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Tag:Mike Flanagan
Posted on: August 26, 2011 12:34 pm
 

Orioles to honor Flanagan

By Matt Snyder

The Baltimore Orioles have announced plans to honor former pitcher Mike Flanagan, starting with Friday night's game against the Yankees. Flanagan died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound earlier this week.

Flanagan played for parts of 15 seasons with the Orioles, during which time he was 141-116 with a 3.89 ERA. He won the 1979 AL Cy Young award and played in two World Series for the Orioles, including the 1983 World Champions. He also served the organization as an executive, broadcaster and coach.

From the official Orioles' press release, here's what the organization is going to do to honor Flanagan.
· Beginning with tonight’s game against the New York Yankees, Orioles uniformed personnel will wear a black circular patch with “FLANNY” written in white on their right jersey sleeves for the remainder of the 2011 season.

· A black banner with the number “46” in orange has been installed just above the press box and below the booth where Flanagan sat as a member of the MASN broadcast team.

· Prior to tonight’s game, the club will have a moment of silence in Flanagan’s memory, and his uniform number 46 will be posted on the out-of-town scoreboard in right field from the time the gates open through the conclusion of the game.

· A video tribute will be played on the Oriole Park video board at the completion of the first inning of the game.

· The Orioles flag on the right field flag court at Camden Yards will be flown at half staff for each of the remaining home games this season.

· The Orioles have set up a virtual guestbook at www.oriolesguestbook.mlblogs.com or at www.orioles.com/flanny and invite fans to share their condolences and memories of Flanagan.
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Posted on: August 26, 2011 9:48 am
Edited on: August 26, 2011 9:56 am
 

Pepper: Penny the language enforcer



By Matt Snyder


In Thursday's Pepper, we passed along the story of Tigers pitcher Brad Penny yelling at Rays' infielder Sean Rodriguez while he ran hard after an infield popup. Rays manager Joe Maddon -- the most popular manager there is -- was furious after the game, believing Penny took issue with Rodriguez's hustle. I thought it was pretty ridiculous myself.

But Penny wanted to clarify things, obviously having heard the story spread a bit. He actually says he took issue with Rodriguez "screaming and cussing" in anger after having popped up.

"To me, that's a sign of disrespect if you're screaming that loud," Penny said (TampaBay.com). "All these kids can hear you, it's not too loud in here. So to me, that's not really professional."

Penny also noted he was disappointed anyone thought he didn't like hustle, saying he loves hustle and would be mad if players did not hustle.

It's hard to take issue with Penny trying to keep the ears of youngsters in Tampa Bay clean, but it's a bit odd to start yelling at an opposing player for it. As far as I could find via Google, this has never happened with Penny before. He's faced 7,819 batters in his career, so it's hard to believe an opposing batter has never cussed in frustration before. What about teammates of Penny over the years? Also, Penny currently plays for Jim Leyland -- have you ever read his lips when he's getting tossed from a game?

Again, I don't find fault with Penny wanting to prevent kids from hearing what is, frankly, going on in every single baseball game of the season. It just seems a bit odd that "watch your mouth" would ever be part of a major-league baseball game. As a parent, I'd like to express that it's my job to teach my children about inappropriate language and be their role model, not Penny's.

Berkman wants to come back: Cardinals outfielder Lance Berkman is enjoying a resurgent season for the Cardinals and he told reporters this week he wants to remain in St. Louis, if they'll have him. He said staying was his "first choice." (MLB.com)

#4TRUTH: That hashtag is what jailed ex-MLB player Lenny Dykstra uses on Twitter after most of his tweets. It's seemingly to help promote that he's innocent in the multiple crimes for which he's been charged. Add another to the list, because he's now being charged with indecent exposure (Associated Press). He would allegedly place ads online for housekeepers or personal assistants and would expose himself to responders.

So long, Jim Hendry Way: It's been a rough six weeks for Jim Hendry. Not only did he lose his job and have to act like he still had it for nearly a month, but now he's losing his street in Park Ridge -- where he lives. A portion of Northwest Highway was renamed Honorary Jim Hendry Way back in 2009, but now it's being changed back. Apparently, former Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich forced the name and the town never wanted it in the first place. Now that Blago is headed for the slammer, the sign is coming down. To rub salt in the wound, check out this quote: "Of course, if he had brought us a World Series, I would have built a monument to him at the intersection. But, alas, all he brought us was Alfonso Soriano and Carlos Zambrano," mayor Dave Schmidt joked in an email (ChicagoTribune.com). Zing!

Crafty lefties: In honor of the recently-deceased Mike Flanagan, Joe Posnanski came up with a Crafty Lefty Hall of Fame. Pretty cool stuff, as usual, from Joe.

25 things you didn't know: Yahoo's Jeff Passan compiled a really interesting list of 25 things we didn't know about baseball. For example, Michael Young and Howie Kendrick haven't popped out all season, Jonny Venters gets the highest percentage of grounders in a decade and Brett Gardner is the best defensive player in baseball.

Add another name to the list: Thursday, I presented several rumored names on the Cubs' wish list to be the next general manager. We can add Dan Evans to the list, as the Chicago Sun-Times makes a good case for him. Evans is a Chicago native who grew up near Wrigley Field. He was an assistant general manager for the White Sox and then the Dodgers GM before the McCourt family took over and got rid of him. Evans was at the helm when Matt Kemp, Russell Martin, Chad Billingsley and Jonathan Broxton were drafted.

