Tag:Rubby de la Rosa
Posted on: October 9, 2011 1:36 pm
Edited on: October 10, 2011 3:53 pm
 

R.I.P.: 2011 Los Angeles Dodgers

By Matt Snyder

Another season gone, another disappointment for 29 teams as one is immortalized forever. Let’s take a look back at 2011 and forward in Eye on Baseball’s R.I.P. series...

Team name: Los Angeles Dodgers
Record: 82-79, third place in NL West, 11.5 games back
Manager: Don Mattingly
Best hitter: Matt Kemp -- .324/.399/.586, 39 HR, 126 RBI, 115 R, 40 SB
Best pitcher: Clayton Kershaw -- 21-5, 2.28 ERA, 0.98 WHIP, 248 K, 233 1/3 IP

2011 SEASON RECAP

The Dodgers were mediocre at best and pretty bad at times for most of the 2011 season, but all of a sudden, something seemed to click. After an August 21 loss, the Dodgers sat 57-69. The rest of the way, they went 25-10. Simply: For the last five weeks of the season, the Dodgers were one of the best teams in baseball. It's just that it was too late and not many noticed -- including Joe Buck, who said "a bad Dodgers team" during the ALCS telecast Saturday night.

On the field, this Dodgers season will be remembered for two reasons. More specifically, two players. Matt Kemp would have the NL MVP in the bag had his teammates played better all season. He may lose out to Ryan Braun, though, due to many voters believing the winner of the individual award has to come from a team that was in contention. Clayton Kershaw won the pitching triple crown (led the league in wins, ERA and strikeouts -- note: He tied Ian Kennedy in wins, but that still counts). He's the likely Cy Young Award winner in the NL.

Off the field, this Dodgers season has been completely and utterly marred by owner Frank McCourt. Unfortunately for the Dodgers, he's still the owner. At least as of this writing.

2012 AUDIT

R.I.P. series
Despite the strong close, the Dodgers are still in a state of limbo. There are several holes and the ownership mess makes it unknown as to how they can proceed. Fortunately, the nucleus is young and rather strong. Kenley Jansen and Javy Guerra make a strong back-end duo in the bullpen. Kershaw is an elite ace. Kemp is one of the best all-around players in baseball. Chad Billingsley is fickle, but he's still only 27. The youth movement showed promise for the future, too, with Dee Gordon, Jerry Sands and Rubby De La Rosa (who had Tommy John surgery in August) showing they can be part of the solution in L.A. On the other hand, decisions need to be made with James Loney, Andre Ethier, catcher, second base and third base.

The franchise is not set up to be a slam-dunk contender, nor is it set up for futility in the near future. If the ownership situation would get settled very soon and the Dodgers could be a major player in free agency, they'd have a great shot at winning the NL West in 2012. It's just that we don't know how long the ownership situation will linger. Even if McCourt lost the team today, however, the approval process wouldn't be complete until it was too late to make several major plays at the likes of Prince Fielder, Jose Reyes and C.J. Wilson.

FREE AGENTS

Rod Barajas, C
Jamey Carroll, 2B
Aaron Miles, 2B
Casey Blake, 3B (option declined)
Juan Rivera, OF
Jon Garland, SP (option declined)
Hiroki Kuroda, SP
Jonathan Broxton, RP
Mike MacDougal, RP
Vicente Padilla, RP

OFFSEASON FOCUS

Unfortunately for the Dodgers, they can't act like a large-market team as long as the McCourt financial stuff continues. And that won't be resolved this offseason. Still, there is significant payroll coming off the books. The general direction of the franchise should be to try and compete with the younger players while letting the aging veterans walk, but a few exceptions can be made -- because it's very realistic that the Dodgers can compete in the NL West in 2012.
  • They can probably make a run at Jose Reyes. His zealous personality would fit perfectly in Hollywood, just as his bat would atop the order. Gordon could be moved to second base and hit second. So the lineup would start: Reyes, Gordon, Kemp, Ethier (well, maybe, we'll get to that ... ).
  • Play Juan Uribe full time at third base. He's not too old to bounce back from an injury-plagued campaign.
  • Dangle Ethier as a trade candidate. Even when he's at his best, he's not an elite player -- yet many seem to view him as one. He's a free agent at the end of 2012 and has had several episodes of complaining about the team and then backing off the comments. I wouldn't necessarily come out and say he's gone, but instead quietly shop him. If he can be dealt for prospects, Sands and Tony Gwynn Jr. are enough to fill out the outfield for the time being, while L.A. just treads water waiting for the ownership situation to be sorted out.
  • Give Loney one last chance. The 27 year old was one of the best hitters in the league in the last five weeks. If it was a fluke, the Dodgers can address first base next season. If the McCourt situation was different, a run at Fielder or Albert Pujols while selling high Loney would make a lot of sense, but I just don't think they could pull that off financially at this point.
  • Bring Kuroda back for one more year. He wants to stay in L.A. anyway, and with De La Rosa on the shelf recovering from surgery, there's a need for a stop-gap in the rotation. 
  • If there's any possible way to do so financially, Kemp needs a huge contract extension. He's only 27 and can anchor the franchise for a long time. He's also wildly popular, so this would at least send a message to the fans that the Dodgers are still very relevant.
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Posted on: August 2, 2011 7:58 pm
 

