Tag:Fred Wilpon
Posted on: February 16, 2012 6:42 pm
Edited on: February 16, 2012 9:41 pm
 

Reaction to the death of Gary Carter

Gary Carter

Gary CarterBy C. Trent Rosecrans


The passing of Hall of Fame catcher Gary Carter has brought an outpouring of emotion from those in and around baseball.

We'll collect many of the statements from those around baseball here.

MLB commissioner Bud Selig:
"Driven by a remarkable enthusiasm for the game, Gary Carter became one of the elite catchers of all-time. 'The Kid' was an 11-time All-Star and a durable, consistent slugger for the Montreal Expos and the New York Mets, and he ranks among the most beloved players in the history of both of those franchises.  Like all baseball fans, I will always remember his leadership for the '86 Mets and his pivotal role in one of the greatest World Series ever played.
"On behalf of Major League Baseball, I extend my deepest condolences to Gary’s wife Sandy, their daughters Christy and Kimmie, their son D.J., their grandchildren, his friends and his many fans."

Statement from Mets chairman & CEO Fred Wilpon, president Saul Katz and COO Jeff Wilpon:
"On behalf of everyone at the Mets, we extend our deepest and heartfelt condolences to Gary’s family -- his wife Sandy, daughters Christy and Kimmy and son D.J.  His nickname 'The Kid' captured how Gary approached life. He did everything with enthusiasm and with gusto on and off the field. His smile was infectious. He guided our young pitching staff to the World Series title in 1986 and he devoted an equal amount of time and energy raising awareness for a multitude of charities and community causes.  He was a Hall of Famer in everything he did."

Former Mets general manager Frank Cashen:
"The genesis of the trade was that we wanted to add a big bat to the lineup. He did that right away, but perhaps more importantly was the way he handled our young pitchers. He was the perfect guy for so many reasons."
 
Former Mets manager Davey Johnson:
"Gary was a one-man scouting system. What people didn’t know was that he kept an individual book on every batter in the National League. He was the ideal catcher for our young pitching staff."

Gary CarterFormer Mets teammate Darryl Strawberry:
"What he added to the team was character. His approach to the game was contagious. It spread to the rest of us. He helped each of us understand what it took to win."

Former Mets teammate Dwight Gooden:
"I relied on Gary for everything when I was on the mound including location, what pitch to throw and when. Even when I didn’t have my best stuff, he found a way to get me through the game. He was just a warrior on the field."
 
Former Mets teammate Wally Backman:
"He was like a big brother to me.  I always went to him for advice. No matter what time of day it was, he always had time for you."
 
Former Mets teammate Tim Teufel:
"The baseball community has lost a Hall of Fame player and a Hall of Fame person. He was a good man and will be missed terribly."

Former Mets teammate Mookie Wilson: 
"The one thing I remember about Gary was his smile. He loved life and loved to play the game of baseball."

Hall of Fame catcher Johnny Bench (on Twitter):
"I am so sad! The Kid has left us. I started calling him Kid the first time I met him. He was admired and loved. Thank you for our past"

Former Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda:
"Gary Carter played for me with so much respect and enthusiasm for the game he loved. He was a Hall of Famer as a player and as a man. On behalf of the entire Dodger organization, we love him and will miss him."

MLB Players Association executive director Michael Weiner:
"We are saddened by the news of Gary Carter’s passing. Gary was one of the greatest players of his generation and his enthusiasm and passion for the game will live on in the hearts and minds of those of us fortunate enough to have watched him play. Our thoughts and prayers go out to Gary’s family, his former teammates and his legion of fans in the U.S. and Canada.”

Former Expos teammate Steve Rogers:
"Learning of Gary’s passing feels as if I just lost a family member. Gary and I grew up together in the game, and during our time with the Expos we were as close as brothers, if not closer. Gary was a champion. He was a 'gamer' in every sense of the word – on the field and in life. He made everyone else around him better, and he made me a better pitcher. His contributions to the game, both in Montreal and New York, are legendary and will likely never be duplicated. My heartfelt condolences go out to his wife, Sandy, and children, Christy, Kimmy and D.J., and to his many friends and fans."

