Tag:Adam Lind
Posted on: May 11, 2011 10:12 pm
Edited on: May 11, 2011 10:19 pm
 

Lind improving; could be in lineup Friday

By Evan Brunell

LindFantasy owners and Blue Jays fans will be pleased to hear that Adam Lind may be avoiding the disabled list and could return to the lineup as early as Friday. Lind has been a potent part of the Jays' lineup, as Matt Snyder detailed Tuesday. "He's hitting .313 with seven home runs, 27 RBI, 19 runs and an .858 OPS," Snyder writes. "He was especially locked in the past two weeks, having hit .400 with six home runs and 15 RBI in his last 15 games before the injury."

Toronto was expecting to take a step back this year in a retooling phase, but the club is now tied for third place in the East with a 17-20 record. 

Lind has received acupuncture and anti-inflammatory medicine as he deals with a balky back. He's expected to participate in baseball activities on Thursday provided there are no setbacks from Wednesday which could include hitting in a cage. The Jays have so far opted to keep Lind out of the DL because the injury is muscular, and can subside quickly.

"The encouraging thing all along was that there was nothing neurological, so structurally all the medical reports were favorable," manager John Farrell told MLB.com. "We felt like once the spasm released there was a good chance he could respond and get back in action fairly quickly."

It's rather unlikely Lind will play Friday; that's just too aggressive a turnaround from his first day of baseball activities. Still, Lind turning the corner is a positive sign and he could be ready to play during the weekend.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 
Category: MLB
Posted on: May 11, 2011 12:57 am
 

If Lind hits DL, Snider will not receive call

Snider

By Evan Brunell


If Adam Lind is forced to go on the 15-day disabled list with a sore back, don't expect Travis Snider to head back to the majors. 

Snider was demoted at the end of April to work on his swing after a poor start to the season. While he's turned things around with a .425/.511/.525 line in 47 plate appearances with four doubles, general manager Alex Anthopoulous says the 23-year-old is not ready for a return to the majors.

"Travis is making strides," Anthopoulos told MLB.com. "I had a long talk with our Las Vegas staff, and [hitting coach] Chad Mottola was very encouraged.

"I asked him the same thing anybody would ask me: 'How long? What do you think?' He said, 'I don't know. It could come in a day, it could come in a week, it could come in a month.' But he's encouraged that he's really starting to incorporate some things now into the game." 

A.A. added that Snider was gracious about the demotion.

"He knew he wasn't there. At the end of the day, it's about the results, but he knew his swing wasn't where it needed to be for us," Anthopoulous said, who reiterated that Snider could have remained in the majors and hit at the bottom of the lineup, but that wasn't conducive to making Snider reach his potential as a middle-of-the-order hitter. "Even though he could survive because he's so talented, ultimately, the debate of calling guys up comes down to can they come up and survive, but are they doing it the right way?"

The Jays have been getting by with Juan Rivera and Corey Patterson becoming full-time starters, but the absence of Lind really hurts. The team has been giving first-base prospect David Cooper some playing time and while he got the season off to a slow start, he was responsible for Toronto's defeat of Boston on Tuesday night by rocketing a solo home run in the eighth that put the Jays up by one at the time. After an Adrian Gonzalez home run the next inning, Cooper delivered a walk-off sacrifice fly in the 10th.

In an ideal world, Toronto would see Juan Rivera hit the way he has been capable of in the past and then trade him in a month or two to create space for Snider. But as Anthopoulous has been clear about, Snider's not coming back to the bigs until the team believes he's ready to be a major part of the offense moving forward.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 

Posted on: May 10, 2011 10:48 am
 

Lind's achy back could land him on DL

By Matt Snyder

Things aren't going well for the Blue Jays, and they could get worse real soon. Designated hitter/first baseman Adam Lind has missed the past two games with a back injury and it doesn't appear to get responding to treatment. He reportedly has very strong spasms that won't go away. He's getting an MRI, but manager John Farrell doesn't sound optimistic for the near future.

“I think at some point in the near future we certainly wouldn’t rule it out at this point,” he said, when asked if Lind was headed to the disabled list. (Toronto Sun )

Lind has really been swinging a hot bat for the Jays -- giving them a potent two-man punch in the middle of the order with Jose Bautista. He's hitting .313 with seven home runs, 27 RBI, 19 runs and an .858 OPS. He was especially locked in the past two weeks, having hit .400 with six home runs and 15 RBI in his last 15 games before the injury.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Category: MLB
Posted on: May 5, 2011 2:48 am
Edited on: May 5, 2011 2:49 am
 

3 up, 3 down: Hudson won't play second fiddle

Tim Hudson

By C. Trent Rosecrans
 

3 upTim Hudson, Braves -- While the baseball world was focused on Zack Greinke's first start as a member of the Brewers, the Braves' starter was sort of overlooked. Not after the game. Hudson allowed just one hit in his shutout victory, a fourth-inning double to Rickie Weeks. Hudson walked Weeks with two outs in the ninth, the only walk he allowed in the game. He struck out six.

