Play Fantasy Use your Fantasy skills to win Cash Prizes. Join or start a league today. Play Now
 
Tag:Carlos Carrasco
Posted on: June 18, 2011 5:17 pm
Edited on: June 18, 2011 5:48 pm
 

On Deck: Scoreless streakers face off



By C. Trent Rosecrans
 

Paul MaholmCarlos CarrascoSomething has to give: Pittsburgh's Paul Maholm and Cleveland's Carlos Carrasco enter Saturday's matchup with scoreless innings streaks -- 15 1/3 for Carrasco and 13 for Maholm. Maholm hasn't allowed a run in three of his last four starts, including seven scoreless against the Mets on Monday and a shutout against the Cubs on May 28. Carrasco has been a good omen for the Indians during a rough streak, winning his last two starts as the team has struggled. He's won five of his last six starts, allowing two runs or fewer in four of those starts. Pirates at Indians, 7:05 p.m. ET (Follow live here)

Dan HarenHaren ready to hit: Much of the time when interleague play comes around, the thought of American League pitchers getting their chance at the plate is a joke. Maybe not so much for the Angels, as Dan Haren takes the mound -- and his spot in the lineup -- on Saturday at Citi Field in New York. When Haren was traded from the Diamondbacks to the A's last season, he was hitting .364/.375/.527 -- good for an OPS+ of 136, including a homer in 57 plate appearances. Oh, and he's also 6-4 with a 2.54 ERA this season. Haren's gone at least six innings in all of his starts, but has been burned by poor run support. Since improving to 4-0 on April 17, Haren has allowed two rearmed runs or fewer (going at least 6 2/3 innings each time) five times with just an 0-1 record to show for it. That's something Mets starter Mike Pelfrey can identify with. He's allowed two or fewer earned runs in four of his last six starts, going 0-1 in those games. Angels at Mets, 7:10 p.m. ET (Follow live here)

Rubby De La RosaWandy RodriguezRubby vs. Wandy: While most will remember Rubby De La Rosa and Wandy Rodriguez for their unusual first names, the two add up for a pretty strong pitching matchup. Rodriguez, the Astros' lefty, came off the disabled list on Monday to pitch six scoreless innings, allowing just two hits and four walks in a victory against Atlanta. The Dodgers rookie right-hander left his last outing after five innings with a forearm cramp, but still picked up the victory over the Rockies. In two starts, De La Rosa is 2-0 with a 3.60 ERA, striking out 10 and walking eight in 10 innings, while allowing seven hits and four earned runs. Astros at Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. ET (Follow live here)

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 14, 2011 2:19 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Pence's streak to 23

Hunter Pence

By C. Trent Rosecrans
 

Hunter Pence, Astros -- A day after sitting out his first game of the season because of a lower back injury, Pence extended his hitting streak to 23 games with a third-inning homer. He added another two RBI in the fifth on a single, giving him 50 driven in this season and stopping the Braves' six-game winning streak.

Carlos Carrasco, Indians -- Carrasco struck out seven while allowing five hits and three walks in seven shutout innings, earning the win in the first 1-0 game at new Yankee Stadium. Carrasco worked out of bases loaded jam with no outs in the first and never looked back. He improved to 6-3 and ended the Indians' four-game losing streak. The Indians have won just two games in their last 11, both Carrasco starts and 1-0 finals.

Ryan Dempster, Cubs -- The Brewers had looked unbeatable of late, but the team couldn't figure out an old nemesis in the Cubs' Dempster. Making his 45th appearance against Chicago and 23rd start, Dempster lowered his ERA against Chicago to 2.50, throwing seven shutout innings, allowing just four hits and striking out seven. He is now 6-0 with a 1.83 ERA in his last eight starts against the Brewers, but didn't pick up the victory, which went to Jeff Samardzija in the Cubs' 1-0 victory.


John Tumpane, umpire -- The home plate umpire for the Tigers and Rays may have helped keep Detroit in a tie for first place in the American League Central. With bases loaded and one out in the seventh, Rays left fielder Justin Ruggiano tried to tag up on Casey Kotchman's fly to right. Magglio Ordonez threw a strike to catcher Alex Avila, who had the plate blocked. The throw beat Ruggiano and Avila blocked it, the only problem was he didn't tag Ruggiano until after the runner touched the plate. Manager Joe Maddon was ejected for arguing the play. The Rays scored in the eighth inning to tie the game at 1, but the Tigers went on to win in the 10th, 2-1.

