Tag:Edgar Renteria
Posted on: July 24, 2011 1:56 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Bard helps Francona get 1,000th win

Daniel Bard

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Daniel Bard, Red Sox: The right-handed reliever notched his 24th straight scoreless inning and team-record 23rd consecutive scoreless outing. It may not have been pretty, but got the job done after loading the bases with no outs in the eighth inning of the team's 3-1 victory over Seattle. Bard got Mike Carp to fly out to left, Jack Cust looking at a backdoor slider and Franklin Guitierrez to ground out, ending the inning. Bard hasn't allowed a run since May 23 and just 11 all season (and just seven since an opening day meltdown in against Texas), lowering his ERA to 1.85 on the season. The victory was the 1,000th for Terry Francona as a manager and extended Seattle's losing streak to 14 games.

Randy Wells, Cubs: The right-hander picked up his first win since April, allowing just one run on five hits in six innings against the Astros. Wells won his first start of the season on April 4 against Arizona before going on the disabled list with a strained right forearm, missing nearly two months. In nine starts since coming off the DL, Wells was 0-3 with a 7.38 ERA and the Cubs had gone 2-7 in those starts.

Sick Reds: Neither Jay Bruce nor Edgar Renteria felt well enough on Saturday to start the Reds' game against the Braves, but both came in when needed and performed. Renteria, battling a stomach illness, was forced into action when Zack Cozart suffered a hyperextended left elbow in the fourth inning. Renteria went 2 for 4 with three RBI, the most runs he's batted in since his three-run homer in last year's World Series.  Retneria drove in the go-ahead run with a two-run double in the sixth, making it 3-2 Reds. Cincinnati would go on to score eight more, including another RBI single by Renteria in the seven-run seventh. Bruce, struggling an inner-ear problem,  was called on to pinch hit leading off the sixth and doubled off of Derek Lowe. He was immediately pulled for pinch-runner Mike Leake, who scored the team's second run of the day on Renteria's double. 


Houston Astros: How about this stat from Brian McTaggart of MLB.com? The Astros' last 27 hits have all been singles. That includes nine hits in Saturday's 5-1 loss to the Cubs and 10 hits in Friday's 4-2 loss in Chicago. Their last extra-base hit was Humberto Quintero's second-inning double on Wednesday. Houston has now lost 33 of its last 43 games.

Chad Qualls, Padres: Coming into Saturday's game in Philadelphia, Qualls had allowed just home run in 48 1/3 innings -- an intro like that tells you exactly what's coming: Qualls allowed three homers along with another hit and a walk in his 1/3 inning of work in the Phillies' five-run seventh inning. Michael Martinez's three-run shot broke a tie, and then Ryan Howard and Chase Utley also took him deep in the inning to give Philadelphia a nice cushion in an eventual 8-6 victory. Philadelphia has now beaten San Diego in nine straight contests.

Corey Patterson, Blue Jays: Patterson came into the game as a defensive replacement in the ninth inning, but misplayed Michael Young's drive to right, allowing the winning run to score with two outs in the ninth inning of Texas' 5-4 victory. Toronto reliever Marc Rzepczynski came into the game in the ninth with a 4-3 lead and walked Mike Napoli before committing a throwing error on Mitch Moreland's bunt attempt. Jon Rauch replaced Rzepczynski, but the Rangers had back-to-back sacrifice bunts to tie the game and set up Young's game-winner. On Young's liner, Patterson got turned around twice and let the ball bounce off the wall, allowing Craig Gentry to score easily from third.

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Posted on: June 10, 2011 9:35 am
Edited on: June 10, 2011 2:57 pm
 

Pepper: Bautista's 'slump'


By Matt Snyder


BASEBALL TODAY: What does the managerial change in Oakland mean? What can you expect from Carlos Zambrano tonight? Danny Knobler joins Lauren Shehadi to discuss those topics and even the NBA Finals on Baseball Today. Click on the video above to check it out.

WORRY ABOUT BAUTISTA? Talk about something I didn't expect to read. Jose Bautista's in a slump. He hasn't hit a home run in -- gasp! -- 11 games. He's 12 for his last 38 (.316). I guess that counts as a slump, considering what he was doing to the baseball before the homer drought.

