Tag:Drew Pomeranz
Posted on: March 4, 2012 2:14 pm
Edited on: March 4, 2012 2:26 pm
 

Rockies' Alex White arrested for DUI

Alex WhiteBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Even as a reporter, when we covered spring training in Arizona, we were told not to drink and drive. Not that you should anywhere, but in the Phoenix area, they don't mess around.

Rockies pitcher Alex White learned the hard way. The 23-year-old right-hander was arrested Saturday night for driving under the influence of alcohol, the team announced on Sunday.

The Rockies released a statement on Sunday:
"We were extremely disappointed to learn that Alex White had been arrested last night. This type of behavior is taken very seriously by our organization, and through our discussions with him we know that he clearly understands the seriousness of his poor decisions, the harm that could have been inflicted on others and the embarrassment his mistake has caused himself, his family and the organization.

"Alex is taking full accountability for his actions with his teammates and manager.  The man we have grown to know is a dedicated teammate who has strong values that are grounded in his family and hard work. We believe he will learn from his unfortunate decision and clearly understands the severity of the situation."
White was acquired in the deal that sent Ubaldo Jimenez to Cleveland last year. The Rockies also acquired Drew Pomeranz, Joseph Gardner and Matt McBride in the Jimenez deal. Poemranz, who like White was a first-round pick by the Indians, was arrested last October in Oxford, Miss., for disturbing the peace. Those charges were dropped in January.

White made seven starts for the Rockies last season, going 2-4 with an 8.42 ERA, while going 1-0 with a 3.60 ERA in three starts for the Indians. Overall he was 3-4 with a 7.01 ERA. He went 2-1 with a 1.80 ERA in eight starts in the minor leagues, last season. He's in the mix this spring for a spot in the Rockies' rotation.

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Posted on: February 16, 2012 3:47 pm
 

Rockies won't limit Nicasio in spring training

Juan Nicasio

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Want a feel-good story? How about Juan Nicasio?

The Rockies' right-hander suffered a broken neck last August when he was hit by an Ian Desmond liner. Not only is Nicasio in camp with the Rockies, he's in line for a spot in the team's rotation.

"I am one of those people that didn't think we would be talking about him on Feb. 16 on how he has a very, very good chance to be a member of our rotation. But that's where we are at," Rockies manager Jim Tracy told Troy Renck of the Denver Post. "He's coming into camp with the mindset that he's making the team."

Tracy said Nicasio will have no limitations this spring and will even participate in the team's "ragball drills" where pitchers are graded on their ability to field comebackers.

As a rookie in 2012, Nicasio was 4-4 with a 4.14 ERA in 13 starts, dominating at Coors Field where he was 4-1 with a 1.98 ERA in seven starts (and 0-3 with a 7.04 ERA in six starts away from Coors).

The Rockies are set at the top of their rotation with Jeremy Guthrie and Jhoulys Chacin, but after that, the final three rotation spots are up for grabs. As Matt Snyder pointed out last week, there's plenty of candidates, with few answers. Among those gunning for a spot in the rotation in addition to Nicasio are Alex White, Drew Pomeranz, Guillermo Moscoso, Tyler Chatwood, Josh Outman and Jamie Moyer.

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Posted on: February 7, 2012 7:38 am
Edited on: February 8, 2012 3:47 pm
 

Spring position battles: National League West



By Matt Snyder


We are finally just a few short weeks away from spring training beginning, so let's continue looking at some positional battles that will unfold through February and March. Monday, we looked at the AL West and now it's time to look at the NL West.

Arizona Diamondbacks
None: None yet.

I understand this probably comes off as a bit lame, but look at the D-Backs depth chart and tell me where there are any legitimate battles. From the starting lineup to the rotation to the bullpen, it would appear the defending NL West champs have very few question marks heading into the 2012 season. I would keep an eye on last year's first-round pick, starting pitcher Trevor Bauer (maybe pushing Josh Collmenter to the long relief role at some point in June or July?), but it's very doubtful he fits in the rotation out of spring. He got knocked around (7.56 ERA, 1.68 WHIP) in four Double-A starts last season. So I've got nothing here. They are already set.

