more than Red Sox outfielder Jacoby Ellsbury. "I was telling Jacoby I have more triples than you do. What's going on?" Gonzalez told reporters after the game (via WEEI.com). "He just said, 'Hey, you're faster than me.'" And a better hitter. 

CLEAN PLAYS: Giants fans are sure to disagree, but Yankees catcher Russell Martin said the play in which Cubs first baseman Carlos Pena bowled into him on Saturday clean, and so was the hit that ended the season of Giants catcher Buster Posey. Martin said it's only a dirty play if the catcher is standing in front of the plate and the runner goes out of his way to hit him, which wasn't the case for Posey and the Marlins' Scott Cousins. [MLB.com]

WEBB STRUGGLES: Rangers right-hander Brandon Webb gave up six hits and four runs in two-thirds of an inning at Double-A Frisco on Sunday.

GOOD NEWS FOR Astros: An MRI revealed no structural damage in the elbow of right fielder Hunter Pence, who has a sprain in his left elbow. He is listed as day-to-day, but manager Brad Mills said he is "questionable" for the Astros' upcoming series against the Rangers. [Houston Chronicle]

NATS PLANS UNCHANGED: You may not have noticed the Washington Nationals are one of baseball's hottest teams, winning eight in a row before Sunday's loss and are now just 4 1/2 games out of first place in the National League Wild Card standings. That doesn't change Mike Rizzo's plans for the future. The biggest decision may be whether to deal starter Jason Marquis at the deadline. If the Nats go into another funk before the end of July, they'll likely deal him. [Washington Post]

GOOD IDEA: Orioles reliever Chris Jakubauskas picked up his first big league hit on Sunday and with that came his first play at the plate when third base coach John Russell waved him home on J.J. Hardy's double in the fifth inning. He was out by a mile. "My main thing was don't fall down, because when I hit third my legs got Jello-ey," Jakubauskas told MASNSports.com.

Mets HEALING: David Wright played catch and took ground balls on his knees Sunday and is expected to ride an exercise bike on Monday as he rehabs from a stress fracture in his lower back. He's expected to have more news after an evaluation later this week. Meanwhile, lefty Johan Santana is still long-tossing and hopes to return to the mound later this week. [Star-Ledger and ESPNNewYork.com]

SMOKELESS Rays: Tampa Bay will be wearing the uniform of the Tampa Smokers on July 2 for their yearly Turn Back the Clock game, but when they released the pictures of the jersey, the team isn't staying true to the team's old logo. The Rays are omitting the cigar pictured on the original jersey, which is just a shame. We all know smoking is bad for you, but if you're not going to actually want to show a cigar, you probably should honor a team called the "Smokers." [JoeRaysFan.com]

THE YANKEE STRIPPER: Need a gift idea for the Yankee fan who has everything? Well, how about a photo of a showering Joe DiMaggio?

A photo from a postage shower us up for auction at Lelands.com if you're interested in that sort of thing. [San Francisco Chronicle]

FATHERLY ADVICE: When the Blue Jays demoted Kyle Drabek to Triple-A, he made a call to his dad for some advice. That's a pretty good idea when your dad has 155 career victories and a Cy Young Award on his mantle. [The Canadian Press]

HEFTY BILL: I'm not sure how aware most casual fans are of this unwritten rule of baseball, but when a big league star has a rehab appearance at the minor-league level, the tradition is the big leaguer buys the postgame meal for the team. Zito says his four rehab starts have cost him $4,500. Somehow, I think he can afford it. [San Francisco Chronicle]

ANOTHER GOOD BAUTISTA FEATURE: Last week Jeff Passan of Yahoo! wrote a great feature looking at the backstory of Jose Bautista. This weekend the Toronto Star's Vinay Menon wrote another good look at the guy who may be baseball's best player right now.

ANOTHER FATHER'S DAY STORY: Former Mariners manager Don Wakamatsu tells the Toronto Star about his father and grandfather, who were in a Japanese-American internment camp in California during World War II.