Ricky Nolasco, Marlins -- The Diamondbacks recorded nine runs (five earned) on eight hits and four walks off of starter Ricky Nolasco in just three innings. The Diamondbacks scored nine before the Marlins secured their second hit. The Marlins finished with a season-high 16 hits (including 10 with runners in scoring position), but the hole was too big to find their way out, losing 12-9 to Arizona. The Marlins finished an 11-game homestead with just one win.

Dee Gordon and Aaron Miles, Dodgers -- Gordon made several highlight-level plays on Monday, but botched a routine grounder by Reds catcher Ryan Hanigan to start the seventh inning. Paul Janish tried to help his fellow shortstop out by hitting a tailor-made double play ball to third, but Miles' throw bounced into the photo well, putting Janish at second. Bronson Arroyo followed with a game-tying single and then reliever Matt Guerrier walked Brandon Phillips and gave up a long homer to Joey Votto, setting up a 6-4 Reds victory.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 13, 2011 7:20 pm
Edited on: June 13, 2011 11:45 pm
 

Jeter Watch: Leaves game after hit No. 2,994

Derek Jeter

By C. Trent Rosecrans
 

Derek Jeter has left the Yankees' game against the Indians after flying out in the fifth inning. Jeter seemed to limp as he ran to first and was immediately left the team's dugout to be examined by trainers. He was replaced by Eduardo Nunez in the top of the sixth. The Yankees announced he left the game and has been diagnosed with a Grade 1 strain, the lowest level of strain. Yankees manager Joe Girardi said, "Yeah, I'm worried about it." CBSSports.com senior writer Danny Knobler was at the game and has more from Yankee Stadium here. Jeter led off the bottom of the first Monday with a sharp single to left off Indians starter Carlos Carrasco, giving him a total of 2,994 hits for his career. Jeter needs six more hits to get to 3,000. The team finishes its series against Cleveland tonight before starting a three-game series with the Rangers at Yankee Stadium.

MONDAY: 1 for 3.

HITS TO GO: 6

ALL-TIME LIST: Jeter will stand at 28th until he ties Roberto Clemente at 3,000.

NEXT UP: Girardi said he doesn't expect Jeter to play on Tuesday against the Rangers. If he does play, Jeter has had more success against Rangers starter Alexi Ogando than most, with two hits in five at-bats plus a walk in just six overall plate appearances against Texas' reliever-turned-starter. Both of Jeter's hits against the right-hander are single, but there's no shame in that, as hitters are slugging just .288 off Ogando and hitting .188. Jeter singled and walked in two plate appearances against Ogando in last year's playoffs and singled in three plate appearances on April 17 of this season.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: June 8, 2011 1:06 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Carrasco steps up for Tribe



By Matt Snyder

Carlos Carrasco, Indians. The reeling Indians brought a five-game losing streak into Tuesday night's game against the Twins -- who had won five in a row. The Tribe had lost 10 of 13 and were clinging to the AL Central division lead by 1 1/2 games over the Tigers. It was a lead that was seven games as recently as May 23. Someone needed to step up, and Carrasco did just that. He threw 8 1/3 shutout innings, allowing only three hits and one walk while striking out six. He did this with no margin for error, as the Indians only scored one unearned run.

Edinson Volquez, Reds. Volquez was demoted to Triple-A for two starts after showing few signs of life in the early-going. Tuesday, he looked like his old self, aside from the absence of the dreadlocks. While he got into trouble a few times, Volquez came through with a really good start. He gave up consecutive doubles in the second and then allowed the Cubs to load the bases, but he left them that way. It was smooth sailing after that, as Volquez didn't allow any Cub to reach second base again. He finished with five strikeouts in seven innings while allowing seven hits, two walks and one run.

Dee Gordon, Dodgers. While Gordon's actual debut came Monday night when he pinch ran late in the game, his first big-league start was Tuesday and he had one to remember. The son of "Flash" is actually the speedy one in the family and gathered his first career stolen base in the fifth inning. The final line was 3-5 with a run and stolen base. The Dodgers got the win, too, so it had to be a pretty satisfying night for Gordon.




