Tag:Tommy Lasorda
Posted on: November 3, 2011 11:22 am
 

Santo among Hall of Fame's Golden Era candidates

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Former Cubs third baseman Ron Santo is among eight former players and two former executives will be voted upon by the 16-member Golden Era Committee at the Winter Meetings and announced on Dec. 5.

On the list are Buzzie Bavasi, Ken Boyer, Charlie Finley, Gil Hodges, Jim Kaat, Minnie Minoso, Tony Oliva, Allie Reynolds and Luis Tiant.

The finalists are voted on by a 16-member board -- they are Hall of Famers Hank Aaron, Al Kaline, Ralph Kiner, Tommy Lasorda, Juan Marichal, Brooks Robinson, Don Sutton and Billy Williams; major league executives Paul Beeston (Blue Jays), Bill DeWitt (Cardinals), Rolan Hemond (Diamondbacks), Gene Michael (Yankees) and Al Rosen (retired); as well as media members Dick Kaegel (MLB.com), Jack O'Connell (BBWAA) and Dave Van Dyck (Chicago Tribune).

The Golden Era Committee currently uses a three-year cycle of consideration for managers, umpires, executives and long-retired players by era.

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Posted on: September 19, 2011 2:18 pm
Edited on: September 19, 2011 2:19 pm
 

Lasorda to serve as honorary coach Thursday

By Matt Snyder

Legendary Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda will suit up in his old garb Thursday as an honorary coach. The invitation was extended by current Dodgers manager Don Mattingly in honor of Lasorda's 84th birthday. Fittingly, the game is against the rival San Francisco Giants.

“I am so deeply honored and grateful that Don would ask me to do this,” said Lasorda in a Dodgers press release.  “I loved every minute of managing during my 20 seasons with the Dodgers and it is always outstanding to put on the Dodger uniform.”

It will be the first time Lasorda's been in unform for the Dodgers in the regular season since his retirement. He has managed them in spring training -- for eight games in 2008.

Lasorda managed 3,040 regular-season games for the Dodgers, winning 1,599. He was a two-time NL Manager of the Year and won four National League pennants and two World Series. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the veteran's committee in 1997.

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Posted on: July 8, 2011 10:15 am
Edited on: July 8, 2011 1:09 pm
 

Pepper: @DatDudeBP leads MLB tweeters

By C. Trent Rosecrans



BASEBALL TODAY:
CBSSports.com senior writer Danny Knobler joins Lauren Shehadi to talk about Derek Jeter, but also notes these games against the Yankees are not just big for Jeter's chase of 3,000 but also vital for the Rays. There's also the Braves-Phillies series, but Danny points out why that may not be as big of a series.

TWITTER 140: Our own @JamesonFleming put together the sports world's top 140 Twitter users and the Cincinnati Reds' Brandon Phillips (@DatDudeBP) comes in as baseball's best Twitter user.

Phillips didn't start using Twitter until this offseason, but has embraced the technology, holding contests for fans and also taking suggestions on restaurants and off-day activities. Earlier this season, a teen asked Phillips to come to his baseball game on a day the Reds were off, and Phillips stopped by. He also sent a pair fans to spring training and then another pair to San Francisco for the Reds' games at AT&T Park.

He has even won over some Cardinals fans, an amazing feat considering Cardinal nation's distaste for the Reds second baseman, who last year used not-so-nice words to describe Tony La Russa's club.

Florida's Logan Morrison (@LoMoMarlins) is fourth on the list and the second baseball player. Brewers closer John Axford (@JohnAxford) is the third MLB player in the Top 10.

LAST ONE THE TOUGHEST: George Brett told the Associated Press he thought the last hit would be the toughest for Derek Jeter in his quest for 3,000. Of course, Brett reached the mark with a four-hit game. Brett also said he wasn't sure how many more players would reach the milestone.

"Is that desire still going to be there when they're worth $250 million when they're 37 years old?" Brett said.

GOTTA BE THE SHOES: Jeter will be wearing special shoes for his 3,000th hit, and you can get a matching pair. Yahoo!'s Big League Stew has all the details on the details of the shoes.

JETER'S BALLS: One more Jeter entry -- a look at the special baseballs that MLB will use to try to track Jeter's 3,000th hit. [BizofBaseball.com]

CARDS LOCK UP GARCIA?: There are reports from the radio station partially owned by the Cardinals that say the team has reached a four-year deal with two option years with left-hander Jaime Garcia. The deal would cover all three arbitration years and one year of free agency for the 25-year-old Garcia. He's 8-3 this season with a 3.23 ERA and is 22-12 with a  3.07 ERA in his career. [MLB.com]

HARPER STILL TOPS: Baseball America released its Midseason Top 50 Prospects List, and the Nationals' Bryce Harper leads the list, followed by Angels outfielder Mike Trout and Rays' lefty Matt Moore.

