Tag:Latroy Hawkins
Posted on: February 22, 2012 7:41 pm
Edited on: February 22, 2012 7:51 pm
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Angels sign Jason Isringhausen

By Matt Snyder

Relief pitcher Jason Isringhausen has signed a minor-league deal with the Angels, the club announced Wednesday evening.

Isringhausen, 39, didn't pitch in the majors in 2010, but had a 4.05 ERA and 1.29 WHIP in 46 2/3 innings last season for the Mets. He even gathered seven saves, which put him at exactly 300 in his career -- good for 22nd on the all-time list.

The Angels appear to be moving forward with youngster Jordan Walden as the team's closer, but they did land the veteran depth they seeked this offseason in LaTroy Hawkins and now Isringhausen. The latter two and Scott Downs will be the bridge to Walden, but any of the three could take over if the 24-year-old -- who had 10 blown saves last season -- falters.

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Posted on: December 7, 2011 11:43 pm
 

Angels agree to sign LaTroy Hawkins

By Matt Snyder

DALLAS -- The Angels have signed themselves a free agent pitcher. Nope, not C.J. Wilson (yet?). Relief pitcher LaTroy Hawkins has signed with the Angels for one year and $3 million, reports Scott Miller of CBSSports.com.

Hawkins, 38, will join his ninth team, which is quite remarkable since he'd only played with one (the Twins) through age 30. He was terrible for the Brewers in 2010 before putting together a great bounce-back season in 2011. He had a 2.42 ERA and 1.24 WHIP in 48 1/3 innings.

Unless the Angels swing a deal for a closer -- which feels unlikely -- Hawkins will serve as the setup man for young Jordan Walden.

Full Winter Meetings Coverage | Free Agent Tracker

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Posted on: November 25, 2011 3:09 pm
Edited on: November 26, 2011 1:38 pm
 

Homegrown Team: Minnesota Twins



By C. Trent Rosecrans


What if players were only permitted to stay with the team that originally made them a professional? No trades, no Rule-5 Draft, no waivers, no minor- or major-league free agency ... once you are a professional baseball player, you stay in that organization. This series shows how all 30 teams would look. We give you: Homegrown teams. 

For years, the Minnesota Twins were the model of how to build a consistent winner in a small market. From 2001-2010, the Twins appeared in the playoffs six times and recorded just one losing season. But the wheels fell off in 2011, with a mixture of bad fortune and bad pitching. The Twins have two former MVPs in their lineup, but it would be tough to find two former MVPs who did less in 2011 than Justin Morneau and Joe Mauer. Those two homegrown players were supposed to be cornerstones for the franchise, but their performance last season was more fitting a tombstone. The team's fortunes, for better or worse, will be tied to those two for the next few years.

Lineup

1. Denard Span, CF
2. Michael Cuddyer, 3B
3. Joe Mauer, 1B
4. Justin Morneau, DH
5. Torii Hunter, RF
6. Jason Kubel, LF
7. Wilson Ramos, C
8. Danny Valencia, 2B
9. Tsuyoshi Nishioka, SS

Starting Rotation

1. Matt Garza
2. Nick Blackburn
3. Kevin Slowey
4. Brian Duensing
5. Anthony Swarzak

Bullpen

Closer - Jesse Crain
Set up - LaTroy Hawkins, J.C. Romero, Pat Neshek, Glen Perkins, Grant Balfour, Peter Moylan

Notable Bench Players

A.J. Pierzynski, Ben Revere, Luke Hughes, Trevor Plouffe.

What's Good?

With Ramos and Pierzynski on the roster, there's zero reason for Mauer to get anywhere near catching gear -- unless it's for another commercial. With Mauer freed of pitching duties, he can concentrate on first base and Justin Morneau doesn't have to worry about playing in the field. Even though Morneau is a very good defensive first baseman, keeping him off the field could keep him on the field. Last year he suffered concussion-like symptoms after merely diving for a ball. Limiting his risks for a recurrence of head injuries should be a top priority for the Twins, and the easiest way to do that solves the team's other big problem, getting the most out of their long-term deal with Mauer. While the Twins don't have anyone on this list with a large number of saves on their resume, there are a ton of good relievers.

What's Not?

It's a good thing the team has good relievers, because they're going to need them -- and even more than the seven listed above. The rotation, after Garza, is shaky. That rotation isn't going to get much help from its defense, either. The roster makeup requires several position shuffles, including Cuddyer to third, a position he's played, but is not too keen on playing. The Twins also have to put Nishioka at shortstop. Although he played there some in 2011, the team signed Jamey Carroll to play shortstop every day in 2012 for a reason.

Comparison to real 2011

Well, if you thought it couldn't get much worse in Minnesota than it did in 2011, it may with this lineup and rotation. Minnesota went 63-99 in 2011, and it probably breaks the 100-loss barrier with this squad, but don't expect them to be historically bad, so it'd probably only cost four-to-eight wins in my unscientific research. Either way, it's an ugly summer in Minneapolis.

