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Tag:Terry Collins
Posted on: September 10, 2011 3:51 pm
 

'No plans' for Santana to pitch for Mets in 2011

Johan SantanaBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Johan Santana allowed two hits and an unearned run for the Class A Savannah Sand Gnats in the South Atlantic League playoffs on Friday, but Mets manager Terry Collins told reporters that there are "no plans" for the left-hander to return to the Mets in the final month of the 2011 season.

"The one thing we don't want to do is take a big step backward," Collins said (MLB.com). "I think the process that they've set down is going to work, and Johan's bought into it. Right now, we have no plans to see him here."

The Sand Gnats won their game on Friday to push the South Atlantic League Division Championship Series to a decisive third game on Saturday. If Savannah defeats Augusta in that game, Santana could pitch in the championship series. Another of the Mets' Class A teams, St. Lucie, is currently in the Florida State League Championship Series, but is not scheduled to play past Tuesday, Sept. 13, which wouldn't be enough for Santana to return after four day's rest. If the Sand Gnats don't have another game, Santana will likely return to New York and throw a simulated game at Citi Field.

"I'm in a rehab mode. I'm still not on a regular season mode," Santana said after Friday's game (SandGnats.com). "The next couple of days are gonna be important, once I throw my bullpen and see what they want me to do, whether it's in the big leagues, in the minor leagues, in instructional leagues or whatever it is -- we'll be ready for it as long as we find ways to perform and get strength back."

Santana threw 39 pitches on Friday, striking out one and walking one. 

"I actually threw some sliders that had some good rotation and that's what you're looking for: to just it go," Santana said. "And again, the more times you go out there, the more times you pitch, the stronger you're going to get. We are in a situation right now, where we are limited with games so we have to make some adjustments and have to throw some innings and that's what we're looking for."

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Posted on: June 26, 2011 9:46 pm
Edited on: June 26, 2011 9:50 pm
 

Sportsman of the day: Terry Collins

By Matt Snyder

Mets manager Terry Collins has guided his ballclub to a 39-39 record, despite ownership turmoil, constant trade rumors and several key injuries. They just took two of three in Texas from the defending AL Champion Rangers and are only five games behind the Braves for the NL Wild Card. But none of that is why we're talking about Collins right now.

Sunday, in an eventual 8-5 Mets win, the Rangers had several close calls go against them and were yelling at the umpires throughout the game. Manager Ron Washington was ejected. Then, the umpiring crew gave Collins a choice of which Rangers player would be ejected because of the general complaining coming from the entire team. He chose Elvis Andrus, the Rangers usual starting shortstop who was sitting out due to a wrist injury. He reportedly did so as an act of sportsmanship (ESPN Dallas), even though he wanted the umpires to toss hot-hitting Michael Young.

"I wanted [Young] out," Collins said (AP). "I was tired of watching Young hit the ball out of the ballpark. And that's who it was [doing most of the yelling], too."

Sure, it's probably the same move every other manager would have made, but Collins still went through with it. He easily could have chosen Young or big bopper Nelson Cruz. Instead, Collins picked the guy who wasn't going to see the field anyway. He deserves kudos for that.

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Posted on: June 15, 2011 8:37 pm
 

Braves deny watering down field

Turner Field

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Mother Nature sometimes has a wonderful sense of humor.

The Mets complained to Major League Baseball following Tuesday's game in Atlanta about the field being too wet and manager Terry Collins insinuated the field was watered down to help slow the Mets and Jose Reyes, who slipped three times on the field in Tuesday's 4-3 New York victory.

The response came not from Bud, but from above, as rain has delayed the start of Wednesday's game. The game began at 8:30 p.m., an hour and 20 minutes after the original scheduled start time.

Braves manager Fredi Gonzalez denied the Braves watered down the field.

"Absolutely not. There's a whole infield. Usually if you're going to do that, you'll do it right there at first base," Gonzalez told Carroll Rogers of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "There was absolutely no gamesmanship being played."