"I didn't expect to continue to be doing what I was doing the whole season. That would have been pretty hard. I'm working on getting back to where I was." (Sportsnet.ca)

He was amazing and is still compiling an amazing season. He still leads the majors in runs, home runs, walks, average, on-base percentage, slugging percentage and OPS. He's still on pace for 51 home runs. I think I'd need a stretch worse than 12 for 38 before I started to worry.

HITTING STREAK ALERT: I guess it's about time to start paying attention, because Hunter Pence of the Astros has a 20-game hitting streak.

EXTRA EXTRAS: Having to stay up and make sure every game is over before going to bed, I thought maybe it only seemed like a ton of extra-inning games this season and I just never noticed before. I was wrong. There have now been 111 extra-inning games so far this season, which is the most ever at this point in the season. At this pace, the 2011 season will shatter the record. (Bob Nightengale via Twitter) I guess it's another sign of league-wide parity, but I feel like the low-scoring games helps, too.

BAY'S DAYS OFF: Mets outfielder Jason Bay is getting two days off to work on his swing. (MLB.com) It's hard to blame manager Terry Collins, because the Mets should be trying just about anything at this point. Bay hasn't had a hit in 23 at-bats. He's hitting .207 with a dreadful .279 slugging percentage in 164 plate appearances.

"It's a very difficult thing to do," Collins said. "He's proud. He's a pro. He's a star player. And when you're struggling, it's difficult."

Bay is in the second year of a four-year, $66 million contract, so he's not tradeable and the Mets are stuck with him for two seasons after this one. That's why they'll continue to try anything to get him going. In 2009, before the Mets signed him, Bay hit 36 home runs and had 119 RBI for the Red Sox.

In a possibly related tidbit, Adam Dunn sat out two games this week for the White Sox and then homered in his return to the lineup Thursday night.

MAGIC OPERATION: Joba Chamberlain's Dad believes that Tommy John surgery will restore Joba to dominance. “Pitching as well as he has with the ailment, I can only, from a positive perspective, look at it being repaired — and you’re talking about ’07 again,” Harlan Chamberlain said (NYTimes.com). I guess if Joba's been hurt the whole time since then and mishandled along the way -- with the switching between starting and relieving -- it's possible. He wasn't all bad this season before the injury (2.83 ERA, 1.05 WHIP). But that '07 season, man, was he lights out. He threw 24 innings and allowed just 12 hits and one earned run against 34 strikeouts.

MAYBIN BACK MONDAY: Padres center fielder Cameron Maybin is on the disabled list with an inflamed knee, but will go on a rehab assignment this weekend with Triple-A Tuscon. If everything goes well, he'll be back in the Padres' lineup at Colorado Monday. (Follow The Padres)

LOPEZ TO FISH: Talk about a fall from grace. Former All-Star Jose Lopez has been signed to join the New Orleans Zephyrs in Triple-A (Zephyrs Twitter) -- the Marlins' affiliate -- at age 27. He was recently cut by the Rockies after hitting .208 with two home runs and a .233 on-base percentage in 129 plate appearances. Feels like a low-risk signing in hopes of catching lightning in a bottle. In a best-case scenario, Lopez starts hitting like it's 2009, and provides an offensive upgrade at second (and maybe even third, if Greg Dobbs starts hitting like he did in '09-'10). At least until prospect Matt Dominguez is ready.

RENTERIA'S RING: Edgar Renteria finally got his World Series ring Thursday evening, as he returned to AT&T Park as a member of the visiting Reds. He was reportedly emotional and said his Game 5 home run "is still with [him] every day." I'm guessing it's with Giants fans, too, and will be forever. (Extra Baggs)

ROUGH DEBUT: Dodgers prospect Jerry Sands was demoted to Triple-A last night after his first stint in the majors. It didn't go very well, as Sands hit .200 with two home runs, 17 RBI, 10 doubles and a .622 OPS. The good news is he's still only 23. There's plenty of time to get things figured out in the minors, regain confidence and come back to hit the ball well. His promotion may have been a bit quick, as he'd only logged 10 Triple-A games.

WHITHER FIGGY: Chone Figgins has completely fallen apart since joining the Mariners as a free agent after the 2009 season. Fangraphs takes a look at some similar declines in recent years.