Aneury Rodriguez, Astros -- Making his first big league start, the 23-year-old Rodriguez allowed just one hit -- a triple by Chris Valaika -- in his five innings of work against the Reds at Great American Ball Park. Unfortunately for Rodriguez, closer Brandon Lyons blew a 2-0 lead in the ninth to deny him the victory. A Rule 5 pick from the Rays in December, Rodriguez had made nine relief appearances before replacing Nelson Figueroa in the rotation on Wednesday.

Adam Lind, Blue Jays -- Lind went 4 for 4 with a two-run homer in the Blue Jays' 3-2 victory over the Rays, his fourth multi-hit game in a row. He's hit in each of his last nine games, going 18 for 35 with five homers and 13 RBI in that stretch.


3 downLos Angeles Dodgers -- The team may not be able to pay its players (well, MLB will cover them, so no worries for the players), MLB vice president Rob Manfred said Frank McCourt isn't cooperating with the commissioner's office, Andre Ethier didn't play on Wednesday with a shoulder injury, Jonathan Broxton was shut down with a shoulder injury -- oh, and the team lost to the Cubs. But hey, the throwback uniforms were pretty cool (but not as cool as the Cubs').

Boston rain -- Ervin Santana had a no-hitter after five, but rain delayed the game, halting his no-hit bid. He was replaced by Rich Thompson after the rain delay of 2:35. Santana had struck out seven in four innings, walking one and hitting another. The Angels had a combined no-hitter into the seventh inning before Jed Lowrie broke it up with a single. The game started at 7:10 p.m. ET and didn't end until 2:45 a.m. ET Thursday morning, a 5-3 Angels victory in 13 innings. 

Cardinals defense -- The Cardinals had four errors in Wednesday's 8-7 loss to the Marlins. Yadier Molina, the best defensive catcher in the game, had two errors and pitcher Chris Carpenter added a pair himself.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: May 5, 2011 1:02 am
Edited on: May 5, 2011 1:06 am
 

Ump: 'We may have erred'

Joe Maddon

By C. Trent Rosecrans

It's not exactly Jim Joyce costing Armando Galarraga a perfect game, but don't tell that to Rays manager Joe Maddon.

Umpire Joe West said he "may have erred" in reversing a call in the Jays' 3-2 victory over the Rays on Wednesday.

West's explanation is a little confusing, so I'll start with describing the action first.

With one out in the seventh inning and the Jays leading 3-1, the Rays had runners on first and second and Sam Fuld at bat. Fuld hit a grounder to third, where Edwin Encarnacion fielded the ball, stepped on the bag and threw to first, where Adam Lind was pulled off the bag by Encarnacion's wide throw and tried to tag Fuld. West called Fuld safe.

Toronto's Don Wakamatsu, who was the acting manager after John Farrell was ejected earlier in the game, came out to protest and West quickly called Fuld out, ending the inning.

According to a pool reporter (via the National Post), West said second-base umpire Angel Hernandez told him he clearly saw that Lind made the tag. Hernandez also told West that Fuld had reached the base first, but West ignored that part.

"All I asked Angel was did [Lind] tag him, and Angel told me, 'I thought you had [Fuld] safe for being not he bag,'" West said. "I didn't heed that warning.

"I made the judgment based on what I had at first base. So it appears that we may have erred, but we did everything [by] protocol, right by the book. I don't know what else we could have done."

Joe Maddon came out and was promptly tossed from the game.

"If there's any particular play that screams for instant replay, it's that one," Maddon told reporters after the game. "I just don't understand how you can make that call from that distance. I don't believe you can see it properly. That was my argument."

Replays showed Fuld was likely safe -- and West was initially right that Fuld was safe and Hernandez was right that Lind did get a piece of Fuld -- even if it was after Fuld hit the bag.

In the end, Maddon's right -- replay would solve these problems and the game could have been different. A couple of years ago the umpires made a concerted effort to put their egos aside and confer more often on close calls. It was a step in the right direction, but it's about time to not just take steps in the right direction, but to reach the destination of fairness. In the end, the most important thing is getting the calls right, and it doesn't matter how that's achieved.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: April 27, 2011 1:40 am
 

3 up, 3 down: Floyd stymies Yankees

Floyd

By Evan Brunell

3 UP

Gavin Floyd, White Sox -- Floyd was masterful against the Yankees, pitching eight innings (he departed the game after giving up a single to lead off the ninth), while whiffing 10 and allowing just two runs in a win. Floyd now has a 3.60 ERA as the 28-year-old has proven himself to be a valuable -- and extremely consistent -- pitcher for Chicago after flaming out of Philadelphia. He could be poised to make a leap this year and has the Orioles next on the docket.

