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Tag:Ron Santo
Posted on: January 2, 2012 12:45 pm
Edited on: January 2, 2012 1:18 pm
 

Getting to know the 2012 Hall of Fame candidates

By Matt Snyder

One week from today we will learn who -- if anyone -- will join Ron Santo in the 2012 Baseball Hall of Fame class. The Baseball Writers Association of America votes have all been mailed in, as a Dec. 31st or earlier postmark is required. Everyone who has been a member of the BBWAA for at least 10 years has a chance to vote. Players receiving 75 percent of the vote will be inducted.

Here's a complete look, in alphabetical order, at who the BBWAA voters were given to consider:

Jeff Bagwell -- He won the Rookie of the Year in 1991 and the MVP in 1994. The four-time All-Star garnered MVP votes in 10 of his 15 seasons. He ended his career with more than 1,500 runs and RBI while hitting 449 homers. His .948 OPS is outstanding, resulting in an OPS-plus of 149. Bagwell received 41.7 percent of the vote last season, his first on the ballot.

Jeromy Burnitz -- The one-time All-Star received MVP votes three times. He hit 315 home runs with an .826 career OPS.

Vinny Castilla -- A two-time All-Star and three-time Silver Slugger, Castilla hit 320 home runs and drove home 1,105 runs in his 16-year career. He hit at least 40 homers three straight seasons, 1996-98.

Juan Gonzalez -- Juan Gone is one of the few players in major-league history to win two MVP awards, as he took home the honors in both 1996 and 1998. He finished in the top 10 of MVP voting three other seasons. He finished with 434 home runs and 1,404 RBI, having accrued at least 35 homers and 100 RBI in seven of his 17 seasons.

Brian Jordan -- The former NFL player hit .282 during his 15-year career, making the All-Star team in 1999. He was also a very good defensive outfielder.

Barry Larkin -- The 12-time All-Star is the most likely player to be inducted this year. He received 62.1 percent of the vote last year and doesn't really face any stiff competition from first-timers this year. He won one MVP, three Gold Gloves and nine Silver Sluggers. He also stole 379 bases while hitting 198 homers, 441 doubles and 76 triples.

Javy Lopez -- The long-time Braves catcher hit 260 home runs in his 15-year career, making three All-Star teams. He finished fifth in MVP voting and garnered a Silver Slugger after his 2003 season, in which he hit 43 homers and drove in 109 runs.

Edgar Martinez -- The seven-time All-Star is one of the greatest designated hitters of all-time. He hit .312 with a .418 OBP and .515 slugging throughout his career, all of which are outstanding. Martinez actually ranks 64th in baseball history with 66.9 offensive Wins Above Replacement (oWAR) and 34th all-time in OPS. His 514 doubles rank him 45th. But Martinez only received 32.9 percent of the vote last season, a step backward from the 36.2 percent he got in his first try. The issue is him not playing defense. We'll see how that shakes out in the coming years, but it's a huge stretch to believe he gets in this year.

Don Mattingly -- Donnie Baseball is just treading water, having received between 9.9 and 28.2 percent of the vote in his 11 years on the ballot. Longevity seems to be the issue, as he played just 14 seasons and was out of baseball by age 35. The six-time All-Star finished in the top seven of MVP voting four straight times and racked up 1,099 RBI and 1,007 runs, along with nine Gold Gloves.

Fred McGriff -- Did Crime Dog fall seven home runs short of induction? He hit 493 in his 19-year career and received only 17.9 percent of the vote last year. The five-time All-Star also racked up 1,550 RBI and a nice .886 OPS (good for a 134 OPS-plus).

Mark McGwire -- Twelve All-Star Games. One Rookie of the Year. A whopping 583 home runs. A staggering .982 OPS and 162 OPS-plus. Five top-10 MVP finishes. A World Series ring and a Gold Glove. And yet Big Mac hasn't been able to top the 23.7 percent barrier in Hall of Fame voting due to his connection to using performance-enhancing drugs during his career. The question here isn't anywhere close to performance. It's all about the performance-enhancement. If you believe he should be excluded, that's why. If you don't care about the use, you believe he should be inducted into the Hall. Period.