Dodger rookie to undergo Tommy John surgery

Rubby De La RosaBy C. Trent Rosecrans

One of the few bright spots for the Dodgers this season was the emergence of rookie right-hander Rubby De La Rosa, a fireballing starter who was 4-5 with a 3.71 ERA and 60 strikeouts in 60 2/3 innings. So, in the spirit of 2011 for the Dodgers, there's bad news -- De La Rosa will have to undergo Tommy John surgery.

De La Rosa threw 103 pitches in four innings of Sunday's loss to the Diamondbacks and complained of a sharp pain in his elbow. An MRI on Monday revealed a partially torn ulnar collateral ligament, the team announced on Tuesday. 

De La Rosa told the Los Angeles Times he was scared about undergoing surgery.

"Yeah, a little bit," he told the paper. "I've never been operated on."

The good news is that most pitchers can return to form after Tommy John surgery, the bad news is that it takes on average a year to return and longer to regain their pre-surgery form. Luckily, at 22, De La Rosa has time -- and it's not like the Dodgers are going anywhere.

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Posted on: August 2, 2011 1:10 am
 

De La Rosa could miss rest of season

By Matt Snyder

Rookie starting pitcher Rubby De La Rosa was placed on the disabled list by the Dodgers Monday, and he may have thrown his last pitch of the season. The Dodgers announced that De La Rosa has a sprained ulnar-collateral ligament in his throwing elbow. The club passes along that he's "weighing options and determining course of treatment." Surgery is a possibility. The UCL surgery is commonly known as Tommy John surgery.

De La Rosa, 22, entered the season as a relatively highly-regarded prospect for the Dodgers and was promoted to the bigs in late May. He's shown flashes of his high upside while struggling with control at times. He is 4-5 with a 3.71 ERA and 1.40 WHIP in 60 2/3 innings.

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Posted on: July 9, 2011 6:52 pm
Edited on: July 9, 2011 8:29 pm
 

Padres lose no-hitter, game after 8.2 innings

Luke GregersonOh, so close for the Padres ... sort of.

San Diego entered Saturday as one of two major-league teams without a no-hitter in franchise history (Other club mentioned below).

And it's going to stay that way, thanks to the Dodgers' Juan Uribe doubling in the bottom of the ninth with two outs ... on a two-strike pitch.  

Who was the San Diego pitcher?

It was a combined effort. Reliever Luke Gregerson (pictured), who yielded Uribe's double, entered in the ninth. Aaron Harang started, pitching six innings (six K's, three walks), Josh Spence fanned the only batter he faced in the seventh, Chad Qualls closed the seventh and Mike Adams tossed the eighth.

However, had Gregerson retired Uribe, it would not have been an official no-hitter since the game was scoreless.

But that ended an at-bat later when Dioner Navarro plated Uribe with a walk-off single for a Dodgers 1-0 victory. 

But get this: The Dodgers held the Padres offense to just one hit, a Cameron Maybin fifth-inning single.

Rubby De La Rosa started for L.A., fanning eight with four walks and Maybin's hit over six frames. Matt Guerrier worked the seventh, Mike MacDougal the eighth and winning pitcher Blake Hawksworth the ninth.

As for the other major-league ballclub without a no-no, it's the New York Mets.

Click here for: Last no-hitters by Franchise


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Posted on: June 18, 2011 5:17 pm
Edited on: June 18, 2011 5:48 pm
 

On Deck: Scoreless streakers face off



By C. Trent Rosecrans
 

Paul MaholmCarlos CarrascoSomething has to give: Pittsburgh's Paul Maholm and Cleveland's Carlos Carrasco enter Saturday's matchup with scoreless innings streaks -- 15 1/3 for Carrasco and 13 for Maholm. Maholm hasn't allowed a run in three of his last four starts, including seven scoreless against the Mets on Monday and a shutout against the Cubs on May 28. Carrasco has been a good omen for the Indians during a rough streak, winning his last two starts as the team has struggled. He's won five of his last six starts, allowing two runs or fewer in four of those starts. Pirates at Indians, 7:05 p.m. ET (Follow live here)