Freddy Garcia, Yankees. As bad as the outing was, in which Garcia gave up four runs on four hits and three walks (though one was intentional) and took the loss, the worst part was he couldn't even get through two innings in the first game of a series. There's a full week of action ahead for the Yankees and the bullpen was needed for 7 1/3 innings. That's the kind of strain that can catch up in the next few games. Fortunately for the Yanks, they got a Yeoman's Effort from young Hector Noesi, who got through six innings with 71 pitches. Still, he's now going to be unavailable for the next several days and Garcia shortened the bullpen with his terrible outing. The Yankees now need a deep start from A.J. Burnett Wednesday.

Delmon Young, Twins. On a Carlos Santana double in the fourth inning, Delmon Young misplayed the ball, allowing Santana to take third base. He then scored on a ground out and the Indians won 1-0. We don't know how the game would have turned out if Young didn't commit the error, but that's the problem, no?

David Hernandez, Diamondbacks. The Arizona setup man entered Tuesday with a 1.65 ERA and 31 strikeouts in 27 1/3 innings. Unfortunately this is what can happen with one awful outing for a relief pitcher: Hernandez blew up his own ERA in one night. Worse yet, he blew the game. He was summoned with a 5-3 lead in the bottom of the eighth at Pittsburgh and the Pirates torched him for five runs on four hits. Hernandez didn't even record a single out. He faced six batters, allowing three doubles, a single, a walk and a fielder's choice in which every runner was safe. The ERA now says 3.29.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: May 11, 2011 5:33 pm
Edited on: May 11, 2011 5:36 pm
 

On Deck: David Price, AL-best Indians battle

Price
On Deck

By Evan Brunell


BEST GAME: Plenty of storylines here. The Indians will see the return of Carlos Carrasco to the rotation, as he returns to a 4.97 ERA in five starts and will battle the surging Indians who still haven't made believers out of anyone -- and now that Grady Sizemore just might be hobbled by yet another injury, who knows where the Indians will go from here? David Price is hoping that Cleveland can only go down despite going 7-3 in its last 10 games as Price chases his fifth win on the backing of his 3.26 ERA. Rays at Indians, 7:05 p.m. ET (Watch iive)

PEAVY'S BACK: Jake Peavy will make his season debut as the White Sox look to avoid going 14-24 against the Angels, who will counter with rookie Tyler Chatwood. Chatwoord is actually an intriguing rookie, but it's clear that he's not quite ready for prime time yet and the suddenly surging Chicago offense could be in for a big day. Meanwhile, Peavy will hope that his unique surgery keeps him on the mound for the rest of the season. Peavy's last rehab start came Thursday for Triple-A when he coughed up five runs in seven innings (all the runs scoring in the third), but tossed 71 of 100 pitches for strikes. White Sox at Angels, 10:05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

ONE MUST GO UP, ONE MUST GO DOWN: OK, so not necessarily, but probably. Hiroki Kuroda and Paul Maholm will do battle with strikingly similar ERAs, which gets less and less rare the later the season goes on. Kuroda is 3-3 with a 3.69 ERA and Maholm 1-4 with a 3.68 mark. The Pirates are hoping to get back over .500 after losing their one-game edge Tuesday night in a Dodgers rout. Meanwhile, L.A. needs a win to pull within two of .500. Maholm has a hill to climb, as he's never beaten the Dodgers and hosts a career 5.65 ERA in seven starts. Dodgers at Pirates, 7:05 p.m. ET (Watch live)

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 
Posted on: March 11, 2011 6:04 pm
Edited on: March 11, 2011 6:29 pm
 

3 up, 3 down: Ruben Amaro's best, worst moves

Amaro

By Evan Brunell

Now that Charlie Manuel is in the books with a two-year extension, the Phillies are turning to Ruben Amaro, the GM that has steered the club to two consecutive playoff berths after replacing Pat Gillick. Philly.com reports that Amaro's own extension is "lacking just the finishing touches."

That begs the question: what has been Amaro's best and worst moves to date? For all of the machinations that Amaro has done -- some of which were head-scratching -- it's impressive that there were a litany of candidates for Amaro's best moves, but aside from one painfully obvious move, none of his worst moves are truly terrible.

