Tag:Scott Baker
Posted on: September 20, 2011 1:09 pm
Edited on: September 20, 2011 2:41 pm
 

R.I.P.: 2011 Minnesota Twins

By Matt Snyder

Another season gone, another disappointment for 29 teams as one is immortalized forever. Let’s take a look back at 2011 and forward in Eye on Baseball’s R.I.P. series...

Team name: Minnesota Twins
Record: 59-93, 29.5 games back in AL Central
Manager: Ron Gardenhire
Best hitter: Michael Cuddyer -- .280/.347/.460, 19 HR, 68 RBI, 66 R, 27 2B, 11 SB
Best pitcher: Scott Baker -- 8-6, 3.21 ERA, 1.19 WHIP, 120 K, 131 2/3 IP

The 2011 season has to go down as one of the most disappointing in franchise history. The Twins had six division titles in the past decade, including 2009 and 2010. In 2011, they're in danger of 100 losses. And this wasn't because of sweeping losses to free agency or anything like that. In fact, the team coming back in 2011 was very similar to the 2010 AL Central champs. But we all know one major difference: Injuries.

2011 SEASON RECAP

The disastrous 13-3 opening day loss to the Blue Jays ended up being a harbinger of things to come, as the team accustomed to visiting the postseason would never even reach .500 during the 2011 season. By the middle of April, they were five games back and would never get closer. For a stretch in June and July, the Twins appeared to be returning to form. They won 15 of 17 games, but then lost six straight. They then ripped off 12 wins in 16 games to move to within five of first place on July 17. With the trade deadline approaching, it appeared a once-lost season was salvaged and the Twins were reportedly going to be buyers. Instead, they couldn't get close enough to the lead and mostly stayed pat.

And then the losing picked back up, as the Twins were 7-21 in August. In September, they've been downright awful, currently sitting at 2-14 in the month.

The highlights of the season were Francisco Liriano's no-hitter and Jim Thome slugging home runs No. 599 and 600 in the same game. But the Twins' season will be remembered for the injuries and underperformance. Only Michael Cuddyer has really had a good year for the position players. Superstars Justin Morneau and Joe Mauer only combined to play 151 games due to various lingering injuries. Even when they played, both players had the worst offensive seasons of their respective careers. Aside from Cuddyer, only Danny Valencia and Ben Revere have played in at least 100 games (Jason Kubel is sitting at 99). The lack of stability has played out on the field, as only the Mariners have scored fewer runs in the AL. Other than Scott Baker, the starting pitching has been inconsistent at best and awful at worst. And the bullpen ranks dead last in the AL in ERA.

2012 AUDIT

It's easy to blame everything on injuries, but it's pretty evident a healthy Twins team still wouldn't have been able to keep up with the Tigers. Still, just having better fortune with health would drastically improve the product in 2012. Neither Mauer nor Morneau is really old, so one would expect bounce-back seasons from both -- though there's definite concern with Morneau's concussion issues and Mauer's durability behind the plate. Having full seasons from people like Denard Span, Jason Kubel and Alexi Casilla would be a huge boost as well.

Assuming natural progression to the norm from the players who underpermed and relatively better health in 2012, the Twins are still set up quite well. They have a strong farm system (ESPN.com had it ranked seventh before the season and Baseball America ranked it 12th, though Baseball Prospectus had it 15th) and a good core at the big-league level. The one issue that needs fixing from outside the organization is the pitching staff, specifically the bullpen. Still, do not be surprised to see the Twins right back in the thick of the AL Central race next season. They need some tweaks, but not wholesale changes.

FREE AGENTS

Michael Cuddyer, OF
Jason Kubel, OF
Matt Capps, RP
Joe Nathan, RP (team option)
Clay Condrey, RP

