Tag:Hanley Ramirez
Posted on: December 16, 2011 11:16 pm
 

Marlins' Ramirez still mum about move to third

Hanley Ramirez

By C. Trent Rosecrans


It sounds like the Marlins are doing everything they can to help Hanley Ramirez adjust to the thought of playing third base -- or trying to drive up the price for him by making it appear they aren't looking to trade the disgruntled former shortstop who has been pushed aside for free-agent signee Jose Reyes.

"It may take a little time for him to get comfortable" with the idea of moving, Marlins president Larry Beinfest told the Miami Herald's Barry Jackson.

Beinfest said he wouldn't divulge specifics about his discussions with Ramirez, but did note that he's talked to Ramirez quite a bit. He notes Ramirez is excited to play for new manager Ozzie Guillen, who may just have to convince him to man up and accept the move. Beinfest said it much nicer, noting Ramirez's "pride."

"Even though we communicated with him and let him know what our intentions were in terms of Jose, he was the shortstop for six years, a very good one," Beinfest said. "We've asked him to move to third. Sometimes it takes a little time for things to sink in. I think he realizes we're a better team with Jose."

It's pretty hard not to come to that conclusion. Ramirez has looked more and more like a third baseman, physically, in recent years and the 28-year-old Reyes is easily superior to Ramirez defensively -- and even if the two were equal, Ramirez is more suited to third than Reyes.

An official told Jackson that the team isn't pressuring Ramirez, but would like him to publicly announce he was willing to move, but it's still two months before pitchers and catchers report, so there's no real hurry to do so -- or hurt his feelings by pressing the situation. The team can let Guillen talk to him and slowly sell him on the idea.

One person who hasn't talked to Ramirez is Reyes.

"I think he wants to be here," Reyes told Jackson. "He wants to win. I want to win, too. Hanley is one of the best players in the game. We are very good friends. I'm going to tell him I'm very excited to play with him. I think we can be one of the best left sides of the infields in history."

The Yankees had the same problem -- if you call two superstars on one team a "problem" -- when Alex Rodriguez joined the team and deferred to the incumbent, Derek Jeter at short. That worked out, in part because one player put his ego aside (if even temporarily) to make the move. If Ramirez won't do that, the Marlins could be stuck with another pouting star and appear desperate to deal him. If they keep his pouting under wraps and remain steadfast in their public stance that he'll be fine, they get a semblance of leverage in a trade. Otherwise, he's a player without a position and an attitude problem -- both things that hurt his trade value.

In the end, it looks like this will all work out, but there's two months until anyone's actually in uniform, so this is what we have to talk about.

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Posted on: December 13, 2011 11:02 am
Edited on: December 13, 2011 12:24 pm
 

Homegrown Team: Boston Red Sox



By Matt Snyder


What if players were only permitted to stay with the team that originally made them a professional? No trades, no Rule-5 Draft, no minor or major league free agency ... once you are a professional baseball player, you stay in that organization. This series shows how all 30 teams would look. We give you: Homegrown teams. To view the schedule/past entries of this feature, click here.

One of the main reasons we came up with this exercise was because of the massive amount of fighting in the comments sections over who "buys" their teams instead of drafting and developing their own talent. In some cases, the accusations are true. In others, they aren't. While these Red Sox don't have Adrian Gonzalez or David Ortiz or Josh Beckett, you'll certainly see several key, familiar names.

Lineup

1. Jacoby Ellsbury, CF
2. Dustin Pedroia, 2B
3. Kevin Youkilis, 3B
4. Hanley Ramirez, DH
5. David Murphy, LF
6. Anthony Rizzo, 1B
7. Jed Lowrie, SS
8. Kelly Shoppach, C
9. Josh Reddick, RF

Starting Rotation

1. Jon Lester
2. Clay Buchholz
3. Justin Masterson
4. Anibal Sanchez
5. Carl Pavano

Bullpen

Closer - Jonathan Papelbon
Set up - Daniel Bard, Rafael Betancourt, Frank Francisco, Hideki Okajima
Long - Kyle Weiland, Daisuke Matsuzaka? (Not sure I could stomach that ... )

Notable Bench Players

Ryan Lavarnway, Lars Anderson, Freddy Sanchez, Engel Beltre

What's Good?

The top of the order is sick. If Hanley Ramirez had one of his good years, that's a top four that few in baseball could match. The entire pitching staff is really, really strong, too. Lester as an ace works fine and Masterson and Sanchez are pretty darn good in those slots. There was one point last season (May) when Sanchez was almost as good as anyone. Then you move into the bullpen and the back-end is what it was in 2011, with Bard and Papelbon. Here, though, we get to add Betancourt and Francisco to the mix. That's quite a bridge to Papelbon, and remember, this with a good rotation.