Jack Morris -- Morris has worked his way up to 53.5 percent of the vote as of last time around, his 12th on the ballot. Players only get 15 chances, so he's running out. Morris won 254 games and three World Series rings in his career. He finished in the top five of Cy Young voting five times and struck out 2,478 hitters. His 3.90 career ERA seems to be hurting him, though.

Bill Mueller -- Mueller won the batting title in 2003 and had a nice 11-year career.

Terry Mulholland -- He stuck around for 20 seasons, racking up over 2,500 innings pitched with 46 complete games and 10 shutouts. He was 124-142 with a 4.41 ERA.

Dale Murphy -- The seven-time All-Star and two-time MVP hit 398 homers and ended with an .815 OPS (121 OPS-plus). He also won five Gold Gloves and four Silver Sluggers. He hasn't been able to garner strong support with the BBWAA, though, as he had just 12.6 percent of the vote last season, his 13th on the ballot.

Phil Nevin -- The one-time All-Star hit 208 career home runs with an .814 OPS (114 OPS-plus) in his 12-year career.

Rafael Palmeiro -- Much like McGwire, Palmeiro's on-field numbers are surefire Hall material. It's not even a discussion. Unlike McGwire, however, Palmeiro failed a league-sanctioned drug test. He got only 11 percent of the vote last year.

Brad Radke -- In 12 seasons, Radke went 148-139 with a 4.22 ERA and 1.26 WHIP. He made the All-Star team in 1998.

Tim Raines -- Raines was a seven-time All-Star who hit .294 with a .385 OBP in his career. He compiled more than 2,500 hits and 1,500 runs in his 23-year career and ranks fifth all-time with 808 stolen bases. Several advanced stats loved Raines, as he ranked in the top 10 in his league in WAR seven times. Raines got 37.5 percent of the vote last season, the third straight season he's made a decent-sized jump in votes (he got 22.6 percent in 2009).

Tim Salmon -- The 1993 Rookie of the Year hit 299 homers in his 14-year career, netting MVP votes three times. He had an .884 OPS (128 OPS-plus).

Ruben Sierra -- In 20 seasons, Sierra racked up 2,152 hits, 306 homers and four All-Star appearances.

Lee Smith -- With 478 career saves, Smith was the all-time leader for a stretch, but both Trevor Hoffman and Mariano Rivera have breezed past him, into the 600s. Smith was a seven-time All-Star and had a career 3.03 ERA.

Alan Trammell -- My colleague Scott Miller made his case for Trammell.

Larry Walker -- A five-time All-Star, seven-time Gold Glover and the 1997 MVP, Walker hit .313 with a .965 OPS (140 OPS-plus) in his 17-year career. He ended with 383 homers and over 1,300 runs and RBI. He's in the top 100 ever in WAR and 16th of all-time in OPS. Did his 10 years in hitter-friendly Colorado hurt Walker with the voting? Looks like it. He only got 20.3 percent of the vote last year.

Bernie Williams -- Five All-Star games, four Gold Gloves and a career .297 batting average look good for the long-time Yankee center fielder. He hit 287 homers and scored over 1,300 runs to go with an .858 OPS (125 OPS-plus).

Tony Womack -- The one-time All-Star hit .273/.317/.356 in his 13-year career with 363 stolen bases.

Eric Young -- EY lasted 15 seasons, racking up 465 steals and 996 runs with a .359 OBP. He made one All-Star team.

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Posted on: December 5, 2011 11:17 am
Edited on: December 5, 2011 2:14 pm
 

Ron Santo elected to Hall of Fame

By Matt Snyder

DALLAS -- In a moment that has to be described as bittersweet to the Santo family and Cubs fans alike, former third baseman Ron Santo has been elected into the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame. He received 15 of 16 possible votes from the Golden Era Committee, comprised of Hall of Famers, executives and media members.

The announcement was made Monday morning at the MLB Winter Meetings.

Santo died at the age of 70 just over a year ago, which is what makes the moment bittersweet. Many felt Santo should have been a Hall of Famer years ago, and now he's been elected after his death.

In a 15-season career, Santo hit .277/.362/.464 with 342 home runs, 1,331 RBI, 1,138 runs and 365 doubles. He won five Gold Gloves, finished in the top 10 of MVP voting four times and was a nine-time All-Star.