San Francisco Giants
First Base: Aubrey Huff vs. Brandon Belt

Is it time to pass the torch yet? The Giants had no patience with Belt last season, as the 23-year-old prospect was shipped back to the minors in April after just 60 plate appearances. He came back to stay in the middle of July, hitting .231/.296/.469 the rest of the way, but that was only in 142 plate appearances. And he did show good power, hitting eight homers in that stretch. In 111 career Triple-A games, Belt has a .441 on-base percentage and 20 home runs. Meanwhile, Huff is 35 and coming off a season where he hit .246/.306/.370 with just 12 homers in 579 plate appearances. With the additions of Angel Pagan and Melky Cabrera, it's unlikely the Giants shove Belt back in the outfield initially, so they must make a decision here. Do they leave Belt in Triple-A again, where he's proven he's a stud, have him ride pine in the bigs, or just move on past Huff and let Belt have the job?

Shorstop: Ryan Theriot vs. Brandon Crawford vs. Mike Fontenot

The 25-year-old Crawford is easily the best defender of this group, but at some point the Giants will need some offense. Crawford is a career .234/.291/.327 hitter in Triple-A. In 220 big-league plate appearances, Crawford hit .204/.288/.296 last season, so he's a complete offensive liability. Ryan Theriot hit .271 with a .321 OBP last year, and he also has no power. He does, however, have a career .282 average and .344 OBP. Fontenot hit only .227/.304/.377 last season, but he certainly has the most power of the trio here. Basically, there isn't really a good choice, but there's still one to be made. Of note: Fontenot and Crawford hit left handed, so maybe Theriot ends up platooning with one of them.

Los Angeles Dodgers
Left Field: Jerry Sands vs. Tony Gwynn Jr. vs. Juan Rivera

Did Sands' month of September give the Dodgers confidence he's ready to take over in left right away? It's possible. After hitting pretty poorly in his stint earlier in the season, Sands hit .342/.415/.493 with two homers, nine RBI and five doubles in 83 plate appearances in the last month. He's only 24, but he's also hit for great power in Triple-A (29 home runs in 418 plate appearances in Albuquerque last year). This one is all about him, with Gwynn being the backup option and Rivera being the desperation option.

Closer: Javy Guerra vs. Kenley Jansen

Guerra is the incumbent and successfully converted 21 of 23 save chances last season. He's only 26 and posted a 2.31 ERA, 1.18 WHIP in his 46 2/3 innings last season, too. So he's the obvious closer, right? I'm not so sure. The 6-foot-5 Jansen is only 24 and has elite closer written all over him. He had a rough start, but from June on, Jansen posted a 0.55 ERA, 0.67 WHIP with four saves, seven holds and zero blown saves. His stuff is nasty, as he struck out 96 hitters in 53 2/3 innings on the season. It looks like the sky is the limit, so would the Dodgers really leave him in the eighth inning due to Guerra's 2011 performance?

Colorado Rockies
No. 3-5 starting pitchers: Alex White vs. Drew Pomeranz vs. Juan Nicasio vs. Guillermo Moscoso vs. Tyler Chatwood vs. Josh Outman vs. Jamie Moyer

After stockpiling pitchers the entire offseason, it wasn't too surprising to see the Rockies trade away both Kevin Slowey and Jason Hammel. Of course, they got back Jeremy Guthrie and still have an absurd logjam behind Guthrie and Jhoulys Chacin. And Jorge De La Rosa will be back at some point later in the season (he had Tommy John surgery last June). White and Pomeranz are both young and inexperienced enough to justify more time in Triple-A, but they probably have the best stuff of anyone on the list. Chatwood got plenty of MLB experience last season, but he's still only 22 and his numbers weren't good. It's hard not to root for Nicasio, as he's coming back from a broken neck. He made some good starts for Colorado last summer, too. Outman's never really shown more than mediocrity and Moyer is 49. I very much like Moscoso's chances,  for one, as he's 28 and had a 3.38 ERA and 1.09 WHIP last season for Oakland. The ballpark difference in home games will be bad, but the NL West has fewer fearful hitters than the AL West and some spacious parks. So I'll officially predict Moscoso gets in, but beyond him, it's a complete toss up.