HARPER RESTS: Bryce Harper sat out his second consecutive game on Sunday, as the Nationals determined he needed to rest more than play at this point. The Hagerstown Suns had been eliminated from winning the South Atlantic League first-half title, so they gave Harper some time off. Harper finished his first half of professional ball hitting .330/.429/.586 with 14 homers, 45 RBI and 13 stolen bases in 227 at-bats. He will certainly play at the South Atlantic League All-Star Game on Tuesday and may then be promoted to high-Class A Potomac for the start of the second-half of the Carolina League season starting on Thursday. [Washington Post]

BAD TRAVEL DAY: Tacoma Rainers broadcaster Mike Curto has the details on the Triple-A team's rough travel day on Friday that saw the team get to the park at 6:45 p.m. for a game that was scheduled to start at 7:05 p.m.

DOES BASEBALL NEED TO BE CHANGED?: The Los Angeles Times asked various people -- including a filmmaker, an actor, an artist and a physics professor -- about how to improve the game. Some of the suggestions are benign, some ridiculous and few give easy answers. But it's an interesting read, anyway.

VENTURA PAIN-FREE: There have been few baseball injuries as grotesque as the one former White Sox third baseman Robin Ventura suffered in a spring training game against Boston in 1997, when Ventura ran slid into Red Sox catcher Bill Haselman and then Ventura held his leg up with a dangling ankle. Today, he's pain-free after an ankle transplant. [Los Angeles Times]

PINGLESS: If you watched any of the College World Series this weekend, you noticed the ping of aluminum bats has been replaced by more of a thud sound. That's because college baseball changed to bats that perform more like wood this season. The results have been dramatic. [New York Times]

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: May 5, 2011 1:02 am
Edited on: May 5, 2011 1:06 am
 

Ump: 'We may have erred'

Joe Maddon

By C. Trent Rosecrans

It's not exactly Jim Joyce costing Armando Galarraga a perfect game, but don't tell that to Rays manager Joe Maddon.

Umpire Joe West said he "may have erred" in reversing a call in the Jays' 3-2 victory over the Rays on Wednesday.

West's explanation is a little confusing, so I'll start with describing the action first.

With one out in the seventh inning and the Jays leading 3-1, the Rays had runners on first and second and Sam Fuld at bat. Fuld hit a grounder to third, where Edwin Encarnacion fielded the ball, stepped on the bag and threw to first, where Adam Lind was pulled off the bag by Encarnacion's wide throw and tried to tag Fuld. West called Fuld safe.

Toronto's Don Wakamatsu, who was the acting manager after John Farrell was ejected earlier in the game, came out to protest and West quickly called Fuld out, ending the inning.

According to a pool reporter (via the National Post), West said second-base umpire Angel Hernandez told him he clearly saw that Lind made the tag. Hernandez also told West that Fuld had reached the base first, but West ignored that part.

"All I asked Angel was did [Lind] tag him, and Angel told me, 'I thought you had [Fuld] safe for being not he bag,'" West said. "I didn't heed that warning.

"I made the judgment based on what I had at first base. So it appears that we may have erred, but we did everything [by] protocol, right by the book. I don't know what else we could have done."

Joe Maddon came out and was promptly tossed from the game.

"If there's any particular play that screams for instant replay, it's that one," Maddon told reporters after the game. "I just don't understand how you can make that call from that distance. I don't believe you can see it properly. That was my argument."

Replays showed Fuld was likely safe -- and West was initially right that Fuld was safe and Hernandez was right that Lind did get a piece of Fuld -- even if it was after Fuld hit the bag.

In the end, Maddon's right -- replay would solve these problems and the game could have been different. A couple of years ago the umpires made a concerted effort to put their egos aside and confer more often on close calls. It was a step in the right direction, but it's about time to not just take steps in the right direction, but to reach the destination of fairness. In the end, the most important thing is getting the calls right, and it doesn't matter how that's achieved.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: March 16, 2011 8:40 pm
Edited on: March 16, 2011 10:31 pm
 

Griffey left to avoid being a 'distraction'

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Ken Griffey Jr.Ken Griffey Jr. returned to Mariners camp on Wednesday, the first time he was with his former teammates since abruptly retiring and leaving last June. He also spoke about his retirement for the first time in public, saying he left because he felt he had become a distraction to the team.