Reyes still had two stolen bases on the night despite the dirt, but Collins still believed the Braves were trying to slow down his team.

"You alter the field according to your team," Collins told the New York Times. "These guys do not steal bases. They are not a big base-stealing team, [Jordan] Schafer is about the only guy. They are a fly-ball-hitting team, not a ground-ball-hitting team, so the field was overly wet. I don't know what to say except, I'd like to move the fences in when we play against [Mike] Stanton. You can't."

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Posted on: June 2, 2011 10:40 am
Edited on: June 2, 2011 10:51 am
 

Pepper: Injuries at forefront



By Matt Snyder

BASEBALL TODAY: What will Tommy John surgery for Daisuke Matsuzaka mean for the Red Sox? What is the latest with Dan Haren? I joined Lauren Shehadi to discuss a few of the injuries around baseball. Click on the above video to check it out.

HUGHES PROGRESSING: Ailing Yankees starting pitcher Phil Hughes could begin a minor-league rehab stint soon. Hughes threw a bullpen session Wednesday night and was pain-free. If he feels no setbacks following another session Saturday -- likely a simulated game or batting practice -- the next step could very well be a rehab assignment. Hughes has been on the shelf since April 14 with an inflamed shoulder and is hoping to return before the end of the month. (NYPost.com)

ZIMM BACK IN ACTION: It's been quite a while since the Nationals had third baseman Ryan Zimmerman in the lineup, but he took a step forward Wednesday, as he played three innings in an extended spring training game. Remember, this isn't a rehab assignment -- which is limited to 30 days -- but it does mean he's ready to start getting closer to such a step. (MLB.com)

BOCHY'S PLEA: Giants manager Bruce Bochy -- who, you may have heard, recently lost his catcher for the season -- reportedly made a "passionate plea" to Joe Torre in the MLB offices about better protecting catchers from injury. Bochy doesn't want to make any sort of slide rule, but would like the league to suspend players who hit catchers not blocking the plate. Check out the full quotes on Extra Baggs. I'm against any rule changes and the general sanctimony directed at the play just because a great player got hurt, but Bochy's actually got a point. If the catcher is 100 percent blocking the plate, the runner should bowl him over. That's baseball. But if he's off to the side of the plate and the runner goes out of his way to level the catcher, that shouldn't be tolerated.

WELLS READY FOR FRESH START: Vernon Wells got off to an awful start for the Angels and then hit the DL. As he prepares to return, he's ready to forget what has already happened and look for a new beginning. Wells: "You can't go back and change that (poor start). But I guess it is a chance for a new start. You're going to see numbers 'before DL' and 'post-DL' now. You'll have that stat breakdown, before and after. I guarantee you my post-DL numbers will be better than my pre-DL numbers." (OC Register) Just in case anyone's wondering, the "before DL" numbers: .183 average, four home runs, 13 RBI, 18 runs, .527 OPS in 35 games.

MAYBE KEEP IT DOWN NEXT TIME? Rickie Weeks led off the game with a home run Wednesday night at Cincinnati. It was the third time this season he's done so in that very ballpark. He's spreading the wealth, too, because his three blasts have come off three different pitchers (Edinson Volquez, Bronson Arroyo and Mike Leake).

POWER OUTAGE: Justin Turner's eighth-inning home run for the Mets broke a 10-game homerless streak, their longest in 21 years. It also ended a 10-game streak of the sort at Citi Field, their longest home streak since 1979. Don't expect questions about moving in the fences to go away anytime soon. (NY Times Bats blog)

COLLINS ERUPTS: Of course, Mets manager Terry Collins doesn't much care about home runs, specifically, but he's getting a little tired of losing. Via ESPN New York, here we go: "I'm running out of ideas here. Do we play hard? Absolutely. That’s not the issue. The issue is not effort. That’s not it. It’s about execution. We have to add on some points when we get the lead. And I’m not looking for home runs. I’m looking for quality at-bats. We can’t make careless mistakes. We do. We give up at-bats. We can’t do that. We don’t have that kind of team." He went on for a good bit, and concluded with this: " ... maybe I’ve got to make some adjustments. And, by god, they’ll be made. I don’t know if it comes with finding different players. But they’ll be made. Something is going to be changing."