What's Not?

The lineup thins out quickly. It's not awful by any stretch, because Lowrie, Shoppach and Reddick are a decent 7-9, but Murphy isn't good enough to be a fifth hitter in a great lineup and we still can't be sure how Rizzo pans out. Also, there is no depth, either on the bench or in the bullpen. The onus is entirely on the main guys to shoulder the entire workload.

Comparison to real 2011

Let's avoid all the off-field crap and just focus on the issue at hand. Is this team better than the one that was in the AL playoff race until the final out of the season? The offense isn't as good, that's for sure. Most of the other spots are at least close, but the Rizzo/Gonzalez gap at first base is gigantic. Pitching-wise, though, this group is better, top to bottom. There's no Josh Beckett, but there also isn't a full season of John Lackey with mixed in Dice-K and then the spare-part injury replacements they had to use for most of the season. The real-life Red Sox won 90 games and this group feels like a similar one in terms of wins. It's not elite, but it's pretty good.

Next: Detroit Tigers

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Posted on: December 5, 2011 5:06 pm
 

'Super-professional' Ramirez to move to 3B



By Danny Knobler


DALLAS -- Once more, Jeffrey Loria said it won't be a problem. Once more, he insisted that Hanley Ramirez will accept the move to third base forced by the Marlins' signing of free-agent shortstop Jose Reyes.

Do you believe him?

"Hanley is a super-professional," Loria, the Marlins owner, said Monday. "We will work with him, make everything comfortable for him."

They won't be trading him. Loria loves Ramirez, and considers him part of the plan, part of the core. They won't, for now, be moving him to center field, although the Marlins have a need there and some opposing scouts think Ramirez would be just the guy to fill it.

He's the new third baseman, and if there was any doubt, new closer Heath Bell said out loud Monday that third base now belongs to Hanley.

Will he be happy?

Who knows, but new manager Ozzie Guillen could face his first big challenge in making it work.

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Posted on: December 5, 2011 12:10 am
Edited on: December 5, 2011 12:39 am
 

Reyes rounds out an impressive Marlins lineup

Jose Reyes Hanley Ramierez

By C. Trent Rosecrans

The winter meetings haven't officially started and the Marlins already seem to have locked up the Hot Stove League title with the signings of Jose Reyes and Heath Bell -- and they could add more.

So what does this mean to the product on the field come April? Well, the rotation may still need some tinkering, but the lineup -- assuming everyone is healthy -- appears stout.

With Reyes, let's look at the new-look Miami Marlins lineup:

Jose Reyes1. Jose Reyes, SS

When healthy, Reyes is the best leadoff hitter in the game, and one of the few real difference-makers in the top spot of the lineup. Reyes has a career .341 OBP and 370 stolen bases -- good for eighth among active players, with only one of the other players ahead of him on the list in his 20s, like the 28-year-old Reyes. Reyes is coming off his first career batting title, hitting .337/.384/.493 in 2011 and also led the league in triples (16) for the fourth time in his career. The knock on Reyes, though, is his ability to stay on the field. After playing in at least 153 games from 2005-2008, he played in just 36 games in 2009, 133 in 2010 and 126 last season. But when healthy, few in the game are as good as he is.

Omar Infante2. Omar Infante, 2B

While Infante didn't return to his All-Star form from a year before in 2011, he's a steady second baseman, if not exactly Dan Uggla. Infante hit .276/.315/.382 and led the league with 17 sacrifices if you're into that kind of thing. He has a career .318 OBP, but had a .353 OBP from 2008-2010 with the Braves. He's a solid No. 2 batter, especially sandwiched between Reyes and Hanley Ramirez.

Hanley Ramirez3. Hanley Ramirez, 3B

Ramirez will have to move to third to make room for Reyes, something he's been reluctant to do -- but it's probably best for him and the Marlins. At 6-foot-3, 230 pounds, he's physically more of a third baseman than a shortstop and the team's defense should benefit from the switch. The Marlins had been in the market for a third baseman and all of a sudden they have one with a .306/.380/.506 career split with 134 home runs in six seasons -- and will be just 28 when the season starts. With Reyes and Ramirez, the Marlins now have batting champs from two of the last three seasons in their lineup.

Mike Stanton4. Mike Stanton, RF

Perhaps the most exciting young player in the game, Stanton hit 34 home runs last season in his first full season, while hitting an impressive .262/.356/.537 overall. In an era where there seems to be fewer young power hitters, Stanton has it in spades. He's also proven to be an outstanding defensive outfielder and is under team control for several more years.

