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Tag:Pedro Martinez
Posted on: January 9, 2012 3:03 pm
Edited on: January 9, 2012 3:23 pm
 

Years 2014-16 will crowd Hall of Fame ballot



By Matt Snyder


With the 2012 Hall of Fame class set to be Barry Larkin and Ron Santo, we can now look ahead to future years -- while kicking and screaming about who should have gotten in or who didn't deserve it, of course; heaven forbid anyone just celebrate the careers of Larkin and Santo and move on. My colleague C. Trent Rosecrans has taken a look at the explosive 2013 Hall of Fame class of first-year eligibles. Just envision all the arguing and name-calling that will take place in our comments section next year at this time (remember, everyone's personal opinion is right and everyone else is an idiot with absolutely no room for discussion!). I have a headache already.

Anyway, the ballot doesn't let up anytime soon, either. Check out the first-year eligible classes for the ensuing three ballots. And remember, these guys are only joining those remaining on the ballot. It's going to get overly crowded with legitimate superstars unless a few classes have upwards of four or five inductees.

Here are the most notable guys joining the ballot before 2017, divided up by year.

2014

Greg Maddux - Listing his numbers is a waste of time. He's as much of a lock as anyone.

Frank Thomas - It's also hard to see the Big Hurt not getting in on the first try as well. He has more than 500 home runs, two MVPs, and a ridiculous .974 career OPS (156 OPS-plus).

Hall of Fame coverage
Tom Glavine - Are 300 wins good for automatic induction? I think so. The two Cy Youngs and six top three finishes in Cy voting also help to make him a lock.

Jeff Kent - While not a very good defender, Kent was one of the best offensive second basemen in history. His 377 home runs are the most ever for a 2B while his .290/.356/.500 line is stellar from that position. Kent's WAR is very similar to Ryne Sandberg's, and Ryno got in on his third try. It might be tougher for Kent, with the crowded ballots and all. Think about it, are the voters really going to put in four first-year guys here? Very doubtful, especially considering there will be worthy guys lingering from previous ballots.

Mike Mussina - Moose went 270-153 in his career with an assortment of Gold Gloves, All-Star appearances and top six finishes in Cy Young voting. His 3.68 career ERA came in a time when it was a hitters' game, as it factors out to a 123 ERA-plus. Will his shortfall in wins (30 shy of 300) and strikeouts (187 short of 3,000) cost him? It very well might.

Luis Gonzalez - He was just a pretty good player until getting to Arizona, so he probably didn't do it long enough.

Moises Alou - He actually has better rate stats than Gonzalez, but the feeling is neither makes it.

2015

Randy Johnson - The only question is Mariners or Diamondbacks cap on his bust. I'll lean toward D-Backs with the four Cy Youngs and World Series ring, but he pitched 1 1/2 more seasons in Seattle. But this is a discussion for a different day.

Pedro Martinez - He was the most dominant pitcher in baseball for a seven-year stretch. He won three Cy Young awards and had the best MLB ERA in five of those aforementioned seven seasons. In all, Pedro was 219-100 with a 2.93 ERA, 1.05 WHIP and over 3,000 strikeouts in a big-time hitters' era. He has to be in, probably on the first ballot.

John Smoltz - How heavily will the 213 wins and 154 saves weigh on the minds of voters? I'm guessing a good amount. He also has that Cy Young and over 3,000 strikeouts. Even if not on the first ballot, Smoltz will be enshrined.

Gary Sheffield - One of the more feared hitters of his generation, Sheffield's offensive numbers say he's worthy (509 homers, .907 career OPS, over 1,600 runs and RBI). But he was in the Mitchell Report, so -- judging from what we've seen so far from the voters in terms of the steroid-connected guys -- he's probably not going to get in.

Nomar Garciaparra - Through 2003, he was headed to Cooperstown, but things derailed after that. His career triple slash line (.313/.361/.521) is pretty damn good, but was he dominant long enough? I'll guess no.