Dan HarenHaren ready to hit: Much of the time when interleague play comes around, the thought of American League pitchers getting their chance at the plate is a joke. Maybe not so much for the Angels, as Dan Haren takes the mound -- and his spot in the lineup -- on Saturday at Citi Field in New York. When Haren was traded from the Diamondbacks to the A's last season, he was hitting .364/.375/.527 -- good for an OPS+ of 136, including a homer in 57 plate appearances. Oh, and he's also 6-4 with a 2.54 ERA this season. Haren's gone at least six innings in all of his starts, but has been burned by poor run support. Since improving to 4-0 on April 17, Haren has allowed two rearmed runs or fewer (going at least 6 2/3 innings each time) five times with just an 0-1 record to show for it. That's something Mets starter Mike Pelfrey can identify with. He's allowed two or fewer earned runs in four of his last six starts, going 0-1 in those games. Angels at Mets, 7:10 p.m. ET (Follow live here)

Rubby De La RosaWandy RodriguezRubby vs. Wandy: While most will remember Rubby De La Rosa and Wandy Rodriguez for their unusual first names, the two add up for a pretty strong pitching matchup. Rodriguez, the Astros' lefty, came off the disabled list on Monday to pitch six scoreless innings, allowing just two hits and four walks in a victory against Atlanta. The Dodgers rookie right-hander left his last outing after five innings with a forearm cramp, but still picked up the victory over the Rockies. In two starts, De La Rosa is 2-0 with a 3.60 ERA, striking out 10 and walking eight in 10 innings, while allowing seven hits and four earned runs. Astros at Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. ET (Follow live here)

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Posted on: May 30, 2011 11:20 pm
 

Who is the Dodgers' closer?



By C. Trent Rosecrans

Dodgers manager Don Mattingly was asked what appeared to be a pretty simple question before his team's game against the Rockies on Monday: Who is the Dodgers' closer?

"How do I know?" Mattingly answered, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Jonathan Broxton, Hong-Chih Kuo, Vicente Padilla and Kenley Jansen are all on the disabled list.

Matt Guerrier and Mike MacDougal both have saves this season, but Mattingly said he'd rather keep those two pitching in the middle innings -- and as a safety net if one of his younger relievers gets in trouble and have to leave in the middle of an inning.

That leaves him with Javy Guerra, Scott Elbert and Rubby De La Rosa as the choice to close. All three have recently been called up from the minors.Combined, the three have pitched 39 1/3 innings in the big leagues -- and 30 1/3 of those belong to the lefty Elbert, who appeared in 19 games for the Dodgers in 2009.

The three have pitched well enough in their limited appearances so far.

Elbert, 25, had given up just one hit and a walk, while striking out five in four scoreless innings before Monday, when he allowed a hit and a walk, but no runs or outs in his six-pitch outing. He was rescued by Guerrier, just as Mattingly said he wanted to do.

Guerra, 25, came into Monday's game having allowed four hits and two walks in six innings, allowing two runs, while walking two and striking out four. He earned a save last week against the Astros.

De La Rosa, 22, picked up the win in his last outing, Friday against the Marlins when he allowed a run on two hits in two innings of work. It was just the second outing of his career, having made his big-league debut three days earlier with a scoreless inning against the Astros. The hard-throwing right hander was 7-2 with a 2.37 ERA and six saves last season at Class A and Double-A.

Mattingly didn't need to tip his hand Monday, as the Dodgers led 7-1 going into the ninth, a non-save situation. However, Guerra finished out the game for Los Angeles, allowing two hits, but no runs, in his inning of work.

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Posted on: May 25, 2011 10:23 am
Edited on: May 25, 2011 10:52 am
 

Pepper: Mets on verge of accepting ownership bid

By Evan Brunell

SO THE TIME HAS COME FOR A NEW OWNER: OK, so technically a new Mets minority owner, but the move could have lasting implications.

Sources say that former commodities trader Ray Bartoszek and investor Anthony Lanza have been chosen as the preferred bidders for the available stake in the Mets' franchise. The new owners will have a say in the team's finances and path forward, as incumbent owner Fred Wilpon has promised. And if Wilpon is forced to sell the team -- a distinct possibility -- it's likely that Bartoszek and Lanza will emerge as the new owners.

It's unclear how much stake the new owners will receive, but the cost is expected to be around $200 million for up to a 49 percent stake and a deal is extremely close. First, though, negotiations on whether the minority group can purchase a small stake in SportsNet New York has to be ironed out, but could be the necessary final piece for the deal as 49 percent may not be justifiable enough for $200 million given the Mets' debt problems.

