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Tag:Dayn Perry
Posted on: March 6, 2012 5:58 pm
Edited on: March 6, 2012 6:37 pm
 

Will the National League adopt the DH?

David Ortiz

By Dayn Perry

Might the designated hitter rule, which has led to wars, mass divorces and religious schisms, be making its leisurely way to the National League? Sports Illustrated's Tom Verducci quotes a highly placed baseball source who believes just that: "I would be shocked if 10 years from now there's not a DH in both leagues."

As for Bud Selig, he offers up a denial couched in a non-denial: ""At the moment there is no conversation about [the NL adopting the DH] . . . That doesn't mean it won't happen," the Commissioner tells Verducci. "I've always said it would take something of a cataclysmic event to get that done. Geographic realignment would be such a cataclysmic event."

The DH was born on April 6, 1973, when Ron Blomberg of the Yankees stepped in against Boston's Luis Tiant (he walked!), and the rule has been a firebrand ever since. Although the DH is used at most levels of organized baseball, remaking the NL in the AL's image has always been a bridge too far for purists. Some say it's not real baseball, and others, although the evidence doesn't support them, say the NL is at a disadvantage in the World Series and in interleague road games. 

​Under Selig, however, blurring the lines between the leagues has been the norm. In recent years, he's instituted interleague play and brought each league office under the aegis of MLB, thus stripping the NL and AL of much of the autonomy that had defined them for years. 

It's doubtful Selig will still be commissioner by the time there's a serious push to make the DH -- he tells Verducci as much -- but considering how much power he's accrued, it's a near certainty that the next commissioner will largely abide by the Selig Way. The opposite path to uniformity -- getting rid of the DH in the AL -- is an impossibility since the MLBPA would never agree to such a change. Indeed, it may be a simple matter of time before the DH at last barges into the senior circuit.   

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Posted on: March 5, 2012 3:37 pm
Edited on: March 5, 2012 3:54 pm
 

Crawford out for Opening Day?

Carl CrawfordBy Dayn Perry

Boston's Carl Crawford, who's been the subject of much New England angst, struggled last season in large part due to lingering wrist injury. So it was with a mounting sense of dread that Crawford on Monday subjected his wrist to probing physicians and their scary instruments. The news, as WEEI’s Rob Crawford reports, is somewhere between “bad” and “good.” He tweets:
Crawford shut down another 5-7 days. Valentine said Opening Day not likely.
At this point, an overly conservative time-table and “baseball activity” schedule is probably called for. The Sox need vintage Crawford; they don’t need the compromised Crawford of 2011.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS feed and "like" us on Facebook.

Posted on: March 5, 2012 3:04 pm
Edited on: March 5, 2012 3:44 pm
 

The Pujols revolution will not be televised

Albert Pujols

By Dayn Perry


Freshly minted Angel Albert Pujols is in the lineup and batting third today. One would think that Pujols's Los Angeheim debut would make for some compelling afternoon television, but, as Cork Gaines of Business Insider notes, no one in a position to do so--not FOXSports West, not MLB Network, not ESPN, not even MLB.tv--is broadcasting what's surely the most notable game of the day. And the people say: Lame.

Our programming masters cannot, however, stop us from wondering aloud what we can expect from Pujols this season. Last year, he showed some patterns of decline, but the Angels, given the breadth of their investment, are hoping that was but a blip. Was it?

For a glimpse of the future, FanGraphs has a nifty round-up of what the various forecasting systems are expecting from Pujols in 2012. The most pessimistic is the Marcel system, which forecasts a .298/.384/.549 batting line out of him with 32 homers and 31 doubles. On the other end of the continuum, there's Bill James, who expects Pujols to hit .316/.414/.591 with 41 bombs and 40 doubles. Quite a bit of variance there, as you can see.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS feed and "like" us on Facebook.




Posted on: March 5, 2012 2:03 pm
Edited on: March 5, 2012 2:40 pm
 

Pineda's Yankee debut in books

Michael PinedaBy Dayn Perry

The Yankees' most ballyhooed offseason addition, right-hander Michael Pineda, has made his pinstripe-y spring debut. While early spring outings aren't terribly illuminating, it's safe to characterize Pineda's afternoon as "so far, so good." In two scoreless, Pineda fanned two, walked none and surrendered only one hit--a leadoff single to Jimmy Rollins. At one point, Pineda served up six consecutive swinging strikes to Shane Victorino and Jim Thome.

