Tag:Marlins
Posted on: September 6, 2011 10:37 am
 

Pepper: Capping Strasburg's 2012 innings

Strasburg

By Evan Brunell

Inning limit: As Stephen Strasburg prepares to dazzle baseball with his skills Tuesday night in his much-anticipated return from Tommy John surgery, the question arises as to exactly how many innings the Nats can get out of its presumptive ace next season.

As the Washington Times writes, Washington determines inning limits on an individual basis, taking into account "their age, conditioning, innings in the previous season and big- league innings before the injury." For example, Jordan Zimmermann was shut down at 161 1/3 innings this season, the season after his own Tommy John surgery. That represented a 20 percent increase over his previous career-high set in 2009, which is a traditional barometer in baseball.

Assuming the same 20 percent increase, Strasburg would throw 147 innings in 2012, up from 2010's 123 2/3 innings between the majors and minors. That limit is based off his previous high, not off any complications from the surgery, which could factor in -- although other pitchers have cracked 200 innings a year after surgery, so that shouldn't hold Strasburg back. Washington won't make any type of determination until spring training, which is the smart move. Bank on a cap similar to Zimmermann's 160, but that could always change if the Nats find themselves in a postseason race down the stretch.

Mattingly eager
: Don Mattingly, skipper of the Dodgers, is eager to see Strasburg at work against the Dodgers.  "He's created a buzz, that's for sure, last year, and [he] continues to," Mattingly told MLB.com. "And he's produced. When he's pitched, he's pitched well."

Span back: The concussed Span is back with the Nationals after resting at home in Tampa for the past week. Span, who suffered the injury on June 3 and later hit the disabled list retroactive to Aug. 3, still harbors hope of returning this season. "I do truly believe that I will be back on the field," Span told MLB.com. "When? I don't know. But I will be back out there. If things go good, I would like to go into the offseason having played in some games here. I'd rather do that than go into the offseason not playing at all."

It's always interesting to hear a player's take on concussions, as it remains a relatively new (at least, as far as admitting the injury and properly diagnosing it goes) injury and one that is still undergoing plenty of research. Here's Span's take:

"It's not a normal injury," he said. "Sometimes you start wondering if people believe what you're telling them about how you feel. So mentally, it's little things like that. You know how this game is and all masculine sports -- everybody feels that if you're not bleeding, you should go out there and play. And I tried doing that, so it's not like I didn't try. So that's been tough for me."

Retirement? Hideki Okajima doesn't know what his future will hold, but it's definitely not Boston. Despite pitching well in Triple-A after a failed early-season stint with the Red Sox, Okajima hasn't returned since being outrighted off the 40-man. Once a strong setup man, the ensuing years haven't been kind to the Japanese left-hander, but he didn't help himself by saying he'd rather remain in Pawtucket than return to Boston when he was first demoted back down to Triple-A.

Now, Okajima isn't sure what type of offers he will get from other clubs in the winter, but wouldn't rule out a return back to Japan or even retirement.

"I didn't expect to be in this situation, but this is reality," he told the Providence Journal. "I am here. It's obviously very disappointing to be in this situation in this point in the year, but this is reality and this is where I belong right now. I've accepted that fact and just have to rethink how I approach the game so I can be where I want to be next season."

Ziegler adjusting: It took some time for the former A to adjust to life as a Diamondback, both with the transition to the NL and trying to conform to Arizona's philosophy of varying times to the plate to help control the running game. He hasn't allowed a run or walk in his last 4 1/3 innings over six games, stranding eight baserunners. "The National League style of ball is different and it took a little getting used to," Ziegler told MLB.com. "Hitters are more aggressive early in the count and it made a difference just in how I had to approach each at-bat."

9/11: The Yankees won't be in the city for the 10th anniversary of terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11 this Sunday, so will hold a ceremony on Wednesday. Click through to read what the ceremony will hold. (MLB.com)

Furcal wants to return: Rafael Furcal hopes to return to the Cardinals after the year, a prospect St. Louis is hoping comes to pass. The Cards have a busy offseason on their hands, so Furcal may have to wait, but given the shortstop's brittle body, isn't expected to command a significant deal. Ideally, the Cards would ink Furcal for one season on an incentive-laden contract. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

Social media: After being part of one of the more controversial plays -- and certainly the most controversial in replay history thus far -- the Marlins' Bryan Peterson discussed the play for a half-hour on Twitter before calling it quits when tweets got derogatory. It's incredible how fast the social media revolution has hit baseball, as now players are taking to Twitter to discuss controversial plays with the fanbase. That would have been unheard of five years ago. (MLB.com)

Drafting time: Baseball players take their fantasy sports seriously. Just check out this photo Matt Kemp tweeted of the Dodgers' fantasy football draft. (Kemp's Twitter)

Rookie time: The Marlins called up third baseman Matt Dominguez as part of September callups. It's the first stint in the bigs for Dominguez, who was considered a heavy favorite to open the year as the starting third baseman. He won't play extensively down the stretch, but will be showcasing himself to be next season's starting third baseman. (MLB.com)