3 UP

1. Welcome to Philadelphia, Cliff Lee! (And welcome back.)

At the trade deadline of 2009, Ruben Amaro pulled off a trade that cemented Philadelphia as a team to be feared. Lacking a clear ace, Lee predictably became a monster in the NL and helped lead Philadelphia to a second straight NL pennant. While Lee would be traded in the offseason (we'll get back to this), the impact he had on the club was immeasurable. 

Even better is that Ben Francisco came along for the ride and provided an excellent bat off the bench as backup outfielder -- and now may be poised to open the year as the starting right fielder after a hot spring. In fact. Francisco may make this deal look even better if and when he finally settles in as a full-time player. Don't forget that he received a ton of playing time in Cleveland and showed he was capable of being a solid starter.

All the club gave up was Carlos Carrasco, Lou Marson, Jason Knapp and Jason Donald. Carrasco looks like a fungible back-of-the-rotation pitcher while Marson shows no aptitude for hitting and figures to have a lengthy career as a backup catcher -- not a  player to miss. Donald, meanwhile, has been getting all the playing time he can handle and doesn't look any better than a second-division starter best used as a utility player. Knapp could be the player that pays the deal off for Cleveland, but even he's in doubt with his checkered injury history.

Also counted in this category is bringing Lee back to town. While trading Lee to the Mariners ended up being a mistake, every ounce of credit is deserved by Amaro for being unafraid to tactically admit a mistake. After claiming Lee simply wanted too much to resign, they bounced him to Seattle and then opened the checkbook to bring him back and got a steal by convincing Lee to ink a five-year deal. While the average annual value of the deal is higher as a result (with a total value of $120 million), the Phillies did very well to only lock themselves into five years.

2. What's up, Doc?

Amaro wasn't done spinning blockbuster deals for starting pitchers, as he would bring in Roy Halladay five months later to be the new anchor of the team. All Halladay did in his first NL season was toss a perfect game against the Marlins and stifle the Reds during Game 1 of the NLDS with a no-hitter. He nailed down a Cy Young Award with a 2.44 ERA in 250 2/3 innings, posting a Lee-ian 7.30 BB/K ratio. In addition, Halladay did so while agreeing to a three-year, $60 million pact with a fourth-year option. Philadelphia had told Halladay they did not want to go beyond three guaranteed years, something they clearly changed their mind on with Lee, but regardless, they locked Doc up to a sweetheart of a deal.

So why does this rank below Lee? Simple: This time around, Amaro gave up a pretty decent package to snag Halladay. Kyle Drabek has already made his major-league debut and there is already talk of Drabek hitting 200 innings pitched in his first full season once 2011 rolls around. You can't project Drabek to be another Halladay, but the Jays did well to get a replacement for the top of the rotation. They also snagged outfielder Michael Taylor who was sent to Oakland for Brett Wallace. While Taylor bombed in Triple-A for the A's, he still remains a solid prospect worth watching. Wallace would later be dealt to Houston for center fielder Anthony Gose, a player the Jays had tried to get included in the Halladay deal that Amaro shipped away in the Roy Oswalt trade. Lastly, Toronto netted Travis D'Arnaud, who ranked No. 61 on CBSSports.com's Top 100 Prospects list and could be Toronto's catcher for a very long time.

But make no mistake about it: the Halladay deal was fantastic for Philadelphia, especially because Amaro clearly recognized the window of opportunity for Philadelphia to win was now, with well-established players capable of winning a World Series. Sure, these players Amaro dealt away could have helped the Phillies extend their winning window, but there are no guarantees of the future, plus Philadelphia still improbably has a strong farm system after decimating it in the Lee, Halladay and Oswalt trades.

3. Signing Chan-Ho Park

Yes, I couldn't think up a clever title for this one. But signing Park to a one-year, $2.5 million deal ended up paying off big time when Park was finally convinced to vacate the rotation in favor of the bullpen. By the time the South Korean arrived in Philadelphia, he had been a top starter for the Dodgers, a massive bust who made millions of dollars in Texas, rebuilt his value in San Diego, missed an entire year as a member of the Mets, then returned to L.A. and turned heads with his production out of the bullpen.