Bartoszek previously headed up oil trading for the world's biggest commodity trader, Glencore International, while Lanza is an owner of Carriage House Partners, a private equity firm. (New York Post)

100 PERCENT
: Unsurprisingly, Carlos Beltran disagrees with Fred Wilpon's comments that he's 65-to-70 percent. "I'm 100 percent," Beltran said. And he's playing like it. (Newsday)

FIGGINS SLOWLY IMPROVING
: Chone Figgins has been a shell of his former self since arriving in Seattle, but skipper Eric Wedge thinks things are getting better. "I feel like he's been a little bit more aggressive,'' Wedge said. "I feel like he's starting to make better contact. More firm." It's still way too early to think about Figgins finally delivering on his contract, but any step forward is positive. (Seattle Times)

STREAK SNAPPED
: CC Sabathia hurled a complete game victory Tuesday, coming away with the win. It was his first complete game win since May 8, 2009... and also the first Yankees complete-game winner since. That's the longest streak in AL history for a stretch in-between complete-game wins at 341 games. (New York Daily News)

NEW CLOSER
: Until Andrew Bailey returns, Grant Balfour will be the new closer in Oakland, replacing Brian Fuentes after the flap Fuentes created with his comments Tuesday. Too bad no one let Balfour know. (MLB.com)

ODDITY: Here's something interesting: Curtis Granderson has smacked 16 home runs and four triples, an impressive feat so far. But it's been all or nothing, as his four doubles pop out, a rare occurrence. After all, if you hit for power, you'll have your fair share of doubles. Granderson's doubles account for just one-sixth of his extra base hits, and only two other players in history have more extra-base hits than him with a similar 1/6 ratio of doubles: Mark McGwire in 2001 and Wes Covington in 1957. (Baseball Reference)

ONE MORE: Orioles starter Brian Matusz agrees that he needs one more rehab start, so will pitch for Triple-A on Friday. But after that, he's expected to push to return to the staff for a June 1 start, which will mark his season debut. (MASN Sports)

NEW DODGER: Top prospect Rubby De La Rosa received the call to the majors, surprising the Double-A starting pitcher, who will pitch in relief. While the Dodgers contend his future is in the rotation, de la Rosa was needed to shore up a bullpen besieged by injuries and ineffectiveness. De la Rosa has the talent to emerge as closer in L.A., and the team is still in the postseason hunt, so the promotion does make some sense. (Los Angeles Times)

YER OUTTA HERE! Ned Yost isn't going to get tossed from a game anytime soon -- unless he feels one of his players are being disrespected --  but that will change in coming years. "This is the time, with a young club, that you set the tone," Yost said. "I don't want these guys complaining and moaning. An umpire's call is an umpire's call and it doesn't get changed. It's doesn't do anybody any good to whine or cry about it. So, if I'm yelling, moaning and screaming on every call, naturally they're going to follow my lead. So it's important to me, right now, to accept the umpire's calls. ... But disrespect a player one time and I'm gone." Also in the link: Stories about how the Royals are trying to help those affected by the devastating Joplin, Mo. tornado. (MLB.com)

BRING IT IN: Is it time for the Padres to bring in the fences at Petco Park? Petco has become the anti-Coors Field, and even Coors is no longer an offensive haven thanks to the effects of the humidor. There appears to be a growing groundswell to fix Petco, and it would be as simple as moving the fences in. No one advocates making Petco a hitter's park, but moving the fences in would only even the playing field just a bit -- and that's all one needs. (Rob Neyer)

FIRST WIN: Alfredo Simon nailed his first win of the season thanks to an Adam Jones walk-off home run. A relieved Simon was thrilled after the game as it was his first win since last season. He has been dealing with a murder charge in his native country since the winter and still isn't out of the woods yet. (MASN Sports)

NEW GRIP: Dustin Moseley has been a nice piece of the Padres so far this year, but the righty can't sit on his laurels when there's more to be done. He tweaked his changeup, which earned positive results after Monday's game. (MLB.com)

PATROLLING THE OUTFIELD: Josh Hamilton believes he could start playing the outfield immediately but will be held back until this weekend, where he is expected to return to left field. Once he has several games under his belt, it's possible he could start seeing some time in center. (Ft. Worth Star-Telegram)

BACK TO ACTION: Johan Santana finally stepped back on a mound for the first time since last season and threw 25 pitches. Santana is progressing nicely in his return from surgery and could rejoin the Mets in July. If he pitches strong down the stretch, he could be dealt after the year. (ESPN New York)

A NEW LOU: Lou is back in Chicago, and we're talking Montanez. The former Cubs first-round pick 11 years ago took a detour in Baltimore for four years, but wound up back with the Cubs this season in Triple-A. He finally reached the majors with his original club when tapped yesterday to replace Marlon Byrd on the roster. Montanez made the most of it, notching a RBI double in his first Cubs at-bat. (Chicago Sun-Times)

ON HIS WAY BACK: John Lackey pitched in a bullpen session Tuesday and came through with flying colors, setting him up for a rehab game on May 31 and a return to the Red Sox for June 5's start against the Athletics. (Boston Globe)

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