San Diego Padres
Catcher: Nick Hundley vs. John Baker vs. Yasmani Grandal

Hundley has had parts of four seasons to prove himself. Last season, he did hit well, with a .288/.347/.477 line, but injuries limited him to just 82 games. His career high, due to many different circumstances, is 85. The 31-year-old Baker has had the past couple seasons ruined due to an arm injury (Tommy John surgery and rehab took out nearly all of last season), but back in 2008-09 he hit .281/.364/.423 for the Marlins. The two could actually platoon, because Baker hits lefty while Hundley hits righty. Grandal, though, has loads of talent. He was the Reds' first rounder in 2010, is a switch hitter and has a career minor-league line of .303/.401/.488. He's only played four games in Triple-A, though, so he'd probably have to go nuts with his bat in the spring to get a shot out of the gate. The smart money is on the Padres going with Hundley as the primary starter, Baker as a backup who sees a good amount of playing time and Grandal spending most of the season in Triple-A. Maybe even a platoon with Hundley and Baker. Still, there's enough here for a potentially good three-way battle this spring. And you never know on Grandal. He jumped from High-A to Triple-A in 2011 and his experience before that was just eight Rookie League games in 2010. Maybe he's one of those guys that doesn't need much minor-league seasoning.

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Posted on: October 14, 2011 12:56 pm
Edited on: October 15, 2011 11:46 am
 

Drew Pomeranz arrested for disturbing the peace

By Matt Snyder

Rockies starting pitcher Drew Pomeranz has been arrested and charged with disturbing the peace by the Oxford Police Department in Mississippi. The arrest reportedly occurred at 1:25 a.m. Friday as Pomeranz exited a bar. He was released on a cash bond at 4:40 a.m. (The Oxford Eagle) No further details are known at this point.

Pomeranz, 22, is a very promising prospect. He was taken as the fifth overall draft pick in 2010 by the Indians after being an All American for Ole Miss. He then served as one of the main pieces of the trade -- along with fellow first-rounder Alex White -- that sent Ubaldo Jimenez to Cleveland. Pomeranz had a 1.78 ERA, 1.05 WHIP and 119 strikeouts in 101 minor-league innings in his first professional season in 2011 (spread across High-A and Double-A). He was promoted to Colorado late in the season and went 2-1 with a 5.40 ERA.

The Rockies have released the following statement:

"The Rockies organization is aware of the unfortunate incident involving Drew Pomeranz that took place in Oxford, Mississippi. We have been in contact with Drew and his representatives and we will continue to gather more information. Both Drew and our organization understand the serious nature of the situation."

Hat-tip: Troy Renck on Twitter

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Posted on: September 24, 2011 1:32 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Gio buries Angels



By Matt Snyder


Gio Gonzalez, A's. The Angels desperately needed this game and they had their ace on the hill. All-Star Game starter Jered Weaver worked 8 1/3 innings, allowing just two runs, but he was outdueled by Gonzalez. The A's left-hander allowed only three hits and one run in 7 1/3 innings and pretty much ended the Angels' postseason chances with a 3-1 A's win. They are eliminated in the AL West and have an absolutely minute chance in the wild card.

Ryan Braun, Brewers. MVP? He might well win it on the strength of Friday night's three-run bomb in the eighth, as the Brewers clinched the NL Central.