Adam Lind, Blue Jays -- Lind showed the Rangers what's what by bashing two home runs on a 3-for-5 outing, tallying up five RBI. It's more of the same for Toronto against Texas, as Anthony Andro noted on Twitter, given the Jays have cranked a staggering 31 home runs against Texas in the last 13 matchups. That's an insane number. It may be the breakout performance needed for Lind to get going; he has the potential to hit well over 30 home runs for the Jays but was off to a slow start before Tuesday's fireworks.

Daniel Descalso, Cardinals -- The backup infielder has gotten some additional time lately thanks to the Skip Schumaker injury and David Freese sitting out a couple of games. His offensive slash lines were rather poor, but got a boost Tuesday thanks to a 3-for-3 night with a double, triple and three RBI. He also tacked on a walk for a night that will certainly earn him a bit more playing time over Tyler Greene moving forward.

3 DOWN

Aaron Harang, Padres -- Harang was part of the featured matchup On Deck earlier Tuesday as he was going for his NL-leading fifth victory. Instead, he gave up eight runs in six innings to the slumping Braves. Harang should still benefit greatly from playing in Petco Park, but being 4-0 with an 0.88 ERA just begged for a radical fix. Now, Harang has a more believable 3.90 ERA that he should hover around all year.

Brandon McCarthy, Athletics -- OK, so maybe the Athletics didn't make out like bandits with McCarthy. Having impressed out of the No. 5 spot up until Tuesday, McCarthy was due for a course correction and got it by coughing up seven runs and 14 hits against the Angels in just 5 1/3 innings. McCarthy got dinked to death with eight singles and did not give up a home run. It remains to be seen whether this is an aberration or the regression everyone has been waiting for. History suggests the latter.

Roy Oswalt, Phillies -- Oswalt got bombed Tuesday, coughing up five runs in three innings to the Diamondbacks. The right-hander has struggled with back spasms, but reports after the game indicated that his back was not bothering him. What's with the performance, then? An interesting twist is that Oswalt, usually accessible, left the stadium without talking to reporters, much to the surprise of Phillies media writers, some of whom wondered if something was up to cause Oswalt to depart quickly. He'll certainly have some questions awaiting him tomorrow.

HONORABLE MENTION: Brett Cecil, Blue Jays -- Cecil was demoted by Toronto after showing poor velocity and getting knocked around. It was good timing for Toronto to demote him, as he was burned for 11 runs 4 1/3 innings in his first start for Triple-A. Clearly, there's something not right.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 

Posted on: April 3, 2011 8:02 pm
 

Nathan struggles, but earns save

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Joe NathanIt wasn't pretty, but it was good enough, as Twins closer Joe Nathan struggled, but still picked up his first save since Oct. 3, 2009 in the Twins' 4-3 victory at Toronto.

Nathan gave up a run on two hits and walked a pair in his inning, but got Adam Lind to ground out to first with bases loaded to end the game, earning his 248th career save.

"But it still feels like the first time when you get out there, for sure," Nathan told the Minneapolis Star-Tribine

When Nathan walked Jose Bautista, he had reached 30 pitches, more than manager Ron Gardenhire wanted him to throw.

"We're going to protect [Nathan]," Gardenhire said. "He was close to coming out of that game."

Nathan underwent Tommy John surgery last March, so the team is watching his workload. The team hopes to limit days Nathan pitches back-to-back, so he probably won't pitch on Monday in New York, with Matt Capps getting the call in a save situation.

"We've got two closers out there," Gardenhire said. "We trust both of them."

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: March 29, 2011 5:56 pm
Edited on: March 29, 2011 9:35 pm
 

Five teams to improve, five to decline in 2011

By Matt Snyder

Finally, spring training is concluding. Now we have a day or two before your favorite team begins play. In the meantime, I'm here to bring you the top five teams to decline and the top five to improve upon their 2010 performances. In return, you accuse me of bias and call me names. It's fun for everyone, really. One thing to keep in mind is that improving or declining by more than 10 games is pretty drastic. On some of these, I'm looking at something like a seven-game swing.