Carlos Delgado - With tons of power in his prime, Delgado ended up with 473 homers and 1,512 RBI. His .383 on-base percentage and .929 OPS (138 OPS-plus) are very impressive, too. My guess, though, is Delgado put up those numbers in the wrong era and he falls short.

2016

Ken Griffey Jr. - Easy choice.

Trevor Hoffman - The Hall voters haven't been kind to closers, but Hoffman saved 601 games, obliterating the previous record (held by Lee Smith) until Mariano Rivera passed him last season. I bet Hoffman gets in with relative ease. If not the first try, certainly the second or third.

Billy Wagner - See the above comment about Hall voters' treatment of closers. Wagner was definitely dominant, but I feel like only Rivera and Hoffman get in from this generation of closers.

Andy Pettitte - If you only look at the regular season stats, Pettitte has a case as a very good pitcher who wasn't a Hall of Famer. He went 240-138 with a 3.88 ERA, 1.36 WHIP and 2,251 strikeouts. He garnered Cy Young votes in five different seasons but never won the award. However, will 75 percent of the voters consider the postseason and cast a vote for Pettitte? It's possible. He was 19-10 with a 3.83 ERA in the postseason, in a whopping 263 innings. He has five rings and went to the World Series three other times (once with the Astros, remember). He will not be getting into the Hall on his first handful of tries, but maybe after a decade or so on the ballot Pettitte makes it. Then again, he also was named in the Mitchell Report.

Jim Edmonds - The four-time All-Star won eight Gold Gloves and hit 393 homers. He hit .284/.376/.527 and racked up 67.9 WAR according to Baseball-Reference.com. Still, with less than 2,000 hits, less than 400 home runs and less than 1,300 runs or RBI, I'd bet he doesn't have a real shot of making it.



So there you have it. Without considering the guys who were already on the ballot from previous years and then factoring in the huge class of 2013, we have three years with what I think will yield nine Hall of Famers. Maybe 10 if Pettitte gets enough support. Now, keep in mind I'm not a voter nor was I saying above who I would personally want to see in the Hall. I'm merely trying to guess how the voting body will react to the players above, based upon how they've treated players in the recent past.

Simply put, the ballot is going to be very, very crowded in a few years.

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Posted on: December 3, 2011 9:38 pm
Edited on: December 5, 2011 12:58 am
 

Pedro Martinez to officially retire



By C. Trent Rosecrans

Pedro Martinez told reporters Saturday that he was planning to officially announce his retirement soon -- apparently that announcement was unofficial.

The 40-year-old Martinez last pitched in 2009, starting nine regular-season games for the Phillies and three games in the postseason, including two in the 2009 World Series against the Yankees

According to MLB.com, Martinez said he still had the desire to play, but he's enjoying his life at home too much. 

Martinez will finish his career with a 219-100 record and 2.93 ERA and three Cy Young Awards. From 1997-2005, he went 149-53 with a 2.47 ERA, winning 20 games twice. He led the league in ERA five times, including a 1.90 ERA with the Expos in 1997 and a 1.74 ERA with the Red Sox in 2000. He finished second in the MVP voting in 1999 when he went 23-4 with a 2.07 ERA.

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Posted on: August 24, 2011 3:52 pm
Edited on: August 24, 2011 4:00 pm
 

Should a pitcher be eligible for the MVP?

Halladay

By Evan Brunell


Here's an easy question: Who are the MVPs in the AL and NL?

Not so easy, right?

There are plenty of candidates for the award, players you've certainly heard of before. Jose Bautista, Curtis Granderson, Jacoby Ellsbury in the AL. Ryan Braun, Matt Kemp, Prince Fielder in the NL. All good players.

All position players.