OFFSEASON FOCUS

The first thing the Twins need to decide is where Mauer and Morneau fit. It's been reported that Morneau might be forced into mostly being a DH, due to lingering effects from his concussions. From there, the bullpen must be addressed and probably the starting rotation as well. Here are five main things that could help the Twins compete in 2012 with an eye on the future.
  • Move Mauer to first and Morneau to DH to help save their bodies and hope both return to previous form. If neither does, the Twins have serious financial problems.
  • Now that Mauer is at first base, catcher is a gaping hole. There aren't any real good catching prospects in the minors, so a veteran stopgap like Ramon Hernandez (who is a free agent) would make sense.
  • Keep both Kubel and Cuddyer to be the corner outfielders. Make Ben Revere the everyday center fielder and trust in his offensive development. This would free up Denard Span as trade bait for pitching help. The Nationals were rumored to want a new CF back at the trade deadline and Span's name was involved. The Nats have a few live, young arms at the back-end of the bullpen in Tyler Clippard, Drew Storen and Henry Rodriguez, any of whom would be a great fit between Glen Perkins and Joe Nathan. An alternative to these ideas is leaving Mauer behind the plate, playing Cuddyer at first, keeping Span and hoping to find bullpen help through free agency or minor trades. So pick one avenue.
  • Are they going to give Tsuyoshi Nishioka another shot? They probably need to try. Drastic improvement in his second American season would be a big boost.
  • A transition needs to be made from low-upside veterans in the rotation (Nick Blackburn, Brian Duensing) to younger arms like Scott Diamond, Liam Hendriks and Kyle Gibson at some point. And they've got to hope Liriano and Pavano pitch better.
Of course, if the underperformance from and injuries to so many key players continues, the Twins will be forced into a major rebuild. For now, though, there's enough past evidence to believe that 2011 was just an anomaly for several reasons.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: August 8, 2011 5:29 pm
 

On Deck: Wakefield aiming for 200

OD

By C. Trent Rosecrans


Follow all games live with CBSSports.com's GameTracker.

Tim WakefieldGoing for 200:
Boston's Tim Wakefield will take his third chance at winning his 200th game of his career. The 45-year-old knuckleballer has pitched well in his last two starts, but wasn't able to pick up the win. He gave up three runs to both the White Sox on July 29 and to the Indians on Aug. 3, going a combined 13 2/3 innings and 11 strikeouts with just four walks. Baker's looking to bounce back from a three-inning outing against the Angels on Aug. 3. He gave up five hits and four runs (three earned), throwing 77 pitches in the outing. Red Sox at Twins, 7:10 p.m. ET


Perfect timing:
If you're a team just a half-game out of first place, there are few things that can make you happier than seeing a four-game series against the Astros coming up on the schedule. Arizona is 5-5 over its last 10 games but is still just a half-game out in the National League West thanks to San Francisco's recent struggles. The Astros are 40 games under .500. Daniel Hudson starts for the Diamondbacks opposite Houston's best pitcher, Wandy Rodriguez, in the series opener tonight. Watch for Arizona's Justin Upton who is putting up MVP numbers. Upton is hitting .366/.418/..831 with seven homers and 22 RBI over his last 18 games and has a homer in his five plate appearances against Rodriguez. Astros at Diamondbacks, 9:40 p.m. ET

Ryan VogelsongThis one goes to 11?: Pittsburgh has an uphill climb in San Francisco if it wants to stop its 10-game losing streak. While the Pirates will miss Tim Lincecum in the three-game series, they have to face former Pirate Ryan Vogelsong, who is 9-1 with a 2.19 ERA. While Vogelsong's ERA is slightly higher at AT&T Park, batters aren't hitting him as well at home, putting up a .228/.290/.312 line. He's allowed just three homers in his 11 home starts. Pittsburgh's Charlie Morton got the Pirates' losing streak started in Philadelphia by allowing eight runs in four innings. He threw seven shutout innings in his last start, but the Pirates lost a 1-0 game to the Cubs. Pirates at Giants, 10:15 p.m. ET

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: July 17, 2011 6:41 pm
Edited on: July 17, 2011 7:02 pm
 

Twins place Baker on DL

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Scott BakerScott Baker won't make his scheduled start Monday in the first game of a doubleheader against Cleveland, instead he'll be put on the disabled list.

However, the move is retroactive to July 7, meaning he could be back soon.

The right-hander was diagnosed with a right flexor strain. Twins manager Ron Gardenhire told reporters after the game that Baker just didn't feel right and the team didn't want to push it.

Anthony Swarzak will pitch the day game on Monday, while lefty Scott Diamond has been called up from Triple-A to start the second game.