Good news: The Mets got encouraging reports on two injured players integral to the team. Johan Santana is proceeding on pace and will throw on Friday in a minor-league game. With playoffs likely over after the weekend, that would line up Santana's next stint to come in the majors, where he'd throw two or three innings. Meanwhile, Ike Davis participated in baseball activities all weekend pain-free. Doctors still need to sign off on his ankle, but it appears as if he will be 100 percent for spring training. (ESPN New York)

Speaking of... Speaking of Davis, here's some more stuff on the Mets first baseman, who believes he won't need surgery on his ankle. "The bottom line is there are gonna be some effects from this my whole life," Davis told the New York Post. "Either arthritis or something else later on, but as long as it's not sharp pain, [I can play]." While doctors are expected to sign off on his ankle, Davis says it's a day-to-day thing at this point, so surgery remains possible.

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Posted on: September 4, 2011 10:17 pm
 

Guillen says he wants to stay in Chicago

Ozzie GuillenBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Today's Ozzie Guillen update: the White Sox manager says he wants to stay in Chicago.

Before Sunday night's game, Guillen was asked about his "strength of conviction to return." His answer:

"Two-thousand percent," Guillen said (MLB.com). "That's the talk about dinner, lunch, sleep, everything. This is the talk with my family. And we never change one bit. All my time, my desire, everything has been Chicago.

"See this White Sox logo? I'm part of that. I wish I could be in the Hall of Fame one time, so I could wear this freaking uniform. That's how much I love this organization."

Guillen said he's not sure what he would do if he was asked to change his coaching staff.

On Saturday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported general manager Kenny Williams had an argument with hitting coach Greg Walker. Earlier in the week the newspaper reported that Guillen and Williams' relationship was "beyond repair" and then Guillen said he wouldn't manage next season without an extension. Guillen is under contract for 2012.

Without meaningful games to be played to take the attention away from Guillen's future (the White Sox are fading fast in the American League Central), and that question may not be answered quickly. The big question is if Guillen will go -- or the White Sox will let him go -- to the Marlins, who open a new ballpark in 2012 and their current manager, Jack McKeon, reportedly will not return next season.

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Posted on: September 4, 2011 3:53 pm
Edited on: September 4, 2011 8:54 pm
 

Phillies protest loss to Marlins

Bryan Petersen
Charlie ManuelBy C. Trent Rosecrans

The Phillies finished Sunday's 5-4 loss to the Marlins in 14 innings under protest, following an instant replay review that may have cost the Phillies two runs in the sixth inning.

The protest came after umpire Joe West (who else?) used instant replay to review fans Hunter Pence double in the top of the sixth inning. After reviewing the play, Pence was called out on fan interference. Pence's ball was hit to right field, where Florida's Bryan Petersen lept to try to catch the ball, but instead a fan in a green shirt and another in a Phillies jersey and hat, leaned over the railing to try to catch the ball. The ball bounced off the fan in green's hand, just above Petersen's glove, then bounced off the outstretched hat and into the corner in right, giving Pence a double and allowing Ryan Howard to get to third.

As soon as West reviewed the play and announced Pence was out, Phillies manager Charlie Manuel argued and was ejected. In all, the delay lasted 13 minutes, with not only Manuel arguing, but also bench coach Pete Mackanin arguing it as well. Their argument was that fan interference isn't one of the approved uses of replay.

"If they wanted to see if it was for a defense play, I didn't think you could do that," Manuel told reporters (News Journal). "My understanding is that's not the rule." 

The fan clearly interfered with the ball, so ultimately it was the correct call. ESPN's Steve Berthiaume spoke with former Major League umpire Jim McKean, who told him that once the umpires decided to review whether it was a home run, the umpires could then use their judgement to rule on fan interference (Twitter).

According to the rule, the umpire can use his "sole discretion" in determining the use of replay, though Joe West told reporters the umpires were reviewing the home run (a charge Manuel denied), but that home plate umpire Chad Fairchild believed there was fan interference on the play. The second part of the matter was that the umpires ruled Pence out -- the Phillies outfielder didn't quite agree that Petersen was definitely making the catch.

"I'm going to say it's one of the best plays of the week if he makes it," Pence said (News Journal). 

Said Petersen: "I honestly don't know what happened. I thought I was going to catch the ball." (Sun-Sentinel)

The next Phillies batter after Pence, Raul Ibanez, doubled, which would have scored both Pence and Howard. Instead, after an intentional walk to load the bases, Wilson Valdez grounded into a double play to end the inning.

The Marlins then took the lead with a run in the bottom of the sixth inning with a run off of Roy Halladay.

Since the Phillies lost the game, Joe Torre will review the appeal. If Torre agrees the umpire erred, the game would be replayed from that at-bat -- but without Manuel, who was ejected. Here's a list of protested games that were later resumed, including, of course, the Pine Tar Game. No protest game has been replayed from the point of pretest since 1986 in a game between the Cardinals and Pirates.