MAN OF THE HOUR: We posted about Adam Jones' brilliant catch Wednesday, and after the game the compliments from his teammates flowed. Orioles closer Kevin Gregg raved that Jones "looked like Griffey," while starting pitcher Brian Matusz said, "It was awesome. It was a good momentum thing because it put a smile on my face and it helped me relax a little bit and have fun." O's manager Buck Showalter said that Jones has been "spoiling" his teammates with his defensive play all season. (MLB.com)

PAGING CARP: Geoff Baker of the Seattle Times makes the case that the Mariners should call on prospect Mike Carp immediately and plug him in left field. The fact is the Mariners have gotten basically nothing out of left field, and Carp could give the still-weak offense a boost. He's on a 17-game hitting streak with a .325 average and 14 homers in Triple-A. Meanwhile, Carlos Peguero is reeling in left for the big-league club, which is currently only 1 1/2 games out of first place in the up-for-grabs AL West. As I find myself doing more often than not, I agree with Baker. The Mariners are right in the mix and need more offense.

NO JOYCE FOR D-BACKS: One of the feel-good stories from last season was how umpire Jim Joyce and pitcher Armando Galarraga came together following Joyce's blown call that cost Galarraga a perfect game. It even ended up with the two collaborating on a book -- "Nobody's Perfect: Two Men, One Call, and a Game for Baseball History" -- which is being released Thursday. Due to the business relationship, Joyce has been forbidden by Major League Baseball to work any Arizona Diamondbacks games. Galarraga is not even with the D-Backs at present, as he's in Triple-A, but Joyce is still not allowed to do any Arizona games. (ESPN.com)

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Posted on: April 14, 2011 10:34 am
 

Pepper: McGwire only one to dodge steroid fallout

McGwire

By Evan Brunell

DODGING THE BULLET: The steroid era continues to haunt baseball, as Barry Bonds' obstruction of justice charge is far from the end of the saga.

While Bonds is the posterboy for the whole mess, the former face of baseball has somehow survived a Congressional inquiry, years of self-imposed exile, a much-awaited admission and apology and returned to the game as a coach.

No one could have guessed this when Mark McGwire was stumbling over ways to avoid the past in front of Congress, but he's the only star to avoid any lasting damage, unless one counts his failed bids to make the Hall of Fame. It does really seem as if his lawyers gave him the right information all the way back in 2003 as he avoided lying to Congress and then hid away until it benefited him to come clean to avoid prosecution and get back into the game.

Look, there's no defending McGwire, both for his actions juicing up and for waiting until it behooved him best to admit using steroids, but in his second season as Cardinals hitting coach, there is no paparazzi stalking him and no controversy. At this point, McGwire is just another coach with a long history in the game. That's an impressive feat to pull off. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

BASEBALL TODAY: Can Cliff Lee get back on track tonight? Will Phil Hughes lower his ERA? Matt Snyder joins Lauren Shehadi to answer those questions and more.

STRASBURG BEHIND: Stephen Strasburg has yet to throw off a mound in his return from Tommy John surgery. That places him behind Jordan Zimmermann's own schedule last season, but the Nationals have cautioned everyone rehabs at their own pace and there is no rush. Strasburg has a shot to pitch in September for Washington, but given he has yet to step on a mound, that shot has suddenly become a long one. (Washington Post)

MANNY WHO? The Rays have already found a solution for replacing Manny Ramirez's bobblehead night on May 29. In his place, the club will give away a cape dedicated to Sam Fuld, who was a one-man wrecking crew in the abbreviated two-game series against the Red Sox. Click the link to check out the cape, which is pretty cool. (Tampa Tribune)