The team also optioned infielder Matt Tolbert to Triple-A and called up lefty Chuck James to take his place.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 30, 2011 12:46 am
Edited on: June 30, 2011 9:05 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Mets destroy Tigers' pitching



By Matt Snyder


Mets' offense. What a bloodbath. The Mets put the hurt on the Tigers' pitching staff, again, with a 20-hit, 16-run game. Oddly enough, the Mets hit zero home runs. Only three players had extra-base hits, but they just collected knock after knock. Ronny Paulino and Angel Pagan both had four hits and two doubles. Pagan and Daniel Murphy each collected four RBI. Paulino scored four runs. Pagan scored three times. Scott Hairston had a triple and three RBI. Everyone in the starting lineup had at least one hit and the following had two: Jose Reyes, Justin Turner, Carlos Beltran, Ruben Tejada and Murphy. Amazingly, this was the fourth consecutive game the Mets scored at least eight runs, which ties the longest such streak in franchise history (ESPN New York). Also, the 52 runs in the four-game stretch was a franchise record (ESPN New York). All this without David Wright or Ike Davis. They'll get to try their hot offense against none other than Justin Verlander Thursday. Something's gotta give.

Scott Baker, Twins. If not for the Mets, you'd see Baker's picture above. The right-hander has long had great stuff but lacked consistency the past two seasons and early this year. Of late, though, he's kicked things into another gear and is probably headed for his first All-Star Game (I mean, who else are you going to send from the Twins?). Wednesday afternoon, he spun a gem against the Dodgers, working 7 1/3 shutout innings, striking out nine and allowing just six hits and one walk. In Baker's last seven starts, he's 4-2 with a 2.11 ERA, 1.06 WHIP and 46 strikeouts against just nine walks. It's pretty safe to say Baker's the Twins' top pitcher at this point, and he started the season as the No. 5 starter.

Ricky Nolasco, Marlins. Here's another pitcher who seems to have great ability but can't stay consistent -- only Nolasco is more extreme on both fronts. I believe he has better stuff and he's far less consistent than Baker. Nolasco had actually been pretty bad of late, too. Heading into his Wednesday start against the A's, he was 0-3 with a 7.80 ERA in his last three starts. Throw that out the window, though, because Nolasco threw his second career shutout Wednesday. He carved through the A's lineup and only allowed five hits and two walks while striking out three. He left the bases loaded in the first, but settled in after that and cruised. Meanwhile, the Marlins picked up their fourth win in June.



Jordan Zimmermann's support. The young pitcher was brilliant Wednesday in trying to help the Nats to give Davey Johnson his first victory as the new Washington manager. Zimmermann pitched eight innings of four-hit ball. He only walked one. The only run he allowed came on a double play and was unearned due to a Ryan Zimmerman throwing error. Meanwhile, the Nationals' offense was handcuffed, accruing just five baserunners all game. So Zimmermann's ERA is down to 2.63, but he's 5-7. The Nats have now scored two runs or less in seven of Zimmermann's 16 starts. Don't pay attention to the record, the 25-year-old Zimmermann is developing into a top-of-the-rotation pitcher. 

Red Sox in interleague play. The Red Sox are 8-1 against the Yankees and have a 39-26 record against the American League. After losing to the Phillies again Wednesday night, the Red Sox are now 6-8 against the NL, including having lost two of three to the Padres and Pirates and face a sweep at the hands of the Phillies Thursday. Small sample size? Of course. Interesting? You bet.

Zach Duke, Diamondbacks. After a promising beginning to his Diamondbacks' career, Duke has been pretty bad. Wednesday, Duke lasted five innings, allowing nine hits, two walks and four earned runs. He took the loss and the D-Backs have now lost four of five, but the bigger issue is where things appear to be headed. In his last four starts, Duke is 0-2 with 9.47 ERA and 2.26 WHIP. As the D-Backs try to hang with the Giants in the NL West, this is simply not going to cut it.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: June 29, 2011 4:27 pm
Edited on: June 29, 2011 4:41 pm
 

Twins win another 1-0 game

Ben Revere

By C. Trent Rosecrans

The Twins just won another 1-0 game, their seventh overall 1-0 game and fifth victory in a 1-0 contest. Five of the seven games came at Target Field and the only two losses were on unearned runs.

Here's all of their 1-0 games this season:

June 29: Twins 1, Dodgers 0: Scott Baker went 7 1/3, allowing six hits and a walk, striking out 9. Rubby De La Rosa allowed just one run on six hits in seven innings for the Dodgers to get the hard-luck loss. The only run came in the first after Ben Revere led off the game for the Twins with a triple and Tsuyoshi Nishioka knocked in the game's only run with a dribbler down the first-base line.

June 18: Twins 1, Padres 0: Another great start by Baker, who allowed just four hits and a walk in eight innings, striking out 10. Padres starter Tim Stauffer went seven innings allowing six hits, one of them a Danny Valencia homer in the seventh inning.