Hall of Fame pitcher Bert Blyleven:
"We both grew up in Southern Cal, though he was 3-to-4 years younger than I was. He was a great ballplayer and a tremendous family man, and I'll miss him."
 
Hall of Fame catcher Carlton Fisk:
"We had a lot in common, from family to our profession. He endured a lot as a catcher, as did I. And making it to the Hall of Fame was over the top for Gary, as it has been for me. We knew each other for more than 30 years, he meant a lot to me. I'm crushed by his passing."
 
Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver:
"Nobody loved the game of baseball more than Gary Carter. Nobody enjoyed playing the game of baseball more than Gary Carter. He wore his heart on his sleeve every inning he played. For a catcher to play with that intensity in every game is special."
 
Hall of Fame manager Dick Williams:
"Johnny Bench was the No. 1 catcher of the 70s. Gary Carter (was) the No. 1 catcher of the 80s."

Hall of Fame Jane Forbes Clark:
"It is with profound sadness that we mourn the loss of Hall of Fame catcher Gary Carter. Gary’s enthusiasm, giving spirit and infectious smile will always be remembered in Cooperstown. Our thoughts are with Sandy, Christy, Kimmie, DJ and the entire Carter family on this very sad day."

Current Mets pitcher Jonathon Niese, who played for Carter in the minors:
"The one thing Gary stressed to us was team. He said individual goals were meaningless. He said the name on the front of the uniform was more important than the name on the back. That's what I’ll take from my two years with him."

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Posted on: January 28, 2012 11:59 am
Edited on: January 28, 2012 12:03 pm
 

Mets headed for dubious payroll record in 2012

By Matt Snyder

After losing upwards of $70 million last season, the Mets are set to drastically lower payroll in 2012. We knew that. But an ESPN.com report from Friday noted just how severe the drop will be. In fact, it's likely to be historic. With a payroll ESPN.com projected at $90.7 million for the coming season, it would represent a drop of $52.1 million -- reportedly the largest payroll drop in MLB history.

The previous "record" was held by the Texas Rangers' drop from 2003 to 2004, when they shed the likes of Alex Rodriguez, Rafael Palmeiro and Juan Gonzalez from the payroll. In all, the Rangers slashed $48.4 million in player salaries, but the Mets are poised to blow past that. These Mets have shed the contracts of Jose Reyes, Carlos Beltran and Francisco Rodriguez, among others, from the opening-day payroll of 2011.

As long as Fred Wilpon's ownership group is in charge, the Mets will continue to find ways to generate any kind of revenue they can while also trying to not alienate their fan base -- as they wish to remain owners of the club. They have lowered ticket prices for the 2012 season, but will that keep the turnstiles moving frequently enough to turn a profit for the season? The NL East appears loaded, as the Nationals are up and coming while the Marlins just went on a winter spending spree. We know how good the Braves and Phillies are. Slashing payroll in record fashion is hardly the best way to convince your fans the team is trying to field a winner in one of the best divisions in the majors. 

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Category: MLB
Posted on: December 21, 2011 9:59 pm
 

Meet the Mets, step right up and buy the Mets

Mr. Met

By C. Trent Rosecrans

For $250 you can get a share in the NFL's Green Bay Packers, earning a nice little certificate and the right to call yourself a part owner of the Super Bowl champs. But for just $19,999,750 more, you can hang out with Mr. Met, and can you really put a price tag on that?

The Mets are searching for 10 or so minority partners to buy four-percent shares in New York's National League franchise for a paltry $20 million each.

The New York Times recently got the summary sheet for interested bidders and passed along the listed perks:

• Access to Mr. Met, although the terms of access are vague. For my $20 million, I want a night of debauchery in Las Vegas with Mr. Met -- nothing like a guy with a giant baseball head making it rain.