Up next: Pittsburgh Pirates

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Posted on: November 1, 2011 5:40 pm
Edited on: November 1, 2011 10:20 pm
 

Team-by-team NL free agency outlooks



By C. Trent Rosecrans

With open free agency set to hit us at 12:01 a.m. Thursday, it's worth taking a quick look at what every single team is going to be looking for. We've already done detailed breakdowns in the R.I.P. series, so here are some quick hitters for the National League:

East
Atlanta Braves | R.I.P.
Needs: shortstop, corner outfielder, relief pitching
Money to spend?: Not much. The Braves' biggest need was getting rid of Derrek Lowe, and they did that and have saved $5 million to boot. The team has good, young starters, but put too many innings on their bullpen. They'll need more bullpen arms and also a bat in left field and a shortstop. With Tyler Pastronicky just about ready, the team could use a veteran backup just in case he doesn't work out.

Miami Marlins | R.I.P.
Needs: starting pitching, center field
Money to spend? Oh yeah… with the team preparing to move into a new stadium, owner Jeffrey Loria is expected to make a splash in free agency and could raise payroll to the $100 million range. South Florida will be a favorite of baseball agents in the offseason who will use the Marlins as leverage -- they may even be more popular than the "mystery team" of the past off seasons. The Marlins will be rumored as a possible landing point for nearly every big free agent. The question is, which ones -- if any -- will actually take their talents to South Beach.

New York Mets | R.I.P.
Needs: starting pitching, closer, relief pitching, middle infield
Money to spend? There are plenty of questions about the Mets ownership group, so nobody outside GM Sandy Alderson really knows what's going on and how much money he has to play with. It doesn't look like the team will go crazy in trying to re-sign Jose Reyes. The team will instead hope to improve its bullpen and rotation.

More Free Agency
Position rankings

Philadelphia Phillies | R.I.P.
Needs: shortstop, corner outfielder, closer, relief pitching, first base
Money to spend? It seems like they always find it when they need it, so there's no real concern about the budget. Even with Roy Oswalt likely to leave Philadelphia, there are few worries about the team's rotation. The bullpen, however, will need to be addressed. Ryan Madson may be re-signed and used as the closer, but the Phillies need middle-innings guys, as well. Left field is still an issue and the team could look to upgrade there, but will also need to address first base while Ryan Howard recovers from his Achilles injury. John Mayberry Jr. can play first, but moving him there creates a spot in the outfield.

Washington Nationals | R.I.P.
Needs: center field, starting pitching, relief pitching
Money to spend? Oh yeah. Like the Marlins, the Nationals have money to spend and unlike the Marlins, they have shown a willingness to actually use it. Last year the team overspent on Jayson Werth, something that certainly caught the eyes of free-agents-to-be. Several top names will certainly be courted by the Nationals, including Albert Pujols, Prince Fielder and C.J. Wilson. The Nationals really can't be counted out on anyone.

Central
Chicago Cubs | R.I.P.
Needs: first base, third base, closer, relief pitching, right field
Money to spend? The Ricketts opened the pocketbooks for their general manager, so it's unlikely they'll close 'em for players. Epstein says he wants to build a team from the bottom up, but that takes time and there will be pressure to win right away, and free agency will be part of that. Expect the Cubs to at least talk to the likes of Pujols and Fielder, even if they don't sign them. With Epstein in the fold, it'll certainly be interesting to see what route the Cubs take.

Cincinnati Reds | R.I.P.
Needs: closer, relief pitcher, corner outfielder, shortstop
Money to spend? Not much. It looks like the team will stand pat in the rotation, but after not picking up the option on Francisco Cordero, Cincinnati will need someone to finish out games. Last year Walt Jocketty stayed quiet during the offseason, but this winter that may not happen. However, the team is more likely to use the trade market than spend big in free agency.

Houston Astros | R.I.P.
Needs: shortstop, relief pitching
Money to spend? The Astros are in full-on rebuilding mode, as evidenced by their July fire sale. There's also the holdup of the sale of the team and the possible switch to the American League. If Jim Crane is approved by MLB, he may want to find his own general manager. The Astros won't be much of a player in the free agent market, looking for low-priced.

Milwaukee Brewers | R.I.P.
Needs: first baseman, shortstop, third baseman, relief pitching
Money to spend? Some -- for the right people. The team will try to make a pitch to retain Fielder and possibly Jerry Hairston Jr., but are likely celebrating to be free of Yuniesky Betancourt. The team probably won't be in the race for Reyes or even Jimmy Rollins, but could be in the market for a second-tier shortstop like Clint Barmes. They'll also need to add some arms in the bullpen, but could try to re-sign the likes of Takashi Saito and LaTroy Hawkins.