The last time Santo was on the BBWAA ballot, he received just 43.1 percent of the vote. He needed 75 percent to be elected. He was then left out by failing to gain enough votes from the Veteran's Committee the following several years. This time around, the Golden Era Committee came through for Santo.

Members of the Golden Era Committee: Hank Aaron, Al Kaline, Ralph Kiner, Tommy Lasorda, Juan Marichal, Brooks Robinson, Don Sutton, Paul Beeston, Bill DeWitt, Roland Hemond, Gene Michael, Al Rosen, Dick Kaegel, Jack O'Connell Dave Van Dyck and Santo's former teammate, Billy Williams.

Santo was the only player on the ballot to be elected by the committee. The other players on the ballot were Gil Hodges, Minnie Minoso, Tony Oliva, Jim Kaat, Allie Reynolds and Luis Tiant. Executives Charlie Finley and Buzzie Bavasi were also on the ballot.

A candidate needed 12 of 16 votes to make the Hall of Fame. Kaat received 10 votes. Minoso and Hodges got nine, while Oliva received eight.

Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig issued the following statement:

“This is a great day for baseball and for Cubs fans everywhere. I am thrilled that the memory of my dear friend Ron Santo will be preserved forever in the halls of Cooperstown. As a star player and a beloved broadcaster, Ron was a staple of the Cubs’ experience every single day for decades, representing all the goodwill of both the franchise and the game he loved.

“I always admired Ron’s courage and loyalty, and I miss him very much. Today, I am so proud to know that his contributions to baseball will receive the highest honor. On behalf of Major League Baseball, I congratulate Ron’s wife Vicki, their four children and their grandchildren.”

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Posted on: November 3, 2011 11:22 am
 

Santo among Hall of Fame's Golden Era candidates

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Former Cubs third baseman Ron Santo is among eight former players and two former executives will be voted upon by the 16-member Golden Era Committee at the Winter Meetings and announced on Dec. 5.

On the list are Buzzie Bavasi, Ken Boyer, Charlie Finley, Gil Hodges, Jim Kaat, Minnie Minoso, Tony Oliva, Allie Reynolds and Luis Tiant.

The finalists are voted on by a 16-member board -- they are Hall of Famers Hank Aaron, Al Kaline, Ralph Kiner, Tommy Lasorda, Juan Marichal, Brooks Robinson, Don Sutton and Billy Williams; major league executives Paul Beeston (Blue Jays), Bill DeWitt (Cardinals), Rolan Hemond (Diamondbacks), Gene Michael (Yankees) and Al Rosen (retired); as well as media members Dick Kaegel (MLB.com), Jack O'Connell (BBWAA) and Dave Van Dyck (Chicago Tribune).

The Golden Era Committee currently uses a three-year cycle of consideration for managers, umpires, executives and long-retired players by era.

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Posted on: August 10, 2011 10:28 am
Edited on: August 10, 2011 10:28 am
 

Pepper: Where will Bubba Starling end up?

Starling

By Evan Brunell

TOUGH DECISION: Bubba Starling has a choice -- accept a hefty bonus and head to the minor leagues for a few years in the hope he can rise up the ladder and join the Royals. The hometown athlete was drafted by Kansas City in June but he has yet to sign with the deadline coming up on Monday. Starling has a tough decision to make -- join K.C. or head to the Nebraska Cornhuskers, where fame as a quarterback awaits.

“It’s a win-win situation,” Starling told the Kansas City Star.

Starling was at the University of Nebraska signing autographs and fans obviously were rooting for Starling to opt to join the Cornhuskers. The problem is, that's a lot of money for Starling to give up to play football, a sport that's more dangerous to overall long-term health.

“If it was my son, I’d probably tell him to play baseball,” fan Kevin Sullivan said. “But, you know, if he’s going to play Nebraska football …” (Kansas City Star)

BIZARRE INJURY
: There's always a few injuries each season that make you do a double-take. Chris Narveson was a victim of such an injury, slicing his thumb with scissors while trying to repair his glove. He required eight stitches and will miss his next start. (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel)

BACK TO SCHOOL: Zachary Houchins, the Nationals' 15th round pick, is heading back to college. “I haven’t had [contact with the Nationals] any since all that stuff happened,” Houchins said. “I’m set on going back to school. ... I’m happy with it. I’d love to go back there.”