ALL-STAR SWITCH: Royals right-hander Aaron Crow may have made the All-Star team as a reliever, but Kansas City manager Ned Yost sees the team's former first-rounder as a starter down the line, as soon as next spring. [MLB.com]

DOCTOR MAY NAME NAMES: Canadian Dr. Anthony Galea has pleaded guilty to a felony charge of bringing unapproved drugs into the United States to treat athletes, and he may be pressed to give the names of athletes he treated and gave illegal drugs. Jose Reyes and Carlos Beltran of the Mets are among the players who have been treated by Galea in the past. [New York Times]

BORAS SPEAKS AT SABR: Super-agent Scott Boras talked of his love of baseball at the Society for American Baseball Research's annual conference on Thursday. Boras talked about his first superstar -- a cow on his family's farm. [Orange County Register]

SCHILLING TALKS PEDS: Former All-Star Curt Schilling went on a Philadelphia radio station Wednesday and said that no "team in the last 20 years that's won clean." Schilling said he thinks the recent decline in offensive numbers are because of MLB's testing policies. [SportsRadioInterviews.com]

NO TAPE MEASURE NEEDED: Ever wonder how they calculate home-run distances so quickly? There's a chart, of course, but how is that chart made? Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch has that story.

CRADLE OF MANAGERS: The Kansas City A's didn't produce a lot of wins, but they did produce their fair share of managers. Tommy Lasorda, Billy Martin, Whitey Herzog, Joe Morgan (not the Hall of Famer, but the former Red Sox manager), Dick Williams, Hank Bauer, Dick Howser and Tony La Russa all played for the A's in KC. Two of the game's more successful coaches, Dave Duncan and Charlie Lau, also played for the A's during their stint in Kansas City. [Joe Posnanski]

SLUGGER EMPATHY: Twins designated hitter Jim Thome said it wasn't his place to comment on Adam Dunn's struggles, but said he did empathize with the struggling Chicago DH. "As a guy who swings and misses and has struck out a ton, it's hard," Thome told the Chicago Tribune. "When you can have success and are blessed to play a long time and [then go through] those periods, it's tough."

NO STARS FOR ALL-STARS: Major League Baseball has added stars to the uniforms of All-Stars, but apparently the designations are purely optional, as the Cardinals' three All-Stars declined to take part to keep their uniforms uniform. [St. Louis Post-Dispatch]

STARLING UNDECIDED: The Royals took a gamble when they picked prep outfielder Bubba Starling with the fifth overall pick in last month's draft, as Starling is also a top-flight quarterback committed to Nebraska. Starling told the Kansas City Star he hasn't decided whether he's going to play football for Nebraska or sign with the Royals for millions of dollars. Starling said he's going to Lincoln, Neb., on Saturday and will work out with the team, but won't enroll in classes for the summer.

SAVES RECORD: You need more evidence they keep stats for everything? Braves closer Craig Kimbrel has set the record for most first-half saves by a rookie. Kimbrel's 27th save Thursday broke the record of 26 set by Boston's Jonathan Papelbon in 2006. [Atlanta Journal-Constitution]

LAWRIE PROGRESSING: Just before he was scheduled to be called up in May, Blue Jays prospect Brett Lawrie suffered a broken hand after being hit by a pitch. Lawrie began hitting off a tee earlier this week, and he's improving. The team doesn't expect him to be able to play in games until August. [MLB.com]

ROYAL SHAME: The Royals have once again taken the cheap route in their tribute to the Nergro Leagues, ditching the vintage uniforms. While there are many good signs for the Royals' future, this is a reminder that David Glass is still the owner. [Kansas City Star]

MYTHBUSTER: Scientists are using a lab at Washington State to measure some baseball physics. Among the findings, corked bats don't work, humidors do, and the balls from 2004 performed the same as a ball from the late 70s. [Popular Mechanics]

REMEMBERING BUDDIN: Former Red Sox shortstop Dan Buddin died last week. He's remembered mostly for not being very good -- he averaged 30 errors a year and didn't hit very well, either. A really good remembrance by FanGraphs.com's Alex Remington on the man Boston booed.

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Posted on: February 23, 2011 11:29 am
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:48 am
 

Pepper: Alligator fighting, Lasorda swearing

Pujols

MONEY MAKES THE WORLD GO 'ROUND: White Sox GM Kenny Williams is defending his comments that a $30-million man would be bad for the game.

"All I'm interested in is the game," Williams told MLB.com. "We're just caretakers of this game, all of us: you guys, me, the players. We're caretakers of this game to the next generation. And then the next generation after that."

With Albert Pujols poised to enter free agency after the season, possibly commanding up to $30 million annually, Williams had ruled out the possibility of the White Sox going after the star, noting that he felt it was more appropriate to spread out dollars than to tie it up in one person. There's some sentiment for that given tying up massive dollars in one person is risky. All it takes is one injury to derail the season. Take the news that Adam Wainwright may need Tommy John surgery, for example. That's a massive blow to the Cardinals, who essentially rely on Chris Carpenter, Wainwright, Pujols and Matt Holliday to drive the team.

However, the flip side is the value Pujols gives in that one spot, freeing up chances to get league-average or better players at other spots. These type of players are far easier to get than the superstar. There's no right answer here, but it's obvious which side of the fence Williams falls on.