GOING CRAZY: Well, that didn't take long. Skipper Terry Collins reportedly went "ballistic" after Wednesday's stinker. A player said Collins didn't single anyone out, but made it clear he wasn't happy with how New York was responding to its recent slide, having lost six of seven. (New York Post)

PANIC ALERT: At the outset of the 2011 season, one keeps hearing how it's too early to draw any conclusions from the play of teams or players. But for one certain writer, it's never too early as he encourages you to go right ahead and panic. Something about how it's healthy and fun to panic. Me? I'd prefer to stay even-keeled, thanks. (Sports Illustrated)

SHORTSTOP PAINS: The Brewers are incredibly thin at shortstop, both at the major-league and minor-league level. Luiz Cruz left the organization to sign with the Rangers despite Milwaukee telling him he would be the first option up to the majors if needed. Then, Triple-A third baseman/shortstop Zelous Wheeler got injured, leaving journeyman Anderson Machado as the first line of defense at short. And if your first line of defense is Machado, you've got serious problems. (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel)

TILLMAN BOMBED: Chris Tillman was smacked around by the Yankees on Wednesday, and manager Buck Showalter made it clear after the game that it was unacceptable. "You just can’t let them get away from you and keep the team in the game," he said, also declining to confirm Tillman would make his next start Monday. (Baltimore Sun)

UBALDO RETURNING: Rockies ace Ubaldo Jimenez had a strong rehab outing Wednesday and should make his return to the majors on Monday. (MLB.com)

BACK TO THE ROTATION? Jeff Samardzija has shuttled back and forth between the rotation and bullpen in his fledgling career and may be settling into a niche as a reliever. However, when the team needs a fifth starter again next week, manager Mike Quade says he'll be forced to consider Samardzija along with a host of other options. (Chicago Sun-Times)

MEETING THE PRESIDENT: A select number of Houston Astros coaches and players had lunch with former president George H.W. Bush, an invitation that occurs once a year. "I was a little star-struck when I saw him," third baseman Chris Johnson said. "You see athletes all the time. That’s totally different. It’s totally on another level." (Houston Chronicle)

HAPPY 70, CHARLIE HUSTLE: Pete Rose turns 70 on Thursday, an unthinkable thought to those who grew up idolozing Rose and the Big Red Machine. (South Florida Sun-Sentinel)

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Posted on: April 8, 2011 12:16 pm
Edited on: April 8, 2011 1:00 pm
 

Mets plan to be aggressive on bases

By Evan Brunell

PaganCiti Field is a pitcher's park. Everyone knows that, but that doesn't bother manager Terry Collins nor the players, who want to take advantage of the park's dimensions -- including the 414-foot gap in right-centerfield.

With the park the way it is, the Mets have to put a greater emphasis on speed and defense as opposed to, say, Rangers Ballpark in Arlington. That's OK with Collins, who plans to have the team run much more aggressively than seasons past as Newsday reports.

"It's like that NBA coach wanting a shot every eight (it's really seven) seconds," Collins said, referring to the Knicks' Mike D'Antoni. "The more shots you take, the more opportunities you have to score."

There will certainly be mistakes made, such as when David Wright, on first, tried to make it to third on a single with no out in a game with the Marlins. He was thrown out, violating a cardinal rule -- but Collins had no qualms with it, given how perfect the circumstances had to be to get Wright out. In the same vein, Angel Pagan busted his chops to get to third from first on a single against the Phillies and later scored on a passed ball. Pagan, for one, could directly benefit from a more aggressive approach after stealing 37 bases last season. It's entirely feasible he could crack 50.

"There's going to be some times where probably we get thrown out at third with nobody out," Wright said. "But if you're going to make a mistake, I'd rather see it done on the aggressive side. I think that we have to continually kind of remind ourselves that's how we're going to play and that's what's going to make us successful."

