Tag:Frank Robinson
Posted on: December 19, 2011 1:10 pm
  •  
 

Orioles to improve ballpark, put up new statues



By Matt Snyder


Believe it or not, Oriole Park at Camden Yards is about to enter its 20th season. It was the park that changed everything, moving away from the cookie-cutter astroturf parks (Riverfront Stadium, Busch Stadium, Three Rivers Stadium, Veteran's Stadium, etc.) and back to a retro look. In honor of the 20th anniversary, the Orioles are making several improvements to the stadium -- and also erecting six statues.

The Orioles announced in a press release that "larger than life sculptures" of six Orioles greats will be progressively unveiled during the course of the 2012 season in the bullpen picnic grove, which will also be getting massive upgrades and "additional landscaping as part of a plan to turn the area into a ballpark oasis."

The six statues? They will depict Frank Robinson, Brooks Robinson, Cal Ripken Jr., Jim Palmer, Eddie Murray and, of course, Earl Weaver.

“We are excited and proud to honor the six greatest Orioles of all time,” said director of communications Greg Bader. “These legends will now have a more visible presence inside the ballpark, just as they are honored with retired number statues outside the gates. As we celebrate the 20th Anniversary of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, it seems especially appropriate to pay tribute to the past while looking forward to a bright future for the Orioles.”

Each of the six statues will be unveiled during a 2012 home game, with the Orioles greats on hand for their respective unveiling.

The Orioles also announced that there will be a new bar and seating area on top of the batter's eye in center field, an area previously inaccessible to fans. Several other improvements to concessions, concourse area and sight-line improvement will be done as well.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS feed and "like" us on Facebook.
Posted on: January 13, 2011 12:22 pm
Edited on: January 13, 2011 5:17 pm
 

Frank Robinson hospitalized


Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times is reporting via Twitter that Hall of Famer Frank Robinson was taken to a hospital today after experiencing dizziness and an irregular heartbeat during the owners meetings in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Baseball spokesman Pat Courtney said Robinson, 75, was "alert and conscious." Robinson works as senior vice president in the commissioner's office.

We'll have more as it becomes available.

UPDATE: An MLB spokesman tells the Washington Post that Robinson has been undergoing tests and is resting. "So far, everything is coming back good," the spokesman said.

UPDATE: USA Today reported that Robinson has been released from the hospital and returned to the meetings.

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Category: MLB
Posted on: July 8, 2010 4:30 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:58 am
 

1999: the Kid steals the show

In anticipation of the 2010 All-Star Game in Anaheim on Tuesday, July 13, the CBS Sports MLB Facts and Rumors blog looks back at some of the more memorable editions of the All-Star Game. Today looks at the 1999 All-Star Game.

I sat slack-jawed with a tape recorder rolling and no questions in my head, just a desire for the answers to never stop coming.

It was a hotel ballroom in Boston, and Warren Spahn and I were among four or five stragglers in there. He was telling the story of his epic 16-inning, complete-game performance against Juan Marichal and the Giants at Candlestick Park in 1963. It was at least the second time Spahn had told it that day and likely the 10th, and I'd even heard it once before, but I listened again. Just as he mentioned Willie Mays' homer, someone walked into the room and said it was time for Spahn to go.

He apologized, said he could go on for hours and I told him I could listen for more. An hour before, the room had been full of the greatest major-league players in history. Mays was there, so was Marichal, not to mention Hank Aaron, Johnny Bench, Bob Gibson, Frank Robinson, Brooks Robinson -- pretty much everywhere I turned, I bumped into a Hall of Famer.

While All-Star Games are naturally filled with All-Stars, the 1999 game was different. It was filled with bigger stars than just the usual names, even in this, the summer following the Mark McGwire-Sammy Sosa slugfest before it lost its luster. They were there, as was Ken Griffey Jr. at the height of his popularity. Pedro Martinez was making hometown fans think the curse may be bunk. But still, among all the All-Star Games in the history of the exhibition, this was less about the game and the current players than any other.

The 1999 game was not only at one of the country's most historic ballparks, Fenway Park, it was also coming at the time of an endless stream of best-of-the-century lists. But baseball's list, its Team of the Century, was kicked off in a different fashion than any other.

While other places talked of history, it was on display in Boston. Most people didn't see this part, because it was before MLB had 24 hours a day to fill with TV programming, but baseball announced its 100 greatest players of the 20th century in a news conference with the vast majority of the living members of that club in attendance in a hotel ballroom in Boston.

It was an amazing display of the game's greats, and after an entertaining hour-or-so, the players were brought into another room for one-on-one interviews. It was an hour of baseball geek bliss. At 23, I was slightly intimidated and more than happy to listen in on the conversations of the likes of Willie McCovey, Robin Yount, Mike Schmidt and Yogi Berra, among others.

Ted Williams, Pete Rose and Sandy Koufax weren't there, but it was hard to complain about their absence -- or the two from the dais that skipped the one-on-ones, Stan Musial and George Brett, although with Missouri roots, those were the two I'd hoped to interview more than the others.

Ted Williams By the time the all-time greats were introduced on the field the night of the game, I thought I was goose-bumped out. Until, right in front of my seat in the right field auxiliary press box, came Williams in on a golf cart. He did a lap and ultimately was the center of attention as he prepared to throw the first pitch.

It was a moment. A moment for baseball, a moment for baseball fans across the country to share their memories with another generation of fans -- to share their own stories of seeing Mays or Mantle play. In short, it was the rare moment when the ceremonial first pitch outshines the real first pitch. Even future Hall of Famers like Cal Ripken Jr. and Tony Gwynn seemed to grasp the special nature of the moment. We all did -- those at Fenway and even those watching at home.

Martinez went on to become the first All-Star pitcher to strike out the side in the first inning, fanning Barry Larkin, Larry Walker and Sosa to start the game. He then struck out McGwire to lead off the second, bringing to mind Carl Hubbell's 1934 feat of getting Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmy Foxx, Al Simmons and Joe Cronin consecutively. It was an impressive display, even after Matt Williams broke Martinez's strikeout streak, reaching on an error. Martinez would win the game and the MVP, but even before he faced Larkin, the game had earned its spot in history.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

More All-Star memories -- 2002: The Tie ; 1949: First integrated edition ; 1941: Teddy Ballagame's walk-off homer

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com