Jim Thome, Indians. Prior to the game, the Indians announced that they would erect a statue of Thome in Progressive Field. During the game, he reminded everyone why. In a 6-5 victory, Thome went 3-for-4 with a double, home run and three RBI.



David Price, Rays. The Rays really needed this one. Sure, the offense was stifled in a masterful performance by Blue Jays' pitcher Brandon Morrow, but Price didn't have a memorable night. At least not in a good way. He allowed five runs in six innings. The box score only shows two of those runs being earned, but that's because of two throwing errors Price himself made in a three-run third inning. And the Rays now have a very tough task in the wild-card race

Drew Pomeranz, Rockies. The 22-year-old rookie looked great in his first two big-league starts, but he got a wakeup call Friday night against the worst team in the majors. The Houston Astros lit him up for seven hits and six earned runs in just two innings.

The White Sox. Well, let's see. Bruce Chen absolutely owns them -- as he spun yet another gem against the Sox Friday night. The White Sox only managed two hits all game. Their pitching staff also allowed 18 hits and 11 runs, including nine extra-base hits to the Royals. Oh, and starting pitcher Zach Stewart also committed two errors. So other than a poor showing with offense, defense and pitching, it was a good night. Right?

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Posted on: September 12, 2011 12:49 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Fister continues to impress



By Matt Snyder


Doug Fister, Tigers. When you hear people talking about teams not wanting to face the Tigers in the first round of the playoffs because you don't wanna see Justin Verlander twice in a short series, do not forget the Tigers now have a very formidable No. 2. Fister was brilliant again Sunday in a 2-1 Tigers win over the Twins, allowing just three hits in seven shutout innings. Since coming over in a trade from the Mariners in July, Fister is 5-1 with a 2.28 ERA, 0.99 WHIP and 41 strikeouts in 51 1/3 innings. Meanwhile, the Tigers now have a better record than the Rangers and are five games behind the Yankees for the top seed in the AL.

Drew Pomeranz, Rockies. I wonder how long before the Indians want a mulligan on that Ubaldo Jimenez trade deadline deal? Pomeranz was one of the pieces the Rockies got back and the 21-year-old lefty dazzled in his major-league debut Sunday. He needed just 63 pitches to get through five shutout innings against the Reds, picking up the victory. He gave up just two hits and two walks.

Luis Valbuena, Indians. In the past two seasons, before Sunday, Valbuena was hitting .188 with two home runs in 345 plate appearances. So it was quite shocking to see the light-hitting middle infielder knock the ball around the yard Sunday. He went 3-for-5 with a home run and two runs scored in a 7-3 win over the White Sox.



Jon Lester, Red Sox. The Red Sox's starting rotation is in shambles, but Lester should have been the one cog -- with Josh Beckett injured -- that could be counted upon. Instead, he could only get through four innings, due to a massive pitch count, allowing four runs on eight hits and three walks. The Red Sox lost 9-1, and saw their lead in the Wild Card race shrink to 3 1/2.

Tim Hudson, Braves. Like the Red Sox, the Braves are reeling and needed a big start. With Hudson taking the hill, it seemed like a good time -- considering the Braves had won six of Hudson's past seven starts. Instead, Hudson was battered for six runs and eight hits in six innings and the Braves were swept by the Cardinals. Even worse, a once-commanding Wild Card lead has shrunk to 4 1/2 games.

Major League Baseball. I usually never complain about the rigidity of professional sports leagues when it comes to rules on uniforms because of the slippery slope principle, but not allowing the Mets to wear the NYPD, FDNY and PAPD hats for Sunday night's game was a farce. You can make one exception without being worried about the precedent set.

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Posted on: September 9, 2011 1:38 pm
 

Cook to receive one final start with Rockies

CookBy Evan Brunell

Aaron Cook will receive one last start for the Rockies at some point in September, the Denver Post writes. Until his next start is determined, which could be during the final homestand of the year, Cook will pitch in long relief.