Pittsburgh Pirates | R.I.P.
Needs: catcher, first base, shortstop, corner outfielder, starting pitching
Money to spend? Yes, as much as $25 million or even a little more, but they also have plenty of holes. The Pirates took some steps forward in 2011, but will need to fill out their roster and will likely be going for the second-tier players to fill out a lineup around Andrew McCutchen, Neil Walker, Jeff Karstens, Kevin Correia, Charlie Morton and James McDonald.

St. Louis Cardinals | R.I.P.
Needs: First base, shortstop, relief pitching
Money to spend? Some for the right player. The Cardinals have nearly $60 million tied up for 2012 in six players -- Matt Holliday, Kyle Lohse, Lance Berkman, Chris Carpenter, Adam Wainwright and Jake Westbrook. There's also the little matter of Pujols -- who will listen to offers from the Cardinals, but is unlikely to give much (or any) of a hometown discount. The team also needs a shortstop and could use another left-handed reliever.

West
Arizona Diamondbacks | R.I.P.
Needs: second base, middle infield, relief pitching
Money to spend? There's not much tinkering expected of a team that surprised everyone by winning the NL West in 2011 -- the rotation is looking good and most of the positions are already manned. The team declined its option on second baseman Aaron Hill, but could also look at former Diamondback second baseman Kelly Johnson. The bullpen was radically rebuilt last season, but could use some tweaking.

Colorado Rockies | R.I.P.
Needs: starting pitching, second base, third base
Money to spend? The team needs a starter and also two infield spots -- all without spending much money. They could be looking to trade to find their infielders and a lefty reliever. But they also need a pitcher that can throw 200 innings in a season, but those don't come cheap on the open market. They'd also like a right-handed bat.

Los Angeles Dodgers | R.I.P.
Needs:catcher, second base, third base, starting pitching, relief pitching
Money to spend? Who knows? With the Frank McCourt mess, nobody knows what the future holds for the Dodgers. If they are sold, the timing may still be off for any big additions to the budget. In a perfect world, the Dodgers are looking at the big names like Fielder, Reyes and Wilson, but it doesn't seem like that will happen.

San Diego Padres | R.I.P.
Needs: closer, relief pitching, corner outfield, middle infield
Money to spend? The Padres have money to spend and spots to fill -- but don't expect them to be wooing the big names. Big money in San Diego is still small money to the likes of the Phillies and Cubs. The highest-priced free agent likely to sign with San Diego is closer Heath Bell.

San Francisco Giants | R.I.P.
Needs: shortstop, corner outfielder
Money to spend? The Giants will spend for the right player, and Reyes may just be that player. Or Rollins. The team may also try to retain Carlos Beltran, but at his age and injury history, the Giants are unlikely to gamble with a multiyear contract.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: October 16, 2011 8:54 pm
 

Marcum exits early in Game 6

Shaun Marcum

By C. Trent Rosecrans

MILWAUKEE -- Before Game 6 of the NLCS on Sunday, Brewers manager Ron Roenicke said the decision to start a struggling Shaun Marcum was "the right decision."

And it was. For the Cardinals.

Marcum was booed as he walked off the mound in the first inning, giving up four runs before his team took a single swing of the bat.

Even before David Freese hit a three-run homer, Roenicke had LaTroy Hawkins warming up in the bullpen. It took two very good defensive plays (and a questionable call by home plate umpire Mike Winters) to get the first two outs of the inning, as Marcum gave up a single to Jon Jay, a walk to Albert Pujols, an RBI single to Lance Berkman and Freese's homer in a four-run first. Marcum needed 27 pitches to get out of the inning.

Yuniesky Betancourt made a good running play on a popup by leadoff man Rafael Furcal in short left to start the inning before giving up a single to Jay. Jay stole second, and then after Pujols walked, Berkman singled and took second when Brewers center fielder Nyjer Morgan overthrew his cutoff man in a futile attempt to get Pujols at third.

The Brewers seemed to get the break they needed when Holliday hit a weak grounder back to the mound and Marcum scooped the ball to catcher Jonathan Lucroy to get Pujols at the plate. While the throw beat Pujols (barely), Lucroy tagged his back leg after his front leg had crossed the plate.

There wasn't much time to dwell on that, as Freese hit the first pitch he saw from Marcum over the fence in left. To give St. Louis a 4-0 lead.

Left-hander Chris Narveson started the second with the Brewers trailing 4-1 (Milwaukee's run came on a Corey Hart leadoff homer).

In three postseason starts, Marcum is on the hook for his third loss and pitched 9 2/3 innings, allowing 17 hits and 16 earned runs, good for a 14.90 ERA. 