Houchins is referring to epithets used to describe African-Americans, homosexuals and Chinese on his Twitter feed in June, since deleted. The Nationals were upset with his words, which Houchins admitted they had a right to be. Houchins added, though, that the comments weren't hateful and just part of how he and his friends (many African-American) talk.

“Honestly, in my eyes, there was no lesson to learn,” Houchins said. “It’s just what I said got blown out of proportion, and I paid the price for it.” (Washington Post)

CLUTCH: Matthew Leach runs through a list of players who have been clutch so far this season. The one thing that caught my eye is Asdrubal Cabrera's performance with the bases loaded -- a pristine 6 for 6. (MLB.com)

INJURY PROBLEMS: Paul Konerko's left calf strain has made lineup maneuverings tough for skipper Ozzie Guillen, and if the White Sox had gone into extra innings last night, would have done so without a DH when Konerko was pinch-run for by Brent Lillibridge, with Lillibridge moving to first for the ninth. (Chicago Tribune)

LYNN, TOO: Cardinals reliever Lance Lynn strained his left oblique in Tuesday's game and will hit the disabled list, depriving the team of one of its most dependable late-inning relievers. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

SURGERY: Reds shortstop Zack Cozart is likely to undergo surgery to repair a hyperextended left elbow, and would prefer to get it over with sooner rather than later. (Cincinnati.com)

LOPEZ ... HEPING? There's a piece up today about Felipe Lopez, who supposedly doing well in Milwaukee after coming over from Tampa Bay, starting nine of the last 10 games. How someone hitting .235/.289/.235 in 34 at-bats (which was conveniently omitted from the story) is doing well is not clear. (MLB.com)

LAST RING: Bengie Molina was at the Rangers game on Tuesday, collecting his AL championship ring -- the last ring Texas needed to hand out. He also threw out the first pitch and told his ex-teammates not to waste their strong season. (Ft. Worth Star-Telegram)

SANTO STATUE: The Cubs will unveil a statue of Ron Santo on Wednesday. In the article, an interesting tidbit: Kerry Wood only returned to the Cubs because he ran into GM Jim Hendry at Santo's funeral in December. (Chicago Tribune)

ILLEGAL BALLS: An independent baseball team, the Lake County Fielders, had a game suspended Friday night for claims that the team provided inferior baseballs to be used. These baseballs were not sanctioned for professional use, but were still brand new and purchased from a sporting goods store. In financial trouble, the team hadn't placed its order to Rawlings for the baseballs until it was too late, and umpires decided the baseballs weren't acceptable. League officials have since approved their usage. (DailyHerald.com)

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Posted on: March 10, 2011 4:16 pm
Edited on: March 10, 2011 5:50 pm
 

Cubs stage Ron Santo Day at HoHoKam Park

By Matt Snyder

Being March 10, the Chicago Cubs are honoring former great Ron Santo Thursday at their spring home. Players were given special hats with a No. 10 on them, a 10 emblem -- the same logo that will worn on the sleeves of Cubs' jerseys this season, pictured left on Darwin Barney's jersey -- is painted behind home plate and there will be ceremonies prior to the exhibition game honoring Santo.

The nine-time All-Star passed away this past offseason at the age of 70. While Santo was a fan favorite during his playing days, he had grown even more beloved in recent years as a color commentator for Cubs games on the radio. He made no bones about being a complete homer for the Cubs and wore his heart on his sleeve -- notably celebrating greatly the division championships and screaming "NOOOOOOO!" if something didn't go the Cubs way (like Brant Brown's dropped fly ball in 1998).

"I never needed to hear a score when I was in Iowa," Cubs manager Mike Quade told the Chicago Tribune . "Just turn the radio on after a game and listen to three words out of Ronnie's mouth, or three groans... I wasn't sure how bad we were losing, but I knew it wasn't good. And if he and Pat (Hughes) were having fun, then we were in good shape."

Interesting to note here, Major League Baseball didn't allow the Cubs to wear the hats with a "10" on them, because there was no MLB logo on them. Don't you always love with the professional sports leagues get so concerned about little things like this with the uniforms. It's one thing if it's a regular-season game -- because the "slippery slope" theory means you open yourself up to almost anything being acceptable -- but in spring training? C'mon. Who really cares?