RECKLESS TWEETING: The Nationals selected Zach Houchins in the 15th round of the draft this past week. Apparently they either didn't get a look at his Twitter account -- which has since been deleted -- or don't mind some of the bigoted remarks he made. For Love of the Nationals has a few screen grabs. I will never, ever understand how people can be so stupid with Twitter and Facebook. You've got to think things through before sending something that virtually anyone can see.

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Posted on: May 4, 2011 1:27 pm
 

Rolen return delayed; Renteria may play 3B

By Evan Brunell

RolenScott Rolen won't be coming off the disabled list on Friday, the first day he is eligible, as he still has yet to start baseball-related activities -- with one exception.

"I took about five unauthorized swings," Rolen said as he relayed a story of trying to sneak in some swings with the bat lately. During a recent game, Rolen snuck into the batting cage behind the home dugout in the middle of the game. "It was a covert operation," Rolen explained to MLB.com. "I snuck in, looked around -- nobody. I went around the back way and had a bat in there, dragged it with me, no batting gloves, nothing, and a ball was already on the tee. [I heard] 'I thought we weren't going to do that.' It was [Dr. Tim] Kremchek of all people. I haven't even swung yet. I told him this place is bugged."

And that's been the extent of Rolen's rehab from a strained left shoulder. His slow going has pushed Rolen toward pursuing acupuncture as a potential relief method at the suggestion of Kremchek. Rolen had been struggling with tight muscles in his neck and back as a result of the strained shoulder, but that appears to be letting up.

"I'm feeling better," Rolen said." I have more motion in my shoulders. I can feel this stuff [between his neck and back] letting go a little bit. It's giving me some range of motion and some relief."

Miguel Cairo has been Rolen's primary fill-in, but has received some rest lately as age and general soreness is catching up to the utility infielder. Shortstop Paul Janish has shifted over to third to help fill the breach, but manager Dusty Baker is hoping to give Edgar Renteria some starts at third. Renteria has no career games at third and just three games at second and one at first -- no starts -- in his career. The rest of his games, all 2,038 of them, have come at short. Renteria was supposed to start at third Monday, but Baker reversed course and slotted him at short before the game was rained out. Tuesday, Renteria manned shortstop, so his third base debut has yet to come.

"I know I don't feel comfortable there yet," Renteria said Tuesday. "It's different between playing and taking ground balls. Maybe I will like it when I play there."

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Posted on: May 4, 2011 12:44 pm
Edited on: May 4, 2011 1:09 pm
 

Who could Giants go after for shortstop?

Reyes

By Evan Brunell

The Giants' shortstop crisis has taken another turn toward utter disaster.

With the injuries to Mark DeRosa and Pablo Sandoval, S.F. has thankfully moved a slumping Miguel Tejada to third base, which improves the defense at shortstop even if his bat remains a complete zero. In lieu of Tejada, Mike Fontenot has stepped into the breach, but Fontenot remains a bench infielder with 20 career games experience at short -- seven this year.

Even when DeRosa and Sandoval return, allowing Tejada to slide back to short, the Giants need to find a better replacement, which will have to come via trade. But who?

Jose Reyes: The Mets' Reyes has been a popular link given the shortstop's perceived availability. An impending free agent, Reyes is showing how he can impact a game when healthy, but can the Giants afford both what it would cost in a deal for Reyes, plus what it will cost to retain him? CSNBayArea.com reports that while Reyes' name has been kicked around internally, that's as far as it's gotten so far. Helping matters is that the Mets wouldn't ask for any of the Giants' current starting pitchers, which has constantly eroded trade talks elsewhere. New York would focus on San Francisco's better prospects, like pitcher Zack Wheeler, outfielder Gary Brown or shortstop Ehire Adrianza. 

Problem: The Giants already have a franchise-record payroll in the $120 million range, and Reyes' pro-rated $11 million salary would have to be absorbed with no guarantee of retention after the year. And retention could be a problem, as reports surface that Reyes will ask for a deal similar to Carl Crawford's seven-year, $142 million pact. Without Barry Zito and Aaron Rowand on the team, maybe S.F. could foot the bill, but a deal of that magnitude is likely not feasible. Compounding matters is that GM Brian Sabean will not trade top prospects for a "loaner," as CBSSports.com's Danny Knobler reports. Makes sense, and is the right idea.