June 16: Twins 1, White Sox 0: Right fielder Michael Cuddyer homered off of Mark Buehrle in the second for the only run of the game and one of three hits Buehrle surrendered in seven innings. Nick Blackburn gave up seven hits (all singles) in eight innings, walking one.

June 7: Indians 1, Twins 0: In Cleveland, Indians starter Carlos Carrasco held the Twins to just three hits in 8 1/3 innings, while Chris Perez came in for the final two outs. Minnesota starter Francisco Liriano went 5 innings, giving up three hits and an unearned run. Cleveland scored in the fourth when left fielder Delmon Young's throw allowed Carlos Santana to advance to third on his leadoff double, followed by an RBI groundout by Shelley Duncan.

May 28: Twins 1, Angels 0: Anthony Swarzak took a no-hitter into the eighth inning and Valencia's RBI single in the 10th gave Minnesota the victory. The Angels' Jered Weaver allowed just two hits in 9 innings, but Hisanori Takahashi gave up a single in the 10th inning and Jason Repko came in, Takahashi allowing three straight singles to decide the game.

May 3: Twins 1, White Sox 0: Liriano no-hit the White Sox at U.S. Cellular Field and Jason Kubel homered in the seventh for the lone run. Edwin Jackson gave up six hits in eight innings for the White Sox.

April 9: A's 1, Twins 0: With two outs in the sixth, Blackburn gave up a single to Kurt Suzuki who moved to second on a wild pitch and scored on a throwing error by shortstop Alexi Casilla for the game's only run. Minnesota used five relievers, while Gio Gonzalez allowed four hits in six innings for Oakland.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: June 7, 2011 10:31 am
Edited on: June 7, 2011 11:25 am
 

Looking back at second-round picks

Joey Votto

By C. Trent Rosecrans


While the first-round of the MLB Draft is gaining more attention in the last couple of years, the later rounds are where most of the work is done. 

The second round starts today at 11 a.m. ET, so here's a look at some of the best second-round picks in recent memory.

Angels: In 1999, the Angels took John Lackey out of Grayson County Community College with the 68th overall pick in the draft. In 1995, they took Jarrod Washburn with the first pick of the second round.

Astros: Perhaps the team's best player right now, outfielder Hunter Pence, was the 64th overall pick in 2004. 

MLB Draft

Athletics: The A's took Vista, Calif., high schooler Trevor Cahill with the 66th overall pick in 2006. Two years before that they took Kurt Suzuki in the second round and in 2003 they took Andre Ethier in the second round. They traded him for Milton Bradley and Antonio Perez in 2005.

Blue Jays: Right-hander Dave Bush in 2002 is probably the team's best second-round pick since taking Derek Bell in 1987.

Brian McCannBraves: Current first baseman Freddie Freeman was selected with the 78th overall pick in 2007, but the best pick was easily 2002's No. 64 overall pick, a local high school catcher named Brian McCann.

Brewers: The Brewers took Yovani Gallardo with the fifth pick of the second round in 2004.

Cardinals: In 2001, the team took Dan Haren with the 72nd overall pick. More recently, Jon Jay was taken in the second round of the 2006 draft.

Cubs: You have to go back pretty far -- unless you go with Bobby Hill -- to find much success with the Cubs' second-round pick, but if you go as far back as 1984, they took Greg Maddux with the third pick of the second round and he turned out OK. Also among their second-round picks is former Dallas Cowboys quarterback Quincy Carter (1996).

Diamondbacks: A's starter Brett Anderson was Arizona's second-rounder in 2006. He was part of the big trade that send Dan Haren to the Diamondbacks.

Dodgers: The Dodgers got future closer Jonathan Broxton with the 60th overall pick in 2002.

Giants: Of recent vintage, the Giants have taken Nate Schierholtz in 2003 and Fred Lewis in 2002, but the most interesting second-round pick by San Francisco was in 1982. That year they took the son of a team legend with the 11th pick of the second round (39th overall), but Barry Bonds went to Arizona State instead.

Indians: Jason Kipnis is one of the team's top prospects, taken in the second round in 2009. In 1995, the Indians took first baseman Sean Casey out of Richmond with the 53rd overall pick.

Mariners: Recently-demoted Orioles starter Chris Tillman was taken in the second round of the 2006 draft. Keep an eye on 2009 second-rounder Rich Poythress, who had 31 homers in Class A last season.

Mike StantonMarlins: It wasn't until the 12th pick of the second round -- and 76th overall -- for someone to pick up Mike Stanton in 2007. 