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Posted on: April 1, 2011 12:22 pm
Edited on: April 1, 2011 2:09 pm
 

Collins writes open letter to Mets fans

By Matt Snyder

With his team set to open the 2011 season, new Mets manager Terry Collins took the time to write an open letter to fans of the maligned ballclub. (MLB.com )

Among the things in the letter, Collins told fans that the Mets would play the game the right way, in that his players would "always hustle on the bases, run balls down in the outfield and never take anything for granted."

He also took the time to talk up the players on the roster, naming nearly everyone on the opening day roster. He talks about Carlos Beltran's class in moving to right field, Angel Pagan's great 2010 season and how great the outfield will be when Jason Bay is back at full strength.

Collins calls Jose Reyes "one of the most dynamic players in the game," and mentions David Wright will add to his totals from last season. After hitting on Ike Davis, Brad Emaus and Josh Thole, he goes through the pitching staff almost one by one.

For the close, Collins said: "It's been 12 years since I have started a season as a Major League manager. I can't tell you how proud I am to be leading the New York Mets and am very excited about the season ahead."

I love the style here. Collins has a fan base that is disgruntled with how things have gone in recent years and he's continuing to build a relationship with the fans like he's been doing all spring. He's a true professional.

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Category: MLB
Posted on: March 31, 2011 8:20 am
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:33 am
 

Pepper: Opening day excitement

Yankee Stadium
By C. Trent Rosecrans

No day in the year probably evokes as many cliches as opening day. Several times today you'll hear of hope and optimism and that's total crap.

There's no reason for the Pirates fans or Astros fans or Royals fans to think 2011 will be any different than 2010. But the thing is, the beauty of the baseball season isn't that every team has a chance. It's that there are 162 games and no matter how bad the team, they'll still win three times out of every eight games. 

Even watching the Mariners for 162 this season, you'll still have walk-off wins, reasons for hope, shutouts thrown, home runs hit and a whole lot of baseball. It's a beautiful thing.

And then there's a team that you don't think has a chance that somehow stays atop the standings. Sure, they may not win it all, or even make the playoffs, like the Padres last season. But they still bring some excitement and reasons to watch through August and September. The ride isn't half the fun, it's all the fun.

Even without a spot at the top of the standings, there's a reason to go to the ballpark -- heck, going to the ballpark is reason enough. A hot dog, a beer and an afternoon game in the bleachers? Heaven, even if two also-rans are on the field.

Then there's rookies to watch and dream about their potential or the veteran to remember him in his prime.

Yeah, baseball is full of the cheesy cliches, but that's another part of the fun. I'm cheesy about the start of baseball season and I just don't care. (Of course, this is coming from someone who spent the last minutes leading up to a NCAA National Championship game back in the media room watching a Royals opener on TV right up until tipoff when I reluctantly went to my courtside seat to the game, so I may be a little messed up in the head.)

TENSION: Imagine going into the last day of the exhibition season unsure of your fate and then throwing a pickoff move into right field with two outs and a 1-0 lead in the ninth inning that leads to the losing runs. That can't feel good.

And then, well, being called into the manager's office right before the final cuts are announced. Really, really not good.

Except, after A's manager Bob Geren went over Bobby Cramer's gaffe, he then congratulated him on making the team.

Cramer, a 10-year minor league veteran, made his first opening day roster and will be the A's long reliever. (San Francisco Chronicle)

TICKETS AVAILABLE:  The guys who brought you last year's Mets help wanted video with not-John Ricco, are back trying to sell Mets opening day tickets.

While not as good as their last Mets video, it's still pretty good.

 

MO BETTER: We know Mariano Rivera has been really good for a really long time, but check out his run as the Yankees' closer against all the other closers since he took over in New York in this great graphic from the Washington Post.