• A business card that says "owner." Of course, I already have one of those because you can get a whole box of 200 on the internet for $20 (just $20, not $20 million).

• An invitation to a "owner's workout day" so you can run around the bases at Citi Field. I did that once before too, but it was kid's day and they said I couldn't run the bases because I was too old, but I didn't listen and did it anyway. And it only cost me a $23 ticket from a scalper. 

• A parking spot. I don't really need it, I prefer to take the subway when I go to Citi Field.

• A chance to throw out a first pitch every year. From the field, not the stands as you curse out David Wright.

• A team executive that will help with tickets and other needs, although extra tickets may cost extra.

• Hot dogs, green grass all out at Shea, guaranteed to have a heck of a day. 

Presumably, you also get an invitation to the comedic stylings of the Wilpon family revue. Oh, and there are promises that an investor can get their money back after six years. Seriously, how could a financial deal with the Wilpons not work out? I know I'll be checking my piggy bank and see if I can maybe talk them into a cool looking certificate too. 

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Category: MLB
Posted on: July 4, 2011 10:27 am
Edited on: July 4, 2011 10:38 am
 

Report: Mets working to keep Reyes

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Jose ReyesIf Mets general manager Sandy Alderson has his way, free-agent-to-be shortstop Jose Reyes won't just finish this season in a Mets uniform, but will also start next season at Citi Field.

The New York Post reports Alderson is "leaning strongly toward authorizing a substantial offer after the season" to keep Reyes, and there is "almost no way" Reyes will be traded before the July 31 deadline.

Reyes has said he didn't want to negotiate during the season.

Earlier this season, Mets owner Fred Wilpon told the New Yorker that Reyes "thinks he's going to get Carl Crawford money" and "won't get it."

Carl Crawford money, it should be noted, is $142 million over seven years.

It will likely take at least $100 million to sign Reyes for the next five or six years, and the Post reports the Mets ownership would be willing to offer close to $20 million per season to keep Reyes.

Reyes has also said in the past he'd prefer to stay with the Mets.

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Posted on: June 21, 2011 12:42 pm
Edited on: June 21, 2011 2:45 pm
 

Wilpon to GM: Free to spend, but see us first

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Fred WilponIf the Mets find themselves in contention a month from now, adding payroll won't be an issue, or so says team chief operating officer Jeff Wilpon.

Wilpon, speaking to Dan Martin of the New York Post, says Sandy Alderson won't have his hands tied by ownership when it comes to adding players.

"He'll have all the opportunity in the world to bring anybody he wants in," Wilpon said. "The way for him to do that is to bring the ideas to us and we'll talk about it. But he does not have restrictions. We'll deal with everything on a case-by-case basis."

Alderson, publicly at least, says that sounds well and good and he'll be looking. But a lot can change between now and the trade deadline. The Mets are 35-37 and 9 1/2 games out of first in the NL East and five games back in the wild card, with five teams ahead of them and tied with Pittsburgh and Washington.

"Tied with Pittsburgh and Washington" is usually not a phrase used by teams looking to make a playoff push with trades, even if the Pirates and Nationals are improved this season.

The good news for Mets fans may be that the same philosophy appears to be in place for the players currently on the roster, including shortstop Jose Reyes, who is a free agent after the season.

When asked if the Mets still have hope that they can re-sign Reyes, Wilpon told the Post: "Why wouldn't we?"

Well, if you have to ask ...

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Posted on: June 9, 2011 7:47 pm
Edited on: June 9, 2011 8:01 pm
 

Disgruntled Mets fans make anti-owner shirts

By Matt Snyder

First things first: The Mets are far too much of a punching bag for opposing fans. They entered Thursday with a 29-32 record. That's not good, but it's not exactly horrible. Considering all the injuries, the players who are actually on the field haven't been bad at all. Still, many Mets fans are disgruntled with the ownership situation, especially since they'll likely see either David Wright or Jose Reyes gone sometime soon. Thanks to the Bernie Madoff ponzi scheme, owner Fred Wilpon and COO Jeff Wilpon are having serious financial issues, and the league may soon have to intervene.