"I felt it was right for me to leave. I'm not going to [apologize]," Griffey told reporters, including the Seattle Times' Geoff Baker. "Because it's not intended to hurt people. It was a decision that I made. I made that 15 years ago … there are some people who are upset and some people who are not. I can't worry about it. I had to do what I thought was right for me."

The move upset some, but surprised none that had spent much time with him. Those who know Griffey know he'd long talked about retiring and just leaving -- with no fanfare, no press conference, nothing. Personally, I've heard him say it myself. And that's just what he did last year.

Griffey told team president Chuck Armstrong that he was retiring and started driving from Seattle to his home in Orlando.

Since then, he's spent most of his time doing what he loves the most, being a dad. His son Trey is a junior in high school and being recruited to play football. His daughter, Taryn, just led her high school team, Dr. Phillips, to a Florida state title in basketball as a freshman. He has another son, Tevin.

He's also recently went to the Philippines on behalf of the U.S. Department of State. He is now back with the Mariners as a special consultant.

Griffey said he's not talked to former Mariners' manager Don Wakamatsu -- "my phone rings," he said when asked several times about Wakamatsu.

"I just thought that it was best for me and the organization to retire," Griffey said (via MLB.com). "There was no fault. Things happen. I'm not upset. People thought I was upset about certain things. That wasn't the case. I just felt it was more important to retire instead of becoming a distraction."

The Seattle Times now has a full transcript of Griffey's press conference here.

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More MLB coverage

Posted on: November 16, 2010 7:10 pm
Edited on: November 16, 2010 9:12 pm
 

Mets have four managerial finalists

Mets third-base coach Chip Hale has been told he's a finalist for the managerial position, Ken Davidoff of Newsday tweets .

Previously there had been reports that the Mets were down to two finalists for their managerial opening, Bob Melvin and Terry Collins. Public opinion to those reports haven't been positive.

Mets general manager Sandy Alderson interviewed Cardinals third-base coach Jose Oquendo on Monday. The team has also interviewed Dave Jauss, Wally Backman, DeMarlo Hale and Don Wakamatsu.

UPDATE: Adam Rubin of ESPNNewYork.com quotes Alderson as saying the opening round of interviews is done.

"We hope to bring back several candidates over the balance of this week," Alderson said. "If everything goes as we hope, we could have the second round completed by the end of the week. There won’t need to be a Round 3. … I would say right now that it’s very possible we’d have a manager announced by Thanksgiving."

UPDATE: Backman will also get a second interview, Andy Martino of the New York Daily News tweets .

UPDATE: The Mets have confirmed they're down to the four finalists: Hale, Melvin, Collins and Backman.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.





Posted on: November 14, 2010 4:10 pm
Edited on: November 14, 2010 5:34 pm
 

Mets search down to two: Collins, Melvin

Despite Jose Oquendo interviewing for the Mets' manager's job tomorrow, it appears that the team is down to two -- Terry Collins and Bob Melvin, the New York Times reports .

Clint Hurdle interviewed for the job, but is apparently headed to Pittsburgh. Ken Oberkfell interviewed on Friday, but the Times writes "neither Oberkfell nor Oquendo are considered serious contenders for the job."

The Mets have also interviewed Chip Hale, Dave Jauss, Wally Backman, DeMarlo Hale and Don Wakamatsu.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.




Posted on: November 12, 2010 2:17 pm
 

Mets narrowing manager search

Terry Collins, Clint Hurdle and Bob Melvin are the Mets' "leading candidates" for their open managerial position, ESPNNewYork.com's Adam Rubin reports .

Rubin says current third-base coach Chip Hale could be called back for another interview, while Cardinals third-base coach Jose Oquendo could get an interview.

Hurdle has also interviewed for the still-vacant Pirates job, and appears to be the favorite there.

The Mets have already interviewed Dave Jauss, Don Wakamatsu, DeMarlo Hale and Wally Backman.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


 
 
 
 
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