"I really feel good about this decision," Roenicke said before the game. "Whether he pitches well tonight or whether he gets hit a little bit, this is the right decision. For this ball club, it's the right decision. And I've had many conversations with a lot of people in this organization that have been with us all year. This is definitely the right decision.

"It doesn't mean that he's going to go out and have a great game. I expect him to. I think he's definitely capable of doing it. He has not liked the way he's pitched the last couple of games. And I think he's going to have a good game today."

Roenicke was wrong, but his reasoning in sticking with Marcum was that he didn't want to go with Yovani Gallardo on short rest, and if he did, he had few other choices for a starter in Game 7.

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Posted on: April 24, 2011 7:11 pm
Edited on: April 24, 2011 7:40 pm
 

Hawk steals show in Milwaukee

Miller Park Hawk
By C. Trent Rosecrans

Randy Wolf allowed just four hits over eight innings, but a hawk stole the show at Miller Park on Sunday.

With the roof closed at Miller Park, a hawk hunted another bird and was the center of attention for much of the Brewers' 4-1 victory. The hawk attacked the other bird in center field in the top of the third and then hung out around Astros right fielder Hunter Pence in the bottom half of the inning.

"Whatever that was, a pigeon, it looked scared. It looked at me like, why is the roof closed? I can't get out of here," Wolf told reporters, according to the Associated Press. 

Wolf said the bird also "buzzed my tower" during his third victory over the season. Brewers catcher Jonathan Lucroy said he thought the bird was going to attack.

Astros second baseman Bill Hall was close to the bird in its third inning.

"He was on the outfield grass, hanging out. Wasn't a lot of action [in his direction] during the time he was out there," Hall said. "I don't know when he got up and flew away. Obviously, he was having a good time out there."

It was apparently a good thing neither Hall nor Pence approached the hawk.

"It's really unlikely for a bird like that to get aggressive, unless somebody was coming after him, trying to pick him up or getting to close to his nest," Heather Neldner, a zookeeper in the Milwaukee County Zoo's aviary, told MLB.com's Adam McCalvy. "If he's just sitting there, minding his own business, it's unlikely that he would go after a random person."

And like any celebrity, the Miller Park Hawk had his own Twitter account created during the game -- @MillerParkHawk. The hawk, of course, is following Pence, @HunterPence9, on the social networking site.

After the game, Brewers pitcher LaTroy Hawkins noted on Twitter it was indeed a hawk, and write "At least one Hawk was seen Today!" And, of course, it should be noted Hawkins was the favorite Brewer of the hawk, according to @MillerParkHawk.

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Posted on: April 6, 2011 10:38 pm
 

Three Brewers (not Greinke) on rehab trail

By Evan Brunell

ParraThe Brewers got some good news on three of their injured players as all are beginning rehabilitation assignments -- and no, none are Zack Greinke.

Veteran reliever LaTroy Hawkins, sidelined due to recovering from labrum surgery last August, will pitch for Class A Brevard County on Friday, while starting catcher Jonathan Lucroy will head to Double-A Thursday to begin his return from a broken finger.

Lastly, reliever Manny Parra will make an appearance on Saturday for Class A Wisconsin. Parra threw two simulated innings at Miller Park on Wednesday and came through it with flying colors. If the Brewers can get Parra back quickly, it could be a big shot in the arm. While Parra has clearly shown he can't start, he does have promise in the bullpen.

Returning from an injury to his back, Parra (pictured) is encouraged by his process.

"I’m at the point now where I don’t even think about it," he told MLB.com. "I get my treatment and do other stuff to maintain where I’m at right now, but I’m past [the injury]. I felt really good. I just have to get my endurance up. You can run all you want, but it’s not the same as throwing."

Parra is expected to toss one inning Saturday, conduct a bullpen session a few days later and then pitch two or more innings in another game. The Brewers may want to lengthen Parra out for a possible return to the rotation should Marco Estrada and Sergio Mitre flop in their auditions with the team.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb  on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: March 26, 2011 7:23 pm
 

Officially on DL, Greinke begins throwing

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Zack GreinkeDespite officially being placed on the disabled list, Saturday was a good day for the Brewers' Zack Greinke, who played catch for the first time since he was shut down with a cracked rib.

"He said he felt great," manager Ron Roenicke told reporters, including Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. "The pain is gone."

Greinke's DL trip is retroactive to March 22, meaning he could technically come off of the DL a week into the season, but that's highly unlikely. The team won't have any kind of timetable until he gets back on the mound, and that's likely a couple of days away.

Greinke suffered the injury early in the spring playing basketball.

The team also officially put LaTroy Hawkins (shoulder) and Manny Parra (back) on the DL, also retroactive to March 22. Right fielder Corey Hart (oblique) and catcher Jonathan Lucroy (finger) will also start the season on the DL.

With Greinke on the disabled list, the Brewers are expected to break camp with four starters and decide on another starter when they need one, April 6 against the Braves.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com