Tag:Alex Rios
Posted on: August 1, 2010 10:28 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 12:28 pm
 

Trade market still open


Adam Dunn Everyone refers to the last day of July as the "trade deadline" even if it's not exactly accurate. It's officially the "non-waiver trade deadline" and that first part may not roll off the tongue, but it's important. It's the reason why one of the most speculated-about players at the deadline, Adam Dunn, told me July 31 "doesn't mean [anything]" to him.

Dunn should know, in the last year of a two-year deal, Dunn's movement will be speculated upon throughout the next month. He also knows from experience, two years ago the Reds traded him to Arizona after the non-waiver trade deadline.

Waivers are certainly a complication, but deals still get done until the end of the month, when a player has to be on the roster to be eligible for the postseason. So how does it work?

First, most teams put most -- if not all -- their players through the waiver process since you don't have to give up a player who is claimed, you can just pull him off waivers.

Unclaimed players can be traded to any team. Claimed players can be kept, traded or just handed over to the claiming team for nothing but salary relief. That's what happened last year when the Blue Jays put him on waivers, the White Sox claimed him and Toronto was happy to shed his remaining five years for $59.7 million on his contract. So, if some team wanted to claim Carlos Zambrano or Kosuke Fukudome or Alfonso Soriano, the Cubs would likely dance for joy. But that's unlikely to happen (even though I would have said the same thing a year ago about Rios).

Now, if just one team claims a player, he can be dealt only to that team. If more than one team claims a player, he can be traded to the team with the worst record in his league that claims him. If no team in the same league claims the player, but more than one team in the other league claims him, he can be traded to the team with the worst record.

So now with the process out of the way, it's good to keep in mind that this isn't an unusual process. Last season Scott Kazmir, Jim Thome, Carl Pavano, Alex Gonzalez, Brad Penny, Aubrey Huff, Billy Wagner, Jon Garland and Ivan Rodriguez. So who could that be this year?

Obviously, Dunn is still out there. He realizes the real trade deadline is at the end of this month, not the beginning. If the Nationals can't agree to an extension, the Nationals need to get something for Dunn. Based on many of the rumors that were out there, it was hardly surprising he wasn't dealt. Nationals GM Mike Rizzo was asking for the moon and nobody was willing to spend the money to get there. White Sox GM Kenny Williams hasn't exactly hidden his desire for Dunn, and a little thing like waivers won't stop him. However, he'll have to hope nearly the rest of the teams pass on the big man, and that's not likely.

The biggest name that could move would be Manny Ramirez. The Dodgers don't know what they're going to get out of him and could shed roughly $7 million. As CBSSports.com senior writer Scott Miller notes , Ramirez has a full no-trade clause, but would likely waive that to go to the American League and DH. If the White Sox can't get Dunn, Ramirez may be a solid backup option -- albeit a bit expensive.

Andy LaRoche Diamondbacks first baseman Adam LaRoche has a mutual option for 2011 that increases to $9.5 million if he's traded, though the buyout remains at $1.5 million. Kelly Johnson may not get through waivers, but could still be traded. He's arbitration eligible after the season.

The Royals would certainly love for another team to take Jose Guillen and what's left of the $12 million salary for this season. Guillen is a free agent after the season.

Mike Lowell is still -- sorta -- with the Red Sox, but would likely sail through waivers because he's owed the remainder of his $12 million salary this season and nobody's quite sure what they'll get out of him.

The reliever market didn't see much action on Saturday, but Toronto's Kevin Gregg, Seattle's David Aardsma and Colorado's Joe Beimel could be moved before the end of this month.

As for starters, Colorado's Aaron Cook is signed for $9.25 million next season with a mutual option of $11 million in 2012 and a $0.5 million buyout. His annual salary increases by $1 million for each season.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Posted on: July 17, 2010 5:13 pm
Edited on: July 17, 2010 5:14 pm
 

Orioles to keep an eye on waiver wire


The Orioles will be watching the waiver wire carefully, the Baltimore Sun 's Jeff Zrebiec reports . Team president Andy MacPhail told Zrebiec the Orioles could pluck a high-priced veteran from the waiver wire, much like the White Sox grabbed Alex Rios from the Blue Jays last year.

"A claim would be something that would definitely be attractive," MacPhail said. "The trade for a big-time player, if it's going to subtract from the core guys you are trying o build around, that becomes problematic. It's something you obviously would have to look at."

Most teams put players on the waiver wire to see fit hey clear. If not, they'll either pull them back, work out a trade, or like the Blue Jays last season, be happy for some other team to pick up a heavy contract.

It would be an interesting, gutsy move for a team like the Orioles, who have several needs to fill.

As for their trade talks, Zrebiec hears talks between Baltimore and Philadelphia regarding Miguel Tejada and Ty Wigginton "are dead," quoting a source as saying the Phillies are content with Wilson Valdez at second base until Chase Utley is ready to return.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Posted on: July 11, 2010 4:26 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:20 am
 

Quentin going homer happy

Carlos Quentin Somebody needs to bottle whatever has gotten into White Sox slugger Carlos Quentin this week.

Quentin hit two homers, including a grand slam, in the first five innings of Saturday's game against the Royals. He has 10 multi-homer games in his career, and three of them have come in the past four games.

Quentin's first homer came as the White Sox absolutely unloaded on Royals spot starter Anthony Lerew, who stepped in when defending Cy Young winner Zach Grienke was a late scratch with shoulder stiffness.

Chicago hit four homers in a seven-run third inning against Lerew: a two-run shot by Alex Rios, a Quentin solo homer, a three-run shot by Andruw Jones (his 400th career homer) and a solo shot by Dayan Viciedo.

Entering Saturday, Quentin was batting .240/.342/.500 with 17 homers and 56 RBIs.
-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


 
 
 
 
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