ESPN's Buster Olney counters this, saying Reyes could be convinced to stay with a solid multi-year offer. If Reyes agrees to a deal that pays him $15 million, the Giants could find the funds for 2012 by the expiring deals of Tejada, De Rosa and Cody Ross. The team could then start Brandon Belt in right or left-field, with Pat Burrell returning for another year in the outfield or a similar low-cost solution found. Both Aaron Rowand and Aubrey Huff's deals expire after 2012, which would then really free up cash for San Fran, so it's still entirely possible the Giants go after Reyes. Still, it's a big enough stretch financially and what type of talent would have to be surrendered that one has to question if it's the right call.

Marco Scutaro: That could cause the Giants to explore alternatives, and Scutaro is one known to have come up in Giants circles. Scoot is making just $5 million on the year and the Giants would hold a $6 million club option if it wished to keep the infielder around another year. With Jed Lowrie's emergence in Boston, Scutaro is certainly available despite his ability to function as utility infielder. The Red Sox have depth down in Triple-A for that role, so if they can find a fit, would not hesitate to move their 2010 starting shortstop.

The Red Sox wouldn't require a top prospect in return for Scutaro, so a fit could be easier reached. The Red Sox could pursue bullpen options or settle for acquiring a blue-chip prospect. This is the most likely outcome: Scutaro fits the Giants' budget, holds potential 2012 value and has a motivated seller.

Maicer Izturis / Erick Aybar / Alberto Callaspo: The Angels love their infield depth, and it's been a major help so far. Still, if and when Kendrys Morales returns to first base, someone has to hit the bench. That won't be Howie Kendrick, who is currently batting No. 3 in the order and in the process of breaking out. That leaves one of the three mentioned as bench candidates. At that point, the Giants would be interested in one of the three. Aybar is the one whose job appears most secure, although he's the worst hitter to date. Callaspo is in the midst of a hot streak but is falling back to earth and has only 32 games played at short in his career. That leaves Izturis, who is in the middle of his own hot streak and the one who has consistently been the bench player of the group, although it could be Callaspo this season.

But a fit is less clear. The club can't justify asking for one of San Francisco's best starting pitchers and there's no obvious fit on offense. It's tough to imagine the Angels agreeing to trade for a prospect to sacrifice that quality infield depth.

Jack Wilson / Brendan Ryan: When the Mariners finally promote Dustin Ackley to man second, it will relegate a good fielding, no-hit shortstop to the bench. Take your pick in Jack Wilson or Brendan Ryan. Either can easily go, and Seattle wouldn't put up too much of a fuss in the return price. While Marco Scutaro would represent the best investment both from a financial and production perspective, acquiring one of Wilson or Ryan remains the most likely outcome simply because the price would be lower for one of the two. Plus we need the humor of the sad-sack Pirates' double-play combo in Wilson and Sanchez being reunited on the World Series-defending club.

There are other options too, but they're hardly anything to get excited about. Ronny Cedeno, Cesar Izturis, Angel Sanchez, or even a return engagement by Edgar Renteria would fill a gap, but nothing more.

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Posted on: February 21, 2011 10:38 am
Edited on: February 21, 2011 10:39 am
 

Morning Pepper: The next indy-ball major leaguer?

De La Rosa

NEVER GONNA GIVE YOU UP: Dane De La Rosa's eventual destination of Port Charlotte took years to accomlpish, but the 28-year-old finally arrived after flaming out of the Yankees organization, selling real estate and playing independent baseball for four seasons.

"It's a great feel-good story," Rays director of minor-league operations Mitch Lukevics said of De La Rosa and his path back to relevancy that has him poised to follow in the footsteps of Scott Richmond and Robert Coello as ex-indy players who fight their way to the majors. But first, De La Rosa had some growing up to do.

"I felt like I belonged there, which is not the mindset you need to have when you're there," De La Rosa said of his time in New York in which he appeared in just 20 games over the 2003-04 season. "You need to be humbled. Going through all this has made me a humble person, so I don't regret it at all."