In that vein, there are T-shirts for sale on timetoselltheteam.com. (Click thru to view them all.)

Two of my favorites:

- "Who Madoff With My Team?"

- "TWO DOWN, TWO TO GO ... OMAR JERRY FRED JEFF

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Category: MLB
Posted on: June 3, 2011 9:55 am
Edited on: June 3, 2011 10:40 am
 

Pepper: Sabean over the top in his comments



By C. Trent Rosecrans
 

BASEBALL TODAY: CBSSports.com senior writer Danny Knobler joins Lauren Shehadi to discuss the chances of the Marlins, Brewers and Diamondbacks sticking around all season.

SABEAN OUT OF LINE: Buster Posey's injury is the story that just won't die -- and it flared up again on Thursday when Giants general manager Brian Sabean ripped Scott Cousins on a San Francisco radio station.

Sabean intimated there would be some sort of retaliation the next time the Giants saw the Marlins' Cousins. For a general manager to imply his team would be looking to hurt another player is irresponsible and reprehensible -- especially when Cousins played within the rules. You can bet Bud Selig will be making a call to Sabean and there will plenty of eyes on the Giants when they head to Florida Aug. 12-14.

Not only were Sabean's comments unprofessional, they're also hypocritical. Baseball Prospectus' Larry Granillo takes a look at Pablo Sandoval's similar play last season against the Pirates, and also a play from 2006 which was worse that happened to the Giants' Todd Greene, but caused no public outrage from Sabean.

Cousins' agent, Matt Sosnick, answered, saying his client has already gotten death threats, which probably won't be helped with Sabean flaming the fire. He also noted Cousins feels terrible about hurting Posey.

"The fact that Posey got hurt is terrible and everyone feels terribly about it," Sosnick told Andrew Baggerly of the San Jose Mercury News. "No one feels worse, outside of Posey, than Scott did. But it's over. The play was within the rules; it was a fair, legitimate play. There’s no way Scott could know in the heat of the moment if there was a sliding lane of not.

"It was legal in baseball. He helped his team. The fact someone got injured on the play stinks.

"I understand Sabean is upset about it. Based on the fact that I know he’s a good guy, I am really hoping that he was speaking in the heat of the moment and out of emotion. Because if he wasn't, he took a bad situation and certainly made it a lot worse."

WEBB SHUT DOWN: Rangers pitcher Brandon Webb felt discomfort in his right shoulder in a bullpen session on Thursday and is being shut down. He has been prescribed anti-inflammatories and will be shut down for a minimum of seven days. (MLB.com)

9 TEAMS VIOLATE DEBT RULES: We all knew the Dodgers and Mets were in financial trouble, but they're apparently not alone. According to a Los Angeles Times report, a total of nine of the 30 teams are in violation of the MLB debt service rules which limit team's debt levels to 10 times its annual earnings. The guilty teams are a mix of big and small market teams -- the Mets, Dodgers, Orioles, Cubs, Tigers, Marlins, Phillies, Rangers and Nationals.

DRAFT BONANZA: While the Rays may have more picks than anyone else in next week's draft, the Diamondbacks have the most valuable picks. In one of the deepest drafts in years, Arizona has a chance to pick up two impact players, drafting No. 3 and No. 7 overall. (Arizona Republic)

Yankees' MISSED OPPORTUNITY: UCLA right-hander Gerrit Cole may be the top pick (or at least in the top three) next week, but it won't be the first time he's drafted in the first round. The Yankees took him in 2008, but he decided to go to UCLA instead. (New York Daily News)

WRIGHT, WILPON OK: David Wright finally spoke to Mets owner (for now) Fred Wilpon and said "all is well." Wright is one of the players Wilpon criticized in a New Yorker article. (New York Post)

Things should continue to be good with Wright and Wilpon, because it's unlikely he's going anywhere. Earlier this week there were rumors Wright may be moved, but the New York Daily News reports Wright's option for 2013 is team-specific, meaning only the Mets could exercise it. Any other team would risk losing Wright to free agency following the 2012 season. Anyway, it doesn't make much sense to sell low on Wright right now anyway, so expect him to stay with the Mets.