Mets: There's some slim pickins for the Mets recently, but few Mets fans would trade their second-rounder of 1977, Mookie Wilson. (Seriously, this one was tough, the only players the Mets have picked in the last 15 years who have made the majors were Kevin Mulvey, Neal Musser, Pat Strange and Tyler Walker -- maybe that explains some things.)

Nationals (Expos): Jordan Zimmermann was the team's second-rounder in 2007. Current Reds All-Star second baseman Brandon Phillips was taken by the Expos with the sixth pick of the second round in 1999.

Orioles: Nolan Reimold was taken 61st overall in 2005, but if you want to go back a few years, the team took Cal Ripken with the 22nd pick of the second round in the 1978 draft. Ripken was the third of four picks the Orioles had in the second round that year.

Padres: San Diego took Chase Hedley in 2005.

Phillies: Jimmy Rollins was the team's second-rounder in 1996, going 46th overall.

Pirates: Last year's pick was Stetson Allie, who many expected to go in the first round. Lefty Tom Gorzelanny was taken in the second round in 2003 and catcher Ryan Doumit was taken 59th overall in 1999.

Rangers: The only player taken by the Rangers in the second round of the last decade to make the majors is Jason Bourgeois.

Rays: The Rays famously took Josh Hamilton No. 1 overall in 1999, but their second-round pick that year was pretty good too -- Carl Crawford.

Red Sox: How about Justin Masterson (2006), Dustin Pedroia (2004) and Jon Lester (2002)?

Reds: NL MVP Joey Votto (2002) was the third pick of the second round (44th overall) and Travis Wood was taken in the second round of the 2005 draft. Keep an eye on 2009 pick Billy Hamilton, who already has 45 stolen bases this season for Class A Dayton.

Rockies: For recent vintage, Seth Smith (2004) is the pick, but you can go back a few years and pick Aaron Cook (1997).

George BrettRoyals: For all the prospects the Royals have stockpiled in the last couple of years, strangely not too many are second-rounders. Outfielder Brett Eibner (2010) was the only member of the Royals' Top 10 by Baseball America taken in the second round. You have to go back to Carlos Beltran (1995), Jon Lieber (1992), Bob Hamelin (1988), Mark Gubicza (1981), Darryl Motley (1978) and Dennis Leonard (1972) to find serious big-leaguers. Oh, and also a kid out of El Segundo, Calif., in 1971 named George Brett. He was pretty good, too.

Tigers: The Tigers took Brandon Inge with the 14th pick of the 1998 draft as a catcher out of Virginia Commonwealth. In 1976, Alan Trammell was the second pick of the round.

Twins: A nice run of arms earlier in the decade with Kevin Slowey (2005), Anthony Swarzak (2004), Scott Baker (2003) and Jesse Crain (2002). Frank Viola was the team's second-rounder in 1981.

White Sox: A's outfielder Ryan Sweeney (2003) is the team's best second-rounder since Bob Wickman (1990) -- not counting Jeff Weaver, who went back to school after he was picked in 1997 and was taken by the Tigers a year later.

Yankees: In the last 20 years, only two Yankees second-rounders have made the big leagues, Shelley Duncan (2001) and Randy Keisler (1998). Catching prospect Austin Romine was the team's second-rounder in 2007. In 1982, the team did take a shortstop from McAdory High School in Bessemer, Ala., who went on to play football at Auburn instead. His name is Bo Jackson. That was the year after the team took Stanford outfielder John Elway.

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Posted on: June 6, 2011 4:50 pm
Edited on: June 6, 2011 5:19 pm
 

On Deck: It's opposite day

OD

By Matt Snyder


We've actually got a decent slate of games for a Monday night, with 22 teams in action. Plus, there's the MLB Draft, so it's actually a nice little Monday in terms of the middle of the MLB season. Let's dive in and take a look at three matchups chock full of contradictions.

BACK TO THE PACK: The Twins have won four in a row for the first time all season. The Indians have lost four in a row for the first time all season. Of course, seeing a Twins' winning streak and Indians' losing streak wouldn't have been so surprising if things went the way they were predicted to have gone this season. Most expected the Tribe to be where the Twins are and the Twins to be toward the top. So are the recent surges simply a correction, or just a fluke? Time will tell, but the Indians still lead the Twins by 12 1/2 games. On the hill Monday evening for the Indians is Josh Tomlin (7-2, 3.27), while Scott Baker (2-4, 3.86) gets the ball for the Twins. Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. ET.