What about pitchers? Justin Verlander is having a sublime season for the Tigers. Roy Halladay is nailing down his reputation as one of the best pitchers to ever take the mound. Yet, pitchers are rarely considered for the MVP award, with the last victor coming in 1992 with Dennis Eckersley. The closest since was Pedro Martinez in 1999, when he lost out to Ivan Rodriguez because two sportswriters left Martinez off their ballot completely. Never mind that one of the sportswriters, George King of the New York Post, had Rick Helling and David Wells on the ballot the year before. (In fortuitous timing, Marc Normandin of SB Nation wrote Wednesday about Martinez and how Halladay and Verlander will have an uphill battle if Martinez couldn't even win the MVP.)

"It really made [writers] all look very dumb," Buster Olney, who covered the Yankees for the New York Times at the time, told Baseball Digest. "People were operating under different rules. The question of eligibility is a very basic thing. People were determining eligibility for themselves."

1999 is a long time ago, but Olney's sentiments could be repeated today. Voting for the MVP is a mess, as everyone comes to it with their own preconceived notion of who qualifies for the MVP award, and one of the bigger touchstones of the argument is whether a pitcher should be eligible. For the purposes of this discussion, we're not going to debate the merits of Verlander as opposed to Jose Bautista, or even to Jered Weaver. What we want to learn here is if pitchers should be on the MVP ballot, and if so, how important they should be weighted.

Taken straight from the actual MVP ballot, as was e-mailed to C. Trent Rosecrans when he voted for the NL MVP in 2010, are the following guidelines:
1. Actual value of a player to his team, that is, strength of offense and defense.
2. Number of games played.
3. General character, disposition, loyalty and effort.
4. Former winners are eligible.
5. Members of the committee may vote for more than one member of a team.

Keep in mind that all players are eligible for MVP, including pitchers and designated hitters.
While the latter three points are irrelevant to the debate, we immediately run into an issue to start. The first guideline is that the value of a player on offense and defense need to be considered when voting, which would seem to exclude pitchers, even though the ballot takes care to mention that pitchers are included. Where the heck is the pitcher supposed to contribute? One could argue that a pitcher's value can be considered part of defense. I polled several colleagues of mine in baseball, the vast majority contending that a pitcher's value should be considered part of defense. Take the definition of defense a step further, and the inclusion of pitchers becomes clear: "defense" can really be thought of as "run prevention," which is the primary (and really, only) job of a pitcher.

So a pitcher counts, even if he might be dinged for his lack of offense.

What about the next point, though? "Number of games played."

Most starting pitchers are lucky to get to 33 games started. That's just 20 percent of the entire season's 162 games. Relievers play in far more games, but even then, the percentage isn't anything to get worked up about. Dennis Eckersley, the last pitcher to win a Cy Young Award and did so as a closer, appeared in 65 games, or 40 percent of the entire season. That percentage would plummet below starting pitchers if you changed the scaling to total innings in a season, not games, so no matter what, a pitcher is not even close to being responsible for half the team's games.

That's a pretty damning guideline against pitchers, but guidelines are just that -- guidelines. If a pitcher is extraordinarily valuable to his team, that should outweigh the amount of games he's appeared in, especially given precedent has already been established with 20 pitchers winning the award. Those who want to adhere to the guideline strictly are welcome to do just that and ding pitchers for their contributions in that department, but it should not by any means prevent a truly great pitcher from snagging the award.

Take Roy Halladay, for example. He's a starting pitcher who has appeared in 26 games to date, yet he outpaces everyone else in the NL in Wins Above Replacement (Fangraphs version). Halladay's 6.9 WAR stands above Shane Victorino and Justin Upton's 6.2, with Upton playing in 128 games, or almost five times as many games as Halladay. Yet, it's hard to argue against Halladay having been the most valuable player in the NL, and he's a pitcher. Can you really hold games played against Halladay? No, you can't.

But should we really be comparing games played? Isn't a better way to compare hitters and pitchers to look at plate appearances? After all, if someone pinch-hit in all 162 games and received exactly one plate appearance per game and registered a hit in each one, his batting average would be 1.000... and yet, not qualify for the batting title. And this is someone that, by the guidelines of games played, should be considered over a pitcher.