JETER WATCH: Derek Jeter currently has 2,984 hits and he acknowledges he feels a bit of a "responsibility" to reach 3,000 at Yankee Stadium. At his current pace, he'd get hit 3,000 at Wrigley Field in Chicago against the Cubs on June 18. Oddly enough, another Yankee had a chance at a milestone at Wrigley Field recently -- Roger Clemens' third shot at his 300th win was at Wrigley Field in June, 2003, but he lost that game. He won in his next start -- at Yankee Stadium against the Cardinals. The Yankees have a 10-game homestead from June 7-16 before going to Chicago for three and Cincinnati for three, returning home on June 24. Selfishly, I'd love to see Jeter go for 3,000 in Cincinnati, just so I could see it in person. It'd be more fitting for him to get it in New York, though. (New York Daily News)

DISAPPOINTMENTS: What do Ubaldo Jimenez, Chris Carpenter, Adam Dunn, Albert Pujols and Carl Crawford have in common? Well, they're all rich. Besides that, they're also on SI.com's Joe Sheehan's All-Disappointment Team. I'd take all five of those guys in a heartbeat. They're a discappointment because they haven't lived up to their own high standards so far, all five have the ability to turn it around in a heartbeat.

GRITTY AND GUTTY: Sure, these gifts are a little too prized by old-timers and not prized enough by new-school thinkers. Whatever their worth, those kind of players are fun to watch -- and the Padres have one in Chris Denorfia. As a personal note, Denorfia is one of the really good guys in the game and I'm glad to see him doing well. (San Diego Tribune-Review)

HARPER SHINES, STRUGGLES: In one game, Bryce Harper showed exactly why he's too good for the South Atlantic League, but also not quite ready to be called up to the next level. In addition to a walk-off homer, Harper fell victim to the old fake-to-third-throw-to-first move and was also caught in a rundown. (Washington Post)

CURE FOR THE CURSE? The Cubs are 5-0 in throwback uniforms -- now if they'd just wear them all the time… (BleedCubbieBlue.com)

FOR THE SNEAKERHEADS: Move over Brian Wilson, Orioles pitcher Jeremy Guthrie has the coolest spikes on the planet. Guthrie has a pair of Air Jordan I spikes that are just plain awesome. (NikeBlog.com)

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Posted on: June 1, 2011 11:27 pm
Edited on: June 1, 2011 11:36 pm
 

Einhorn has right to buy majority share of Mets

By Evan Brunell

The New York Mets's new minority owner in David Einhorn has the ability to purchase 60 percent of the team in five years, reports SI.com's Jon Heyman.

It's unclear how both sides will determine a price for Einhorn to upgrade, but current owner Fred Wilpon is able to block the deal. If Einhorn decides to upgrade his ownership stake, Wilpon can repay Einhorn his $200 million investment, which would block Einhorn's move as well as reduce his minority share to 16.5 percent. (A previous report had Einhorn retaining the 33 percent stake after repayment.)

Heyman's sources say that there's zero chance Wilpon allows Einhorn to make a move for majority ownership unless Wilpon is forced to pay the $1 billion -- or some other significant amount that would cripple his ability to run the Mets -- that Bernie Madoff trustee Irving Picard is demanding. It's unlikely that Picard will be able to justify or collect that ripe sum, but could still make life very difficult for Wilpon.

Einhorn also has the ability to buy the rest of the team should Wilpon be forced to sell at any time.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com