Regardless, the day at HoHoKam Park was one die-hard Cubs fans would surely enjoy -- even if MLB had to step in and get strict.

UPDATE: More quotes from Cubs' family members at the event (via Chicago Tribune ):

"If you look in the dictionary and saw endurance and courage, the man, No. 10, Ron Santo, was right there," former teammate Fergie Jenkins said. "That's the kind of guy he was. The example he tried to prove on the field, as an individual, as a teammate, that was something that will never, never ever be forgotten. Ronnie was a great individual, a great friend."

"Ron Santo as a player was a pain in the fanny. But as he got out of the game of baseball and we got to know him a lot better, I absolutely loved the guy, and I told him every time I talked to him on the telephone or we played golf together that I loved him, and I still love him and I miss him very much," Randy Hundley added. "But I'm also glad that he does not have to suffer anymore with the bad legs he had."

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Category: MLB
Posted on: February 16, 2011 11:48 am
 

Moreland will take Santo's booth spot

The Cubs have announced that former outfielder Keith Moreland will succeed the late Ron Santo as radio analyst.

Moreland, 56, broadcasts for the University of Texas and has filled in for Santo in the past. He played 12 major-league seasons, six with the Cubs. In an interview earlier this winter, Moreland acknowledged that he'd like the job but that nobody will ever truly replace Santo.

"He's irreplaceable," Moreland said, according to the Chicago Tribune. "Yes, I'd love to warm the seat to sort of keep it in the (Cubs) family. It would be something. I've spent a long time over the last 20 years getting myself in a position to maybe broadcast full-time for a team. I've done the University of Texas for a long time and it's something I feel like I'm ready to do. I can't make those decisions. All I can be is Keith Moreland."

-- David Andriesen

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Category: MLB
Posted on: January 15, 2011 12:37 pm
 

Cubs plan Santo statue

Ron Santo
Cubs great Ron Santo will join elite company in August, becoming the fourth person honored with a statue at Wrigley Field. His likeness will join those of Ernie Banks, Harry Caray and Billy Williams.

Santo, who died December 3, played 14 years for the Cubs and spent 20 years in their broadcast booth. He also was known for his charitable efforts, raising more than $40 million for research on diabetes, with which he struggled all his life.

The Cubs also will wear a patch on their uniforms next season honoring Santo.

"Ron Santo will always be remembered as an extraordinary player, as the ultimate Cub fan and for his tireless commitment towards juvenile diabetes research," Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts said. "On behalf of the Cubs organization, we are proud to honor Ron Santo with a statue of his likeness at Wrigley Field, so that future generations can remember his remarkable legacy on and off the field."

The statue will be unveiled prior to an August 10 game against the Nationals.

-- David Andriesen

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Category: MLB
Tags: Cubs, Ron Santo
 
Posted on: December 17, 2010 9:37 pm
Edited on: December 17, 2010 9:37 pm
 

Santo's last gift to Cubs: Wood

Jim Hendry
Jim Hendry says Ron Santo kept giving to his beloved Cubs even after passing away. In a way, Santo brought Kerry Wood back to the North Side.

"God bless No. 10," Hendry, the Cubs' general manager, said of Santo. "In his own great way, he had something to do with this. It really wasn't on the radar for either one of us until last weekend."

Wood wanted to go back to the team where he spent his first 11 seasons, and Hendry wanted him back. According to the Chicago Tribune, Hendry hadn't approached the right-hander because he knew the Cubs couldn't afford the going rate for Wood and didn't want to insult him with a lowball offer.

But at last week's funeral for Santo, the Cubs great and long-time broadcaster, Hendry and Wood got to talking. At the end of the conversation, they were determined to find a way Wood could return to Chicago.

"Honestly, it probably wouldn't have come up," Wood said. "We just kind of saw each other."

Wood had three or four offers -- including a reported two-year, $10 million offer -- but came to the Cubs for a one-year, $1.5 million deal. According to Hendry, that would have made Santo very happy.

"Nobody loved Kerry Wood more than Ron Santo," he said.

-- David Andriesen

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com