Looking at plate appearances, last year's NL MVP award winner in Joey Votto walked to the plate 648 times. How many batters did Halladay, the 2010 NL Cy Young Award victor, face? That would be 993, or 53 percent more times Halladay faced a batter at the plate than Votto walked to the plate.

Aside from the guidelines, the most popular argument against pitchers winning the MVP centers around pitchers having their own honor in the Cy Young Award, and it makes sense that people would treat the MVP and Cy Young as two separate awards for two separate pools of talent. But that's just not the case. The MVP award is open to all players, pitchers included. You want an award just for hitters? Feast your eyes on the Hank Aaron Award, given annually to the best hitter (so defense doesn't count). The award isn't well-known, perhaps due to the award only starting in 1999, or because it's not part of the awards that the Baseball Writers Association of America gives out (the Cy Young Award and MVP award are part of the BBWAA's domain), but it's there. Hitters are not being penalized by having to share the MVP with pitchers.

The debate on whether or not pitchers should win the MVP contributed to robbing Pedro Martinez of his rightful award in 1999. Let's not make the same mistake in 2011.

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Posted on: April 9, 2011 6:58 pm
 

Pedro Martinez awaiting call to return to majors

By Evan Brunell

MartinezPedro Martinez is still hoping to pitch in 2011 despite not having pitched since losing Game 6 of the 2009 World Series for the Phillies, reports the New York Times.

Martinez, who is most known for his time as a Red Sox, is looking to sign with a team with playoff aspirations and believes he could be ready inside two months.

"I’m in shape right now and I’m training and I’m playing catch, so getting to full strength would probably take me a month, month and a half, to be on a mound," Martinez said, although he cites his family as a reason why he wouldn't want to come back. "The more time I spend away from the game, the more attached I get to my family. Apart from that, it would probably be just the hassle of having to travel so much and being away from them. It’s what makes it more difficult for us."

For now, Martinez is content training and working on his foundation while awaiting a call, if it ever comes.

"I’ve ... been doing a little bit of fishing and spending time with my family, of course. I fish most of the time in Miami and the Dominican -- that’s where we spend the most time. When I see myself free completely, I’m fishing. If I’m not, I’m training or dealing with the foundation," Martinez added.

Pedro says if he had to pick a team to return to, it would be the Red Sox.

"I would like to win a World Series in the National League, so the Phillies are in there, too. But for the time I’m going to be playing, I think Boston is more suitable so that I can retire with the Boston Red Sox and go to the Hall of Fame with the same hat," Petey said. While he's likely to go in with a Boston hat regardless of where he plays this year, it doesn't hurt that the Red Sox are Pedro's pick to represent the AL in the World Series even though he believes the victor will be Philadelphia. Plus, Philly has one of Pedro's favorite pitchers to watch.

"I would love to see a matchup between Ubaldo Jimenez and Roy Halladay," Martinez said. "That would be a dream matchup. I know it can be stressful for some of us to be facing top-notch pitchers, but that’s the way I liked it throughout my career. I liked big pitchers, the big time and big games, and I’m pretty sure they feel the same way."

It's tough to see Martinez returning to the game after such a layoff, but not impossible. While he certainly envisions himself as a starter, is it possible he could succeed as a reliever? Perhaps the greatest pitcher in the history of the game, Pedro just doesn't have the endurance to go deep into games with wicked stuff anymore. Limiting himself to an inning or two at a time may allow him to pitch with more max effort per pitch and make him that much more effective.

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Posted on: January 14, 2011 2:29 pm
 

Pedro Martinez undecided about pitching again

MartinezPedro Martinez hasn't pitched since losing Game 6 of the 2009 World Series to the Yankees, but the baseball great is considering a comeback tour in 2011.