However, Park still wanted to start. Amaro granted his wish, but after seven disastrous starts in which Park put up a 7.29 ERA, he was exiled to the bullpen where he instantly became a weapon. In 50 relief innings, Park went on to whiff 52 and walk 16 while posting a 2.52 ERA. Unfortunately, that would be Park's only (so far) season in Philly as he insisted on another crack at the rotation. He would eventually go to the Yankees where he experienced bad luck, then returned to his strong self as a reliever in the nether regions known as Pittsburgh. Park will pitch in Japan for the 2011 season where, presumably, he will get his wish to start.

It may have just been one year, but the production Amaro received out of Park was invaluable in the march to the NL pennant. Not all successful moves are of the blockbuster variety. In many cases, it's the smaller, unheralded pieces that end up being crucial.

Phillies

3 DOWN

1. He did WHAT?

Yes, Ruben Amaro signed Ryan Howard to a massive five-year, $125 million deal in April, virtually a full two years before the deal will kick in. Who thought this was a good idea?

Howard was a fantastic player before 2010, but was entering his age-30 year. As someone who had a late start to his career and doesn't appear that he can hold up well thanks to old-people skills (tied up in walks and power), any slippage of Howard's power reduces his value significantly.

And that's what happened in 2010, as he hit "just" 31 home runs and 23 doubles. But hey, five triples. Howard will begin his massive deal at age 32, and it's hard to fathom anyone giving him five years and $125 million as a 32-year-old, even if he rebounds with a strong year. In addition, it's not as if Philadelphia got a discount. They could have easily waited a year and then locked Howard into the deal. This was just completely unnecessary and will unfortunately become known as a disastrous deal.

2. Driving off a Cliff (Lee)

Yes, Cliff Lee is Amaro's 1 and 1A best moves of his tenure, but trading Lee away continues to be a head-scratcher, doubly so given Lee's return as a free agent. Of course, hindsight is 20/20, so what was the issue at the time?

Simply put, Lee was expected to command a huge extension and the overtures that Amaro/Philadelphia made were rebuffed. It doesn't appear that any thought was given to a deal that eventually ended up bringing Lee back, but that's purely speculation. What we do know is that the price Lee was thought to be commanding influenced the trade. In addition, Amaro wanted to restock the farm system after the initial Lee and Halladay deal.

But that's where he went off course, agreeing to import Phillippe Aumont, Tyson Gillies and J.C. Ramirez for Lee. And simply put, none of these players appear to have the ceiling of the prospects Philly surrendured to get Lee. Aumont is a reliever who may never reach the majors, Gillies is a speedster with a questionable bat and questionable off-field issues and Ramirez is a mildly intriguing prospect. This is one trade that, from the day it was consummated (not unlike the Howard contract) was panned, and not just because of the concept behind the deal, but the return as well.

3. Jumping the gun on Ibanez

When Raul Ibanez was inked to a three-year, $31.5 million pact the day after Christmas of 2008, many didn't quite understand the deal, but it wasn't thought to be terrible. That changed quickly, as that was the offseason that the market corrected itself and many players were frozen out until well into the new year. If Ibanez had waited just a couple more weeks, he would have easily seen his market drop to no more than two guaranteed years, and it's unlikely he could have commanded $10 million per year.

Ibanez kicked off 2009 with an absolutely silly .309/.367/.649 mark in 289 plate appearances, but upon returning from a left groin strain, it was an entirely different year as Ibanez finished the drive with a .232/.326/.448 line, but he ended up with a ring. Last season, Ibanez continued where he left 2009 off, finishing with a .275/.349/.444 mark and 16 home runs -- lowest since 2004, when he also had 16, and also his lowest as a full-time starter. Couple that with his defense and inability to hit left-handed pitchers and Ibanez isn't quite living up to his deal as he enters the final year.

However, this is one deal that stood up better than most expected when it was signed. And if this is only Amaro's third worst move, he's doing fairly well. But that Howard contract...

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb  on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.


Posted on: September 3, 2010 5:31 pm
 

Looking ahead at Indians 2011 rotation

Fausto Carmona It's possible the Indians' rotation could have five new faces in it for 2011.

Granted, Fausto Carmono would have to be traded, Justin Masterson sent to the bullpen, Carlos Carrasco back to Triple-A and even then that leaves Mitch Talbot to deal with.