Logan Morrison5. Logan Morrison, LF

Morrison, 24 had a disappointing sophomore season, even finding himself sent to Triple-A in August. Even with the trip to the minors, he put up a .247/.330/.468 line with 23 home runs and 72 RBI. That's not ideal, but it's not bad for a 23-year-old in his second season in the majors, especially one that put up a .283/.390/.447 line as a rookie. He was also much better in the first half, hitting .267/.343/.489. The talent is there and he should get better.

Gaby Sanchez6. Gaby Sanchez, 1B

Sanchez was lost in the monster National League rookie class of 2010, but still put together a solid rookie season and pretty much equaled it in his second season, hitting .266/.352/.427 with 19 home runs in 2011. Sanchez is 28, the same age as Reyes and Ramirez, but with much less experience.

Emilio Bonifacio7. Emilio Bonifacio, CF

A switch-hitter, the speedy Bonifacio played all three outfield spots, as well as second, shortstop and third last season for the Marlins, but the team's biggest need now is center field, and he can stick there now that he doesn't need to fill in at any point for Ramirez at short. Bonifacio put up a .296/.360/.393 line last season and stole 40 bases. The team also has former Rookie of the Year Chris Coghlan, who started 64 games in center last season, but struggled, hitting just .230/.296/.368 and is expected to start next season in Triple-A.

John Buck8. John Buck, C

The oldest player in this lineup, Buck is just 31. While not an offensive superstar, he's a solid catcher and did put up a .316 OBP last season and hit 16 home runs. He also hit 20 homers in 2010 for the Blue Jays.

That's a pretty good lineup, and also a young one -- only Buck and Infante will be 30 or older at the start of next season. That said, the Marlins may not be done. Jayson Stark of ESPN.com reports Miami is expected to make "an aggressive run" at Albert Pujols. As good as the Marlins' lineup looks now, that could push it into a different stratosphere. Even without Pujols, that thing in center field could get a workout at the Marlins' new park.

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Posted on: November 15, 2011 11:13 am
Edited on: November 15, 2011 12:33 pm
 

Report: Marlins make $90 million offer to Reyes

Reyes
By Evan Brunell

The Brewers need a shortstop, but it's unlikely to be Jose Reyes, who has a lucrative offer in hand from the Marlins.

"One call," Brewers GM Doug Melvin told MLB.com. "No numbers."

Reyes is one of the hottest names on the market and has already received a six-year, $90 million offer from the Marlins, Fox Sports reports. That's not likely to be good enough for Reyes to sign, as the shortstop is seeking a contract north of $100 million. However, Miami's offer is not all that far away from Reyes' magic number, so it's easy to envision the Marlins upping the price and getting Reyes, who is intrigued by the opportunity to play in Miami and under skipper Ozzie Guillen. The appeal of Miami has to do with the city, plus the ability to play in good weather which could help Reyes avoid hamstring problems that have plagued him so far in his career.

The Brewers also need a shortstop, but it's hard to imagine Milwaukee ponying up the money to sign Reyes. In a discussion about first baseman Prince Fielder a couple days ago, Melvin indicated it was extremely unlikely Fielder would return to the Brewers because of payroll constraints. The same constraints will keep Reyes out of Milwaukee.

But Melvin is still on the prowl for a new shortstop, having lunch with Rafael Furcal's agent on Monday and reaching out to Yuniesky Betancourt's agent, MLB.com writes. While Betancourt is an awful shortstop and it was a no-brainer for Milwaukee to decline its $6 million option on Betancourt after the season, at some point, beggars can't be choosers. If Melvin can't entice Furcal or another shortstop (how about Clint Barmes?) to town, Betancourt may represent Melvin's best choice.

"I would think anybody who needs a shortstop and who is a contender has to look at [Furcal]," agent Paul Kinser told MLB.com. "Like I said, he brings the intangibles. The other guys haven't won the championships. ... He might miss a few games during the year, but when he's on the field, he's a difference-maker."

Melvin, for his part, admitted the Brewers won't be part of any free agency moves early on.

"We probably are going to be late in signing players," Melvin said. "I don't know if there's bargains at the start. ... Tell me an early signing that's a good deal."

While an early signing of Reyes by Miami will force the Marlins to give up a pretty penny, it would certainly change the complexion of the team and give the club an offensive dynamo that could be the missing piece for the offense. But would incumbent shortstop Hanley Ramirez move? The Miami Herald's Clark Spencer writes that Ramirez is not pleased about the possibility of changing positions -- and that Reyes and Ramirez aren't as friendly as reports make out.

That could potentially open the door for a Ramirez trade if Reyes is signed. The Marlins' payroll can only hold roughly one big-ticket signing in order to have money to flesh the rest of the team out. But a Ramirez trade could not only help supplement the big-league team, but would free up enough money for the club to chase down its other free agent targets, thought to be Albert Pujols, Ryan Madson and Mark Buehrle.