Futility: Twins catcher Drew Butera has a chance to do something pretty remarkably bad. He's hitting .160 with 200 plate appearances. Since 1975, no player in the majors has hit .160 or worse with at least 250 plate appearances. (Hardball Talk)

88's the goal: Blue Jays manager John Farrell wants to reach 88 wins this season. The significance is that it would tie the 1998 mark for the most wins since the Jays won the World Series in 1993 (MLB.com). That won't get them anywhere near the playoffs, but would an 88-74 record be enough for the haters to stop saying Jose Bautista plays for a "loser?" (See comments)

Happy Day-versary: 10,000 days ago, Jack Morris threw a no-hitter and Dwight Gooden made his major-league debut. (Hardball Times)

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: August 25, 2011 12:59 pm
Edited on: August 25, 2011 1:32 pm
 

Report: Flanagan died from self-inflicted gunshot

By Matt Snyder

Former Orioles pitcher Mike Flanagan was found dead Wednesday and several outlets reported it was an apparent suicide by the 59 year old. Thursday, the Baltimore Sun is reporting Flanagan took his own life with a self-inflicted gunshot. Authorities reportedly received a 911 call at 4:26 p.m. ET Wednesday to report a death. Police officers then found Flanagan's body on a trail that lead to a barn on his property. The report also indicated the wound was to Flanagan's face, so it was initally difficult for police to identify the body as Flanagan's.

"It is with deep sadness that I learned of the death of my friend Mike Flanagan earlier this evening," Orioles owner Peter Angelos said in a statement released by the team Wednesday night. "In over a quarter century with the organization, Flanny became an integral part of the Orioles family, for his accomplishments both on and off the field. His loss will be felt deeply and profoundly by all of us with the ballclub and by Orioles fans everywhere who admired him. On behalf of the club I extend my condolences to his wife, Alex; and daughters Kerry, Kathryn and Kendall."

Flanagan won the Cy Young Award in 1979 -- when he went 23-9 with a 3.08 ERA -- and was a member of the Orioles' 1983 World Series championship team. In parts of 18 seasons, Flanagan went 167-143 with a 3.90 ERA. He also pitched for the Blue Jays from 1987-90.

Flanagan also spent time as a member of the team's broadcast crew and in the team's front office.

"It's just shock right now," former Orioles catcher Rick Dempsey told the Baltimore Sun. "I know everybody that played with him loved him to death. He was the backbone of that pitching staff. He never quit — this guy never quit. He was there for the duration. We had so many great games and so many great times. I just can't believe it."

"I am so sorry to hear about Mike's passing," Cal Ripken, Jr. said in a statement. "He was a good friend and teammate and our thoughts are with Alex and his family. Mike was an Oriole through and through and he will be sorely missed by family, friends and fans. This is a sad day."

Finally, the Flanagan family has issued a statement through the Orioles' front office (via Orioles Insider):

"We thank you for your support and kind words at this difficult time. Thank you for respecting our privacy as we grieve. A private memorial will be held at a later date."

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: August 24, 2011 9:57 pm
Edited on: August 25, 2011 2:49 am
 

Former Oriole Mike Flanagan found dead

Mike FlanaganBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Former Baltimore Orioles pitcher Mike Flanagan was found dead at his home, the team announced Wednesday, with two local outlets -- WBAL-TV and WNST.net -- reporting that the 1979 AL Cy Young Award winner took his own life.

Flanagan served in the team's front office from 2002-08 and was also a member of the team's broadcast crew. Flanagan was found dead on his property near his home in Maryland.

"It is with deep sadness that I learned of the death of my friend Mike Flanagan earlier this evening," Orioles owner Peter Angelos said in a statement released by the team. "In over a quarter century with the organization, Flanny became an integral part of the Orioles family, for his accomplishments both on and off the field. His loss will be felt deeply and profoundly by all of us with the ballclub and by Orioles fans everywhere who admired him. On behalf of the club I extend my condolences to his wife, Alex; and daughters Kerry, Kathryn and Kendall."

The Baltimore Sun reported that a body had been reported on Flanagan's property on Wednesday afternoon, but a police spokeswoman did not confirm the identity of the body, but did say police had not spoken to Flanagan.

Flanagan, 59, won the Cy Young Award in 1979 and was a member of the Orioles' 1983 World Series championship team. In parts of 18 seasons, Flanagan went 167-143 with a 3.90 ERA. He also pitched for the Blue Jays from 1987-90. In 1979 he went 23-9 with a 3.08 ERA to win the award as the American League's top pitcher.

Flanagan also spent time as a member of the team's broadcast crew and in the team's front office.

"It's just shock right now," former Orioles catcher Rick Dempsey told the Baltimore Sun. "I know everybody that played with him loved him to death. He was the backbone of that pitching staff. He never quit — this guy never quit. He was there for the duration. We had so many great games and so many great times. I just can't believe it." 

Orioles pitcher Jeremy Guthrie, who wears the same number Flanagan wore in Baltimore (46), tweeted after he picked up the win against the Twins on Wednesday:

 

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com