"I don’t know really," Martinez told the Boston Herald about playing. "I could probably play if I wanted to, I just haven’t decided yet."

Martinez, who is opening a youth academy in his native Dominican Republic, has been running to stay in shape but has not done baseball-specific workouts. Once the academy is launched on Monday, he will begin strength and conditioning exercises and then make a decision. But it won't be his body that makes the call -- rather his mind.

"My body, thank God, is OK and I’m feeling good," said Martinez. "Now, it’s a matter of getting my mind going, to see if I want to play, and that’s probably the toughest part yet. It’s a big decision and I don’t want to screw it up."

If Martinez does return, he would want it to be as a starting pitcher, although he appears open to relieving. He has not relieved extensively since 1993, when he appeared in 63 games out of the bullpen. 

"I’ll do as I’m told but so far, I’ve proven I can be a starting pitcher," Martinez said. "If I decide to play baseball, if I have a chance to play baseball again, it really doesn’t matter. But I’m a starter."

-- Evan Brunell

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Category: MLB
Posted on: December 15, 2010 12:09 pm
 

Another Phils rotation option: Pedro?

Pedro Martinez Why stop with two Cy Young Award winners in your rotation when you can have three?

According to the New York Daily News, Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. inquired about Padro Martinez during last week's Winter Meetings. Martinez, 39, didn't play in 2010 but is not retired. He last pitched for the Phillies in 2009, joining the team late in the season and pitching alongside Cliff Lee in the Phillies' World Series run.

Asked earlier this month about whether he wants to pitch next season, Martinez told the Daily News, "I'll have to try it again. [Pitching] runs through my veins. When I saw Lee pitching this World Series and I had a chance to go to Texas for the remainder of the season, it really ticked me, but I was able to control it."

The Phillies are apparently ready to move fifth starter Joe Blanton, which could open a spot for Martinez to return with an incentive-heavy contract. That would give them this rotation: Roy Halladay (two Cy Youngs), Lee (one Cy Young), Roy Oswalt, Cole Hamels and Martinez (three Cy Youngs). Yikes.

-- David Andriesen

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Posted on: October 28, 2010 9:37 pm
 

Pedro pondering return?

Pedro Martinez
It's a long way from working out with a winter league team to playing in the majors, but even the thought of seeing Pedro Martinez back on a mound is intriguing.

The 39-year-old, who didn't play this season but hasn't retired, has started training with the Licey Tigers in the Dominican Republic, according to the Associated Press. He is trying to decide whether to join the team.

The three-time Cy Young winner (pictured making some sort of ... shaving appearance in New York this summer) struggled in his last full season with the Mets in 2008, putting up a 5.61 ERA that was more than two and a half points higher than his career average.

It looked like he was done, but then he came back and played a successful half season with the Phillies in 2009, going 5-1 with a 3.63 ERA and starting two World Series games. There had been talk of the Phillies again signing him for a late-season run this year, but he said he wanted to stay home in the Dominican with his family. He did not, however, rule out pitching in 2011.

If he has a good experience this winter and wants to pitch in the U.S. next year, would somebody sign a guy who was almost 40 and had missed a season? For most people, no. For a guy who was arguably the best pitcher of his generation, definitely.

-- David Andriesen

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Category: MLB
Posted on: July 21, 2010 5:26 pm
 

Pedro won't pitch in 2010, but maybe in '11

Brett Favre Watch 2010 is ongoing, but at least Pedro Martinez Watch is wrapped up for the year.

The 38-year-old pitcher has decided not to return to the majors this season, reports the Boston Herald. Last July he came back and signed with Philadelphia, going 5-1 with a 3.63 in nine starts down the stretch and making two World Series starts for the Phillies.

A source close to Martinez, an eight-time All-Star and three-time Cy Young Award winner, told the Herald that the pitcher is enjoying time with his family in the Dominican Republic. However, Martinez is apparently "wide open" about pitching in 2011.

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Category: MLB
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com