TOP FIVE TEAMS TO IMPROVE

1. Boston Red Sox. Well, let's see ... Last season Kevin Youkilis only played 102 games, Dustin Pedroia saw action in 75 and Jacoby Ellsbury just 18. Josh Beckett was either injured or ineffective all season. Meanwhile the Red Sox added Carl Crawford and Adrian Gonzalez to a team that won 89 games, despite all those injury woes -- and some underachieving from people like John Lackey. Easiest call on the board here, and even Yankees fans would have to concede this team is loaded.

2. Oakland A's. The pitching staff is stellar, even including the bullpen. The starting rotation is already really good and only getting better. The A's won 81 with one of the worst offenses in baseball last season. A full season of Coco Crisp, Kurt Suzuki bouncing back and the additions of Hideki Matsui and Josh Willingham don't exactly sound like adding Gonzalez and Crawford, but small improvements will do wonders for the pitching staff. Slugger Chris Carter is waiting in the wings, too, and don't be surprised if Billy Beane adds a bat at the deadline.

3. Colorado Rockies. Troy Tulowitzki needs to stay healthy and Dexter Fowler needs to get closer to his ceiling. I'm going out on a limb that both happen, along with steps forward from Chris Iannetta and Ian Stewart. Watch Jhoulys Chacin's development in the starting rotation, too. He's got big potential.

4. Milwaukee Brewers. This is contingent upon the big names staying healthy and Zack Greinke getting healthy as soon as possible, because this team is paper-thin. But the top line is very impressive. Plus, the division is not very good at all. The Brewers are going to score runs, get good starting pitching (again, assuming the health thing) and have a good back-end of the bullpen. If they can overcome defense and depth deficiencies, they'll win the Central.

5. Florida Marlins. Call it a bit of a gut call, but I really like the Marlins. The rotation really has great potential with Javier Vazquez returning to a pitcher's park in the NL East (he's apparently too intimidated by being a Yankee) and Ricky Nolasco having the ability to be a true No. 2 if he can ever stay consistent. Anibal Sanchez and Chris Volstad have -- again, this word -- potential to be solid at the end, with stud Josh Johnson leading the five-some. I love the outfield potential of Logan Morrison, Chris Coghlan and Mike Stanton, so long as all three can stay healthy. Hanley Ramirez is primed to have a big season, too.

TOP FIVE TEAMS TO DECLINE

1. San Diego Padres. Removing Gonzalez from the middle of the batting order changes the complexion of everything. And Mat Latos is already hurt, which does nothing to alleviate the concern of the huge workload increase he's experienced over the past two seasons. Most of all, the Padres just seem outmanned by the Giants and Rockies. Winning close to 90 games seems outlandish. Of course, many people said that last year, too.

2. Houston Astros. They overachieved in a big way last season according to run differential (the 'Stros allowed 118 more runs than they scored) and aren't any better. Other than Hunter Pence, the position players are either getting old (Carlos Lee), still unproven (Brett Wallace) or just not that good (Jason Michaels, Bill Hall, Michael Bourn). I'm not a huge fan of the rotation, but it's going to have to carry the team. Good luck with that.

3. Tampa Bay Rays. This is difficult. It's hard to not love the Rays for being so good at sticking with the Yankees and Red Sox in the mighty AL East on that paltry payroll. The loss of Crawford hurts. Carlos Pena wasn't overly productive -- though he was much better than his batting average said -- last season, but his presence helps everyone else see better pitches. That goes away with Dan Johnson at first. The loss of Matt Garza isn't a big deal, so long as Jeremy Hellickson does his thing and James Shields returns to form. The bullpen is worse, though. Look, I'd pick the Rays to win the NL Central if they were in it, but the Yankees aren't any worse and the Red Sox are way better. The Orioles should be better as well. I think the Rays win in the ballpark of 86 games, but that's 10 worse than last year and good for third place.

4. Toronto Blue Jays. They're still building and are moving in the right direction, but winning 85 games again in that division is a very tall order. Any offensive bounce-back from the likes of Aaron Hill and Adam Lind is negated by Jose Bautista's return to this planet.

5. St. Louis Cardinals. If anyone can pull this off, it's Dave Duncan, but losing Adam Wainwright was a death blow. Chris Carpenter is old and injury-prone. Jaime Garcia is due a massive regression. Kyle Lohse was awful last year and Jake Westbrook doesn't have good stuff. Kyle McClellan could very well prove a solid No. 5 starter, but he hasn't exceeded 75 2/3 innings the past three seasons in the bullpen. Can he really double that and remain effective? The outfield defense won't do the staff any favors, either. The Pujols/Holliday/Rasmus combo -- and even Lance Berkman in a best-case scenario -- is very solid, but there's only going to be so much they can do on some nights. I feel like mid-to-high 70s in wins, but Duncan and Tony La Russa find ways to make people wrong often.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com