Regardless, the 2011 Indians rotation has the potential to be drastically different than the five pitchers who logged the most starts: Masterson, Carmona (pictured), Talbot, Jake Westbrook and David Huff.

Huff seems to be on the outs as the organization has soured on him, plus his 6.21 ERA is rather unsightly. Masterson has struggled against left-handed batters and may be better suited to the bullpen, where he will move to shortly as he approaches his innings limit. While Masterson may be better suited in the bullpen, the Indians have so far refused to make that official switch with manager Manny Acta saying Masterson "will be sent home as a starter," reports Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain Dealer .

Then there's Carmona, who is just 26 and locked up to a deal through 2011 plus affordable club options through 2014. That made him a hot commodity at the trade deadline, and even though Carmona can log plenty of innings for the Indians in that time frame, the fact remains the Indians are one-to-two years away from even thinking about contending. Carmona is one of the team's remaining valuable trade assets, so bet on Cleveland heavily considering moving him.

The last member with a lot of starts is Mitch Talbot, who got the year off to a promising start, posting a 3.99 ERA in 17 starts, but the second half has been full of injuries and regression to the mean. Oh, and did I mention he has a 6.03 ERA at home and 2.86 mark on the road? Not exactly the model of consistency you're looking for out of a starter.

So what will happen in 2011? The guess here is that recently recalled Carlos Carrasco will find himself with a rotation spot after a successful Triple-A stint, with Talbot and Masterson joining them. Talbot is a young, cost-controllable righty who can at the very least soak up innings, while Masterson and the organization needs to come together and find a pitch to get lefties out with.

Another rotation spot will likely go to one of Jeanmar Gomez, Aaron Laffey or Josh Tomlin. Assuming Carmona is moved, the final spot would go to to a veteran right-hander who signs a deal after finding the free agent market chilly. Could that mean the return of Kevin Millwood?

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .

Posted on: August 23, 2010 11:07 am
Edited on: August 23, 2010 11:09 am
 

Indians could expand to six-man rotation

Justin Masterson The Cleveland Indians might have a different look in their rotation come September.

Not only may the team head to a six-man rotation, but they may bounce Justin Masteron to the bullpen, according to the Akron Beacon Journal .

"Justin Masterson will probably meet his innings requirements by the second week of September,” manager Manny Acta said. "We want to limit him to about 180 innings, but he doesn’t have to get every single one of them. If we bring up a starter, Masterson could finish his innings out of the bullpen."

Masterson's future is probably out of the bullpen regardless as his first full season as starter has not gone well. He has a 5.33 ERA in 25 starts, struggling against left-handers (who have an .850 OPS against). As he showed with the Red Sox, he could be a real late-inning weapon out of the bullpen, facing just right-handers. Perhaps this is the beginning of that conversion in Cleveland.

To replace Masterson, the Indians will likely tab Carlos Carrasco, who was part of the package for Cliff Lee in 2009's trade to Philadelphia. The 23-year-old has a 3.77 ERA in 24 starts, punching out 127 in 143 innings and limiting his walks to 45. He could eventually emerge as a mid-rotation starter for the Indians.

As for who else could jump into the six-man rotation, Sheldon Ocker of the Beacon Journal says that while David Huff is an option, the team clearly isn't enamored of the left-hander. Some of it may be the Twitter incident Huff found himself in, some may be Huff's production. In 15 early starts, the 25-year-old went 2-11 with a 6.21 ERA. While he isn't wild, he makes it far too easy for the hitters to jump on his offerings and can't seem to translate his minor-league results to the bigs.

If not Huff, the team could turn to Anthony Reyes, currently winding his way back from Tommy John surgery. Reyes, acquired from the Cardinals in midseason 2008, impressed down the stretch for Cleveland before getting 2009 off to a horrible start and going under the knife. Now 28, Reyes still has the chance to become a solid starter but is likely to have the bullpen in his future.

Reyes recently had a setback in mechanics in his return, as Acta noted to the Beacon Journal .

"He's been going through some mechanical adjustments," Acta said after Reyes coughed up seven runs in one inning in Triple-A on August 11. He walked six and gave up just one hit. "This is nothing physical,'' the manager added, saying that Reyes would take the mound again August 30 most likely. Barring any setbacks, he's expected to join the big-league staff.

-- Evan Brunell

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com