HOPEFUL HAPP: Astros lefty J.A. Happ still hopes to get back to pitch on his turn in the team's rotation, Sunday against the Phillies. The former Phillie, Happ, would be facing former Astro, Roy Oswalt in the final game of the opening series. (Houston Chronicle)

VIVA ANAHEIM: I think I've already named about three "best promo ever" winners, but this is my current favorite -- the Angels' Mexican wrestler mask. I so wish I could be in SoCal in May, instead I'll be in Ireland. Oh well. (Orange County Register)

MEET THE METS: The Mets are trying to embrace their blogging community and hosted a conference call with manager Terry Collins on Monday. (Networked Blogs)

BURNETT SICK: Yankees starter A.J. Burnett is dealing with the flu, but says he still expects to make his scheduled start on Saturday. (New York Daily News)

BASEBALL HEALING: I lived in Japan for a couple of years and I've told people many times about the high school baseball tournament and the best way I've been able to describe it is the NCAA basketball tournament -- but only better, because it's baseball. It's even more important this year. (Associated Press)

PIRATES LIKELY TO BEAT PREDICTION: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review columnist Joe Starkey doesn't have high hopes for the Pirates this season. That's understandable. That said, I think they'll do better than his 9-153 perdecition.

TATER TROT RETURNS: Larry Granillo is bring back the Tater Trot Tracker. For those of you who missed it last year, the blogger tracked the time of every home run trot i the majors last season. He's doing the tracker for Baseball Prospectus this year, check out what he learned last season.

UNIWATCH: The always awesome Uniwatch baseball preview. There aren't too many changes this year, except for the Dodger throwbacks and the end of the Blue Jays' powder blues.

SAFETY FIRST: MLB is taking steps to help protect players against concussions, but the players can choose to do more, and Justin Morneau is doing that. Morneau will wear the Rawlings S100 helmet this year. The oversized helmet offers more protection for a batter's head, but is the subject of ridicule by other players and fans. Some players, such as David Wright, have worn it briefly only to go back to a regular helmet after hearing the jokes. Morneau apparently doesn't think concussions are funny, and he's right. (St. Paul Pioneer Press)

BACKPEDDLING: Andre Either's agent says he'd love to stay in Los Angeles long-term. Of course he would. (Los Angeles Times)

AN APPLE A DAY: One of the most injured teams last season, the Red Sox are hoping prevention can help them beat injuries. (Boston Globe)

EXPRESS LINE: Putting aside the vogue bigger, badder, fatter concessions, two minor league clubs -- Richmond and Lehigh Valley -- are going with faster, allowing you to use your smartphone to preorder and pay for your concessions. (Ben's Biz Blog)

PREVIEW: Stephen Strasburg and Bryce Harper were on display at NatsFest at Nationals Park. Strasburg said he's hoping to start opening day 2012 for the Nats. Harper said his ankle is fine, even though there's still concern he may miss his minor league team's April 7 opener. (Washington Post)

SPEAKING OF PROSPECTS: The Kansas City Star's baseball preview section is mostly about the Royals of 2012 and beyond, instead of this year's team. Bob Dutton asks if the Royals' influx of talent means Kansas City can return to its winning ways of the 70s and 80s. And then Tod Palmer looks at how it could go wrong -- like the Pirates of the late 90s.

REMEMBERING THE DUKE: The Dodgers will wear a No. 4 patch on their uniforms to honor the late Duke Snider. (MLB.com)

DONE GOOD: Kudos for Dan Haren for his work in helping fund a Miracle League field, allowing special-needs kids a place to play baseball. (Arizona Republic)

MUST READ: This graphic novel biography of Roberto Clemente looks awesome. (Atomic Books)

WELCOME BACK: Hard-core baseball fans wept when MinorLeagueSplits.com was shut down, but a replacement has been founded -- mlsplits.drivelinebaseball.com/mlsp
lits
. Let's just say it's already been bookmarked.

LOW AND AWAY: Our friends the Baseball Project have let us use their music for our podcast, and to celebrate opening day, Yep Roc Records has the MP3 download of their album, Vol. 2: High and Inside on sale for $3.99. (Yep Roc Records)

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com