Williams used the opportunity to speak about parity in the game and how high-salaried superstars are essentially limited to a small pool of teams, which he is not a fan of.

"It's important that the people and the [small-market] cities ... and many more have just as much chance to hope and dream about their team winning a World Series as anybody else," Williams added. "Right now, that's not happening." (MLB.com)

I'M A CREEP, I'M A WEIRDO: Carl Crawford was "creeped out" when he found out that as part of due diligence, the Red Sox had a scout following him off the field. Obviously, it didn't stop Crawford from signing with Boston once GM Theo Epstein told him, but he admitted he was not comfortable with the idea of someone following him, although it's standard practice for Boston to monitor every major free-agent's off-the-field activities. Hey, can't blame Crawford. To learn someone's been tracking your movements over the last few months away from the ballpark is creepy. (ESPN Boston)

I'M TIRED AND I'M HUNGRY AND MY TAIL'S FROZE: Mike Stanton can sure pack away the food as roommate Gaby Sanchez says. The two, who are rooming together in spring training, recently went grocery shopping and Sanchez experienced sticker shock at the total price: over $300. "When we finished, I said, 'You got to be kidding me that we spent that much money," Sanchez said. "[The shopping cart] was completely full. We had to take three trips to get [the groceries] from the car into the house, and it was me and him carrying stuff too." Sanchez also adds he is likely to be the chef, but is willing to let Stanton take a crack at cooking. But Stanton only gets "one chance" to make good food. (Miami Herald)

THE NEXT STEVE IRWIN?: J.D. Drew isn't exactly the type of guy to make one say "That dude would totally wrestle an alligator bare-handed." Except that wouldn't be too far off the mark. Drew recounted a story Tuesday night in which he was fishing with his son and hooked a gator with a fishing lure. Drew was readying to jump on the alligator and take care of business (with a knife in tow), but the lure snapped just in the nick of time for the alligator. So next time you call J.D. Drew "Nancy Drew," you may want to rethink that. (Boston Globe)

I SPY TOMMY LASORDA SWEARING: When Google Books indexed Spy Magazine, it opened up a treasure trove of baseball facts. Such as an expletive-filled rant Tommy Lasorda had with Doug Rau, the starting pitcher in Game 4 of the 1977 World Series. You'll have to head on over to read the conversation, but it's fascinating -- but not for those who don't like strong language. Also in the article is far too much information one could ever want to know about George Brett's hemorrhoids and sex life. (Spy Magazine, Google Books)

WAINO'S NOT THE ONLY ONE: Vincente Padilla's no Adam Wainwright, but the Dodgers are hurting with the news Padilla needs surgery to release a nerve that is trapped by a muscle in his forearm. Sounds painful. There's no timetable for the No. 6 starter/reliever's return. (Los Angeles Times)

GRIFFEY, JR. ATTEMPTED SUICIDE: OK, this article is from 1992 so it's not exactly timely, but I've never heard of this before. Apparently, at age 17, Ken Griffey, Jr. attempted suicide by taking approximately 277 aspirin. "It seemed like everyone was yelling at me in baseball, then I came home and everyone was yelling at me there," Griffey said way back when. "I got depressed. I got angry. I didn't want to live." Obviously, the attempt did not work and baseball is far better off for it. (New York Times)

GUILLEN READYING FOR RETIREMENT: If Jose Guillen doesn't get a contract offer within the next week, he will retire. Hard to imagine there's much demand for a first-baseman/outfielder/DH with a bad attitude who struggled through injuries before being busted amid HGH allegations. (MLB Trade Rumors translation of ESPNDeportes)

HATERS GONNA HATE: When Astros GM Ed Wade signed reliever Brandon Lyon last season to a three-year, $15 million deal, he was exoriciated for giving so much money to a middling middle reliever. But now that the relief market has exploded, Wade's looking pretty good, as this article details. But has anyone considered that Lyon was the reason the relief market has exploded and become wildly overpaid? (Houston Chronicle)

-- Evan Brunell

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Posted on: July 17, 2010 1:39 pm
Edited on: July 17, 2010 2:01 pm
 

Padres looking to extend Black

Bud Black The Padres hope to sign manager Bud Black to an extension, the San Diego Union-Tribune 's Bill Center writes .

"I hope something gets done by the end of the season," general manager Jed Hoyer told Center.

The Padres hold a club option for Black in 2011 after he was given a one-year extension last August.

Black is the rare former pitcher to be a manager and the Padres pitching staff has responded to Black, leading the majors in ERA (3.22) and WHIP (1.22).

Black is currently the only former pitcher managing in the big leagues. The last former pitcher to win a playoff series as a manager is Roger Craig (1989) and the last one to win a World Series is Tommy Lasorda (1988).

As manager of the Padres, Black is in his fourth season with a 279-297, including 52-37 this season. His only full-season with a winning record was his first, 2007, when the Padres went 89-74 and finished third in the NL West. As a pitcher, Black was 121-116 with a 3.84 ERA in 15 seasons with five different teams, including a World Series title with the 1985 Royals.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com