CREW TURNING TIDE: The Brewers went down to Florida with a 9-19 road record. The Marlins were 14-12 at home and right at the heels of the Phillies in the NL East. Three games later, the Brewers are in position to complete a four-game sweep in Miami. Late heroics have sparked the Brew Crew -- they've won each of the three games by one run, twice with homers in their final at-bat and once with a two-run seventh. So far in 2011, the two pitchers taking the hill Monday night haven't performed to expectations. Zack Greinke (4-1, 5.29) has been blessed with pretty incredible run support, as the Brewers have scored 29 runs in his past four starts. That accounts for his good record despite only three quality starts in six tries. On the other side, Javier Vazquez (3-4, 6.02) has been pretty bad for the Marlins this year in his return to the NL East, but he's got a 2.84 ERA with 15 strikeouts and three walks in his past three starts. Milwaukee at Florida, 7:10 p.m. ET.

BOOM VS. BUST: The White Sox host the Mariners and, again, the fact that the Mariners have a better record at this point in the season would have been quite the surprising prediction back in March. Not only that, but back in March John Danks was expected to be a reliable starter for the White Sox while there were questions about whether Michael Pineda would be held down in the minors for one more year of seasoning. Instead, Danks sits at 0-8 with a 5.25 ERA and appears to have lost all his confidence. Meanwhile, Pineda is one of the top pitchers in the American League and a bona fide Rookie of the Year contender (if not front-runner). Is Monday when their respective fortunes continue or reverse? Seattle at Chicago, 8:10 p.m. ET.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: May 28, 2011 2:12 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Rookie slams Brewers

Brandon Crawford

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Brandon Crawford, Giants -- Two days ago Crawford was in the Class A California League and Friday he was making his big-league debut. The 24-year-old found himself up with bases loaded in the seventh inning with his team down two runs. With one swing of the bat against Brewers starter Shaun Marcum, Crawford gave his team the lead and had his first hit in the majors. He was the first Giant to make  grand slam his first hit since Bobby Bonds in 1968.

Kevin Correia, Pirates -- It's no real surprise that Jon Lester is tied for the most wins in the majors with seven, but it's who he's tied with that is surprising. Yep, Correia. Signed to a two-year, $8 million deal in December, the Pirates may have made one of the offseason's best moves. Correia is 7-4 with a 3.44 ERA, going 7 1/3 innings against the Cubs on Friday, allowing just four hits and no runs. It was his sixth road win of the season.

Mike Leake, Reds -- With the Reds bullpen having thrown 31 innings in its last five games, Cincinnati needed a good outing from Leake, who was just called up from his first stint in the minors. Not only did Leake give them six innings, he allowed just  one run on seven hits, leading the Reds to just their second win in their last 10 games. Leake improved to 4-2 and picked up the first win by a Reds starter since May 16.


Rick Porcello, Tigers -- The day after Tigers starter Max Scherzer went just two innings, Porcello lasted only three. Porcello gave up six runs on six hits with two walks, giving up homers to Jacoby Ellsbury and Carl Crawford in the third inning. Porcello lost the game to a pitcher twice his age -- Porcello is 22 and Red Sox starter Tim Wakefield is 44.

Twins bullpen -- Scott Baker handed the Twins bullpen a 5-0 lead and asked them to get just six outs. He got 21, it shouldn't be too difficult to get just six, right? Alex Burnett gave up a hit and a walk, before giving way to Dusty Hughes who surrendered a three-run homer to Erick Aybar. Hughes was yanked after the next batter, Bobby Abreu singled. Jim Hoey came in and gave up a double to Torii Hunter, an RBI single to Alberto Callaspo and a sacrifice fly to Russell Branyan to tie the game. Hoey got out of the inning, but then gave up a leadoff triple to Peter Bourjos in the ninth and then Maicer Izturis singled to give the Angels the lead and eventual victory. The Twins have now allowed 49 runs in the eighth inning in 49 games.

Dave Bush, Rangers -- The right-hander gave up four hits -- three of them homers -- and five runs in the 14th inning of the Rangers' 12-7 loss to the Royals. Melky Cabrera, Eric Hosmer and Brayan Pena all homered off of Bush, with the three homers totaling 1,218 feet. The Royals were in extra innings because Alex Gordon homered off of Neftali Feliz in the ninth inning to tie the game. Feliz has blown three saves this season, all three against Kansas City.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com