De La Rosa headed to independent baseball after the Yankees cut him, but he struggled to adjust and then took a year off to sell real estate. However, his dream wouldn't die and he couldn't handle knowing his baseball career was over, so he returned to the independent leagues.  His play in 2007 got him a late-season pickup by the Brewers, but all he got was one two-inning stint at the rookie level before being released.

But after two more years in the independent leagues, De La Rosa finally caught the attention of the Rays, who brought him in for a workout. Tampa witnessed a 6-foot-5 righty with a fastball reaching 97-mph and immediately signed him.

"He was pounding fastballs, and we were thinking this is too good to be true," Lukevics said. De La Rosa would go on to split the year between high-Class A and Double-A, posting a 2.01 ERA in 76 innings and whiffing 80 while coughing up 26 walks. Now, he has a chance to win a bullpen spot in the major leagues after being placed on the 40-man roster, news that came just weeks after becoming engaged. That's a lesson in the art of perseverance.

"If Dane De La Rosa has taken this journey and now he's on the 40-man major-league roster and a heartbeat away from pitching in the big leagues," Lukevics said, "it tells every young man, every player they have a chance if they keep working." (Tampa Tribune, also source of photo)

PARTY TIME: Brian Wilson is sure one lucky guy. He was picked up in Arizona by none other than Charlie Sheen on a private jet and ferried to Sheen's house, where he hosted yet another party. This one was full of ballplayers watching movies and kicking back. (And yes, Sheen's iconic Major League was played, capping off the night.) Sources said the party was only "R-rated" instead of the debauchery that usually happens at the Sheen estate.

No word on whether Wilson's virtual doppleganger attended the festivities. (TMZ)

A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME: Pete Rose joined a fundraiser for a Legion team and had plenty of jokes to crack even as there was the requisite talk about Rose's gambling and Hall of Fame chances. "This is America. You're supposed to get second chances," Rose said. "I chose the wrong vice." Or maybe his second chance was frittered away when he lied about gambling? Anyways, cool anecdote: Rose would always leave four tickets per game for his father, who would move seats every time Rose didn't get a hit. One day when Rose went 0-for-4 and didn't hustle (imagine that) on a grounder to second, his father castigated him.

"He asked me, 'Did you run hard in your third at-bat with the runner on third?'" Rose relayed. "I thought about it and I realized I hadn't because I thought I should've gotten a hit, and I grounded out to second."

His father's response: "'Don't embarrass me in this town. You run until the umpire says safe or out.'" (Oroville Mercury-Register)

LONG TIME NO SEE: When the Pirates traded Jason Schmidt back in 2001, they were hoping the return would put them on the path to respectability. Instead, Armando Rios got hurt and Ryan Vogelsong posted a 6.00 ERA from 2001-06 after rocketing through the Giants' system. But now, Vogelsong is finally back in San Francisco after stints in Japan and Triple-A for the Phillies and Angels last season. 

Before Vogelsong picked the Giants, the Dodgers came calling, but the righty stayed true to his roots. "I was like, I just can't wear Dodger blue," he said. (MLB.com)

PRIDE COMES BEFORE A FALL: Edgar Renteria isn't upset that the Giants declined his $10.5 miliion option (an obvious move, he says) but the resulting $1 million offer was disrespectful, he says. "I'm not going to play for anybody for $1 million," Renteria said. "I'd rather retire. That is why I say it [was disrespectful]. It's because I know what I can do in this game."

Renteria eventually signed for $2.1 million with the Reds. Meanwhile, if being offered $1 million is disrespectful, sign me up. (San Jose Mercury News)

REST IN PEACE: Cardinals co-owner Andrew Baur has passed away at the tender age of 66. He was a part of the 1996 purchase of the Cardinals by majority owner Bill DeWitt and was a member of the board of directors since the ownership change. Cause of death is not yet known. (FOX Sports Midwest)

LITERARY GENIUS: In Sunday's Morning Pepper, R.A. Dickey revealed he was writing a book about his major-league career. It's not often you hear of ballplayers who can write -- nevermind even read -- but add Burke Badenhop to that list. The Marlin relayed a story of the judge recognizing him when he served jury duty, but that was only the start of his offseason. He also got married, assisted a friend in writing a book about financial planning and is co-writing a movie script with his agent. But now, all he's concerned about is winning a bullpen spot. (Palm Beach Post)