Best of all, YES Network's Jack Curry tweets that Pineda used his fledgling changeup often and to great effect. Going forward, that'll be important for Pineda, who'll need an effective change piece to neutralize the opposite side in Yankee Stadium.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS feed and "like" us on Facebook.


Posted on: March 5, 2012 1:25 pm
 

Boston abuse story gets worse

By Dayn Perry

The revolting story of former Red Sox clubhouse manager Donald J. Fitzpatrick has devolved into what the Boston Globe's Bob Hohler calls "the worst sexual abuse scandal in Major League Baseball history." Holher reports:

"Eight more men have made sexual abuse allegations against former Red Sox clubhouse manager Donald J. Fitzpatrick, in what has become the worst sexual abuse scandal in Major League Baseball history.

The eight men, including two former batboys for the Baltimore Orioles, have come forward since two former Sox clubhouse attendants accused Fitzpatrick in December of sexually abusing them as teenagers at Fenway Park. The allegations, when added to similar allegations levied decades ago, bring to 20 the number of men who have accused Fitzpatrick of molesting them between the 1960s and 1990s."


Fitzpatrick has passed on, and, as Hohler notes, the statute of limitations has expired on most of his crimes. No matter how the legal proceedings play out, stories such as this one necessarily don't end well.

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Category: MLB
Posted on: March 5, 2012 12:36 pm
Edited on: March 5, 2012 12:50 pm
 

Suit against Wilpons clears hurdle

By Dayn Perry

The Wilpon family, owners/saboteurs of the New York Mets, suffered a courtroom setback today, report Terri Thompson and Michael O'Keefe of the New York Daily News:

A federal judge in Manhattan ruled Monday that the contentious and highly public battle between the owners of the New York Mets and the trustee overseeing the Bernard L. Madoff bankruptcy case will proceed to trial, continuing a case marred by leaks and sordid accusations that has jeopardized the ownership of the Mets for more than a year. U.S. District Court Judge Jed Rakoff refused to dismiss the suit, ruling that the trustee, Irving Picard, can proceed to trial on three counts against Fred and Jeff Wilpon and Saul Katz and their partners in Sterling Equities and can claim as much as $83.3 million in “fictitious profits” without a trial.

The Wilpons, whose Madoff entanglements have already whittled down the family fortune, are already pawning off ownership stakes in the team, so it goes without saying that they can't afford a such a pricey judgement against them. On the other hand, anything that puts the House of Wilpon on the log flume out of Queens is probably good news for beleaguered Mets fans.

UPDATE: Adam Rubin tweets that this might not be entirely bad news for the Wilpons.

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Category: MLB
Posted on: March 5, 2012 12:04 pm
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Posted on: March 5, 2012 11:08 am
Edited on: March 5, 2012 11:32 am
 

Andrew Cashner throws rather hard

Andrew CashnerBy Dayn Perry

Andrew Cashner, the 25-year-old right-hander and former Cubs first-rounder who was dealt to the Padres this offseason as part of the Anthony Rizzo swap, may yet fulfill his substantial promise. He was legendarily stingy with the home run coming up through the minors, and he boasts a fairly devastating fastball-slider combo. And then there's this: on Sunday, Cashner had a relaxing, just-stretching-the-legs, easy-breezy sort of outing against the Mariners that consisted of (apologies for the forthcoming all-caps, but it's justified) THROWING 10 FOUR-SEAMERS THAT AVERAGED 102.2 MPH.

Once more for emphasis: Cashner threw 10 pitches in his first official spring outing and averaged comfortably better than 100 mph. He topped out at 103.3, a figure that can safely be called "Aroldissian." I don't normally resort to exclamation marks, but: !.

Velocity, of course, isn't everything and we're talking about a vanishingly small sample of pitches, but if this proves sustainable then Cashner is going to be something to behold in 2012.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnBaseball on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS feed and "like" us on Facebook.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com