Inning limits aren't why Cook's season is ending -- rather, the team wants to get a look at its younger pitchers. Drew Pomeranz has assumed Cook's turn in the rotation after recovering from emergency surgery for appendectomy after being dealt earlier in the season from Cleveland as part of the Ubaldo Jimenez package. Pomeranz will be debuting Sunday.

"It's never easy," Cook said of the news. "I told them I will take the ball whenever they need me to pitch. I am going to show up, work hard and keep my mouth shut."

The 32-year-old is the franchise leader in victories with 72 and enjoyed a nice run of success from 2004-09, including bouncing back from blood clots in his lungs in 2004. But over the last two years, Cook's ERA has been north of 5.00. He started the year sidelined with shoulder issues, as well as breaking his finger in spring training. Since debuting on June 8, the righty has made 16 starts with a 5.74 ERA. He's allowed eight homers and 35 walks in 91 innings, whiffing 38. Cook's game was never about stuff, as his bread and butter has been inducing groundballs. However, more balls have fallen into play this year than they should have, leading to his 5.74 ERA while xFIP suggests Cook deserves a 4.53 mark. Better, but still not great.

The Rockies certainly won't exercise Cook's $11-million option, leaving him as a free agent for the first time in his career. Despite his setbacks, Cook intends to keep pitching, even if it's not in Colorado.

"It would be nice to get another one here," Cook said of earning another start. "But it won't be my final one at Coors Field. I will be back. I am not retiring," Cook said. "I am healthy. I know I can still pitch in this league and help someone."

Cook should latch on with a job somewhere -- but given his pedigree to date, he may have to wait until deep into the offseason. Pitchers who can fill the back of a rotation are not in high demand, although Cook does offer potential of throwing 200 innings and serving as a third starter, which should boost his market -- plus the prospect of improving outside of Colorado's mile-high thin air.

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Posted on: September 6, 2011 7:35 pm
 

Rockies' Pomeranz to debut on Sunday

Drew PomeranzBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Just more than three weeks after undergoing an appendectomy, Rockies left-hander Drew Pomeranz will make his big-league debut on Sunday against the Reds.

The centerpiece of the trade that sent Ubaldo Jimenez to Cleveland, Pomeranz has just thrown 10 innings in Double-A since July 25. In two starts in the Rockies' system, Pomeranz has thrown 10 scoreless innings, including three perfect innings on Monday night, striking out three batters for Double-A Tulsa. In his organizational debut on Aug. 17, Pomeranz threw seven scoreless innings for Tulsa, allowing just two hits and striking out four. Overall this season, he's 4-3 with a 1.78 ERA in 20 starts, striking out 119 batters in 101 innings. Batters are hitting just .189 against him this season.

Pomeranz threw 47 pitches on Monday and will be on a  pitch count on Sunday against Cincinnati. 

"Obviously you're anxious to see that, just like you were anxious to see Alex White," Rockies manager Jim Tracy told the Denver Post. "He's left-handed, you've gotten rave reviews about what people in the organization have seen up to this point. … But Sunday he gets to face major league hitters and you get to find out that there's a little bit of difference between facing hitters in the Texas League and facing hitters in the major leagues."

Pomeranz was the fifth pick overall in the 2010 draft by the Indians and came over to the Rockies in the trade that also sent the right-handed White to Colorado along with first baseman/outfielder Matt McBride and right-hander Joseph Gardner.

White, the Indians first-rounder in 2009, has made three starts for the Rockies, going 1-1 with a 7.41 ERA. He had a no-decision in his Rockies debut on Aug. 23 and picked up his first win in the National League on Saturday, allowing five hits and four runs in five innings in a 5-4 Colorado win at San Diego. He also had three starts for the Indinas, going 1-0 with a 3.60 ERA with the Indians.

Since going to Cleveland, Jimenez has gone 2-2 with a 5.27 ERA in seven starts.

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