DHING AIN'T EASY: DHs don't get a lot of respect in the league. Not only is it virtually impossible for them to get Hall of Fame or All-Star consideration, but many believe it's pretty easy to walk up to the plate four times a game, take your hacks and then warm the bench without having to play defense. Not so, and Adam Dunn is trying to figure out how to transition to a DH role. Fortunately, ex-White Sox players in Jim Thome and Harold Baines have some advice. (Chicago Tribune)

LESSON LEARNED: It couldn't have been easy for Mike Quade to step into Lou Piniella's shoes and then make the move of benching Starlin Castro for one game, but there you have it. The budding shortstop rode the pine for a mental lapse, and the Rookie of the Year candidate has said he learned his lesson from it. Quade, however, refuses to call it discipline, rather preferring to term it a "teaching moment" to get Castro a breather after breaking into the bigs amid much hoopla and starting on a regular basis. (Chicago Tribune)

-- Evan Brunell

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Posted on: January 6, 2011 4:14 pm
Edited on: January 6, 2011 4:15 pm
 

Reds, Renteria eyeing each other

You may not want to order that Edgar Renteria Reds jersey yet. It still looks like it could happen, but sources tell CBSSports.com that the World Series MVP and the National League Central champs have yet to agree on a contract.

Reports stated the team is close to a one-year, $3 million deal with Renteria to back-up Paul Janish in Cincinnati, but the team doesn't want to pay that much. Although, a one-year contract has been offered.

Renteria would serve as a reserve infielder and bat off the bench, not as the starter over Janish. Last season Janish went into February thinking he'd start for the Reds at shortstop, only to see the team sign Orlando Cabrera before spring training started. Janish edned up starting just 43 games in 2010, hitting .260/.338/.385 -- numbers much better than expected at the plate, but was still behind the veteran Cabrera in manager Dusty Baker's pecking order.

Renteria managed to start just 62 games for the Giants, hitting .274/.333/.381, but came up big in the postseason. The lure of a "clutch" veteran option could limit Janish's playing time again. While Renteria is obviously an upgrade offensively to Janish, he is not as good defensively as the smooth-fielding Janish.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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Posted on: December 16, 2010 11:49 pm
Edited on: December 16, 2010 11:58 pm
 

Renteria 'disrespected' by Giants' $1M offer

Renteria "That offer from the Giants was a lack of respect. A total disrespect," Edgar Renteria told ESPN Deportes' Enrique Rojas on Thursday.

Renteria was speaking about the Giants' $1 million offer to be the backup infielder for San Francisco.

"To play for a million dollars, I'd rather stay with my private business and share more time with my family," he said. "Thank God I'm well off financially and my money is well invested."

(Raise your hand if you'd like to play for a million...)

Renteria just won another World Series ring with the Giants, although he missed part of the season due to injury and hit just .276/.322/.374 in 267 plate appearances with iffy defensive results.

However, Renteria was instrumental in the World Series run, nabbing the MVP award. He has considered retirement but is willing to return to San Francisco or other former teams in the Cardinals and Marlins. Florida is reported to have some interest, but it is not known whether the Marlins are the other team to offer a deal -- but the other offer wasn't to his satisfaction either.

"I have received at least another offer since I was a free agent, but it wasn't what I'm looking for to continue playing," Renteria said. "If I got a good offer, I'm playing, and if not, it's better to stay at home."

Renteria's likely staying home, because no team is going to pay a breaking down, aging player more than a million or two to backup. And to Renteria's credit, he's had a strong enough career that he doesn't have to accept any deal not to his liking.

-- Evan Brunell

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Posted on: December 7, 2010 3:57 pm
 

Giants want Renteria back

The Giants would like for Edgar Renteria to return, CBSSports.com senior writer Danny Knobler says, but they're not sure they can get a deal done with him.

Renteria said on Monday that the Giants were one of two teams to contact him this offseason.

If the Giants can't afford Renteria, they could look at Ramon Santiago to fill their need in the middle of the infield. Santiago, 31, hit .263/.337/.325 with three home runs in 267 plate appearances for the Tigers last season.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com