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Posted on: September 4, 2011 2:39 pm
 

Two fans hurt in Florida

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Two fans were hurt in one inning in Sunday's Marlins-Phillies game at Sun Life Stadium. First a young boy was hit by a foul ball off the bat of outfielder Bryan Petersen and then three batters later, part of Emilio Bonifacio's bat hit a woman in the head.

According to the Philadelphia Inquirer's Matt Gelb on Twitter, there was only one set of EMTs at the game and they were tending to the boy hit by the ball when the woman was hit in the head by part of Bonifacio's bat.

Gelb tweeted that the staff at the stadium were able to move the woman hit by Bonifacio's bat.

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Posted on: September 3, 2011 9:18 pm
 

Marlins recommend Hanley Ramirez undergo surgery

RamirezBy Evan Brunell

The Marlins have recommended that star shortstop Hanley Ramirez undergo surgery, Joe Frisaro of MLB.com writes.

Ramirez will need around 4-8 months recovery from an injury termed "left shoulder instability." He hit the disabled list at the beginning of August after injuring his shoulder on a diving play, and embarked on a rehab assignment before leaving the game Tuesday with a reaggravation. A MRI showed no structural damage in Ramirez's shoulder, but it's still unstable and slipping out of joint.

No date has been set for the surgery, but Ramirez is expected to be back in time for Opening Day, although spring training is questionable.

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Posted on: September 2, 2011 2:33 pm
Edited on: September 2, 2011 3:41 pm
 

Jack McKeon will not manage Marlins after 2011

By Evan Brunell

Jack McKeon and the Marlins have agreed that someone else will manage the team next season, SI.com's Jon Heyman reports.

McKeon, who turns 81 on Nov. 23, has piloted the Marlins to a 28-35 record since taking over for Edwin Rodriguez, and there had been rumblings that both sides were interested in making the arrangement permanent. However, with this news, Florida will now enter the market for a new manager, which could end up being Ozzie Guillen of the White Sox, who has been linked to the team for the past year.

The longtime manager, however, denied the report to Jim Bowden on MLB Network Radio, saying there is "no truth" to it.

McKeon, if he wants to, will remain with the Marlins in some capacity if he does not return as skipper.

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Category: MLB
Posted on: September 1, 2011 7:31 pm
 

Johnson won't start again in 2011, Hanley update

By Matt Snyder

Marlins ace pitcher Josh Johnson won't start again the rest of the season, though he's going to throw from the mound at least a few times the rest of the way, even if it's only simulated action.

“He is just getting on the mound now, and he has 27 days to get all the way ramped up," Marlins president Larry Beinfest said (Fish Tank blog). "We just want to get him on the mound, even if it’s simulated in Jupiter and just have him feel good and tell us that he feels good ... "

“You rewind this whole thing we thought it was gonna be a two-week thing and that was four months ago.”

Yes, we're coming up on four months. Johnson last pitched on May 16. All you ever heard about a timetable when relating to Johnson's inflamed right shoulder was that there was no timetable -- but they'd know more in a few weeks. And things just kept lingering and lingering. Now, it appears he'll end the season with a 3-1 record and 1.64 ERA. It's too bad, as he looked to be in prime form to contend for a Cy Young award. Instead, he's a 27-year-old veteran who has only made 30 or more starts in a season one time. He's had Tommy John surgery and this now this inflammation issue.

The other man who was expected to be a face of the franchise as the Marlins finally moved into a baseball-only facility in 2012 is Hanley Ramirez, and his season is also in jeopardy.

The update for Thursday is that no structural damage was found in Ramirez's MRI, but it's unstable as it's fallen out of socket recently. Surgery is still a possibility and the recovery time from such a procedure would be anywhere from four to eight months.

“He’s not going to be activated Friday and we need to get it taken care of. Again, we will have more clarity this weekend exactly what that means," Beinfest said (Fish Tank blog).

Considering the Marlins are going nowhere in 2011, it seems like Ramirez should just get the surgery done as soon as possible.

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Posted on: August 31, 2011 6:34 pm
Edited on: August 31, 2011 6:38 pm
 

Report: Ramirez's season in jeopardy

By Matt Snyder

Hanley Ramirez's forgettable season may be over. The Marlins' three-time All-Star shortstop suffered a setback on the rehab trail with his balky left shoulder Tuesday and it doesn't sound good. He had an MRI Wednesday and the results are coming Thursday, but Joe Capozzi of the Palm Beach Post reports that "indications are [Ramirez] won't be back this year." Capozzi also noted surgery is very much a possibility.

Ramirez entered the season as a 27 year old with expectations of being among the best players in baseball. If fantasy baseball is your thing, you know Ramirez was a consensus top five overall pick due to his power-speed combination. It turns out, Ramirez has to qualify as one of the biggest busts of the season. He entered the season with career triple slash line of .313/.385/.520. This season, it's .243/.333/.379. From 2006-2010, Ramirez averaged 112 runs, 25 homers and 39 steals a season. This season he's sitting at 55, 10 and 20, respectively. The numbers are injury shortened, to be sure, but he's just fallen short across the board in 2011.

With the Marlins moving into a new stadium for 2012, Ramirez needs a huge bounce-back. He's too intregral to the ballclub's success to disappoint.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com