Those wondering if Reyes could end up back with the Mets? GM Sandy Alderson said his team wasn't out of the race to resign the shortstop.

Check out CBSSports.com's free agency tracker.

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Posted on: November 14, 2011 7:05 pm
Edited on: November 14, 2011 7:07 pm
 

Rookie award may not predict future success

By C. Trent Rosecrans

The Rookie of the Year awards are unique among baseball awards in that they are somewhat less about an individual year's performance as much as they are for the hope of better things to come. A Rookie of the Year win is a footnote on any Hall of Fame argument, not a bullet point. Meanwhile, any Hall of Fame argument will start with MVP wins for position players and Cy Young trophies for starting pitchers. If you have those, you have an argument, and if you won Rookie of the Year, that's nice.

Rookie of the Year
Miller
The Rookie of the Year award voting went exactly as Scott Miller predicted.
Read>>
Related links

No, Rookie of the Year is something to dream on -- there's the potential and what a player could become based upon a solid rookie year.

Jeremy Hellickson and Craig Kimbrel may end up being the best players of the 2010 rookie class, but it wouldn't be a real shock if they don't.

With that in mind, I wanted to look back on the past Rookie of the Year winners and what players had the best careers after winning the award and which ones peaked in their first year. Because this particular argument needs time for perspective, I've broken up the last 20 years in five-year increments. Below are the winners of the awards each year for both leagues, as well as their Wins Above Replacement (from Baseball-Reference.com) for both their rookie year and their career, as well as a decision on the best player in retrospect, the worst and the best duo from one year.

 

2006-2010 Rookie of the Year
Year AL ROY ROY WAR Career WAR NL ROY ROY WAR Career WAR
2010 Neftali Feliz 2.3 5.0 Buster Posey 3.1 4.4
2009 Andrew Bailey  3.9 7.2  Chris Coghlan 2.1 2.8
2008 Evan Longoria  3.8 24.1 Geovany Soto 4.1 10.1
2007 Dustin Pedroia  4.3 24.3 Ryan Braun  1.5 21.8
2006 Justin Verlander  3.7 27.2 Hanley Ramirez  5.2 29.3

Best: This is where we need perspective -- and time. Right now it looks like you could go with any of six candidates -- Justin Verlander (AL 2006), Hanley Ramirez (NL 2006), Dustin Pedroia (AL 2007), Ryan Braun (NL 2007), Evan Longoria (AL 2008) and Buster Posey (NL 2010). In 10 years this may be easier to pick, but right now it's just way too close to call. Of the group, Ramirez has the highest career WAR.

Worst: Again, this is still way too early to call, but Chris Coghlan (NL 2009) may take this dubious honor. There's plenty of time for him to turn it around, but he finished 2011 hitting .230 at Triple-A New Orleans.

Best duo: Another toss-up -- 2006 had Ramirez and Verlander, while 2007 featured Pedroia and Braun. Check back in 10 years and this may seem to be an easier choice, but right now it's too close to call.



2001-2005 Rookie of the Year
Year AL ROY ROY WAR Career WAR NL ROY ROY WAR Career WAR
2005 Huston Street 3.2 10.7 Ryan Howard 2.4 23.1
2004 Bobby Crosby 1.4 5.0 Jason Bay  2.2 19.7
2003  Angel Berroa 4.0 3.3 Dontrelle Willis 3.7 13.0
2002 Eric Hinske  4.0 10.3 Jason Jennings 1.7 7.4
2001 Ichiro Suzuki 7.6 54.5 Albert Pujols 6.9 88.7

Best: Albert Pujols (NL 2001). He may be the best player of our generation and best right-handed hitter of all time. With apologies to Ichiro Suzuki (AL 2001) and Ryan Howard (NL 2005), it's Pujols and it's not close.

Worst: Oh, Angel Berroa (AL 2003). Acquired in the deal that sent Johnny Damon and Mark Ellis to Oakland, Berroa last appeared in the big leagues in 2009. The Royals shortstop won the award over Tampa Bay's Rocco Baldelli and Hideki Matsui, earning the scorn of Yankees owner George Steinbrenner. 

Best duo: Pujols and Suzuki would be a heck of a Hall of Fame class, not to mention a rookie class. Suzuki won not only the Rookie of the Year in 2001, he also took home the American League MVP.

 

1996-2000 Rookie of the Year
Year AL ROY ROY WAR Career WAR NL ROY ROY WAR Career WAR
2000 Kazuhiro Sasaki 1.5 4.0 Rafael Furcal 3.6 33.1
1999 Carlos Beltran  4.4 60.8 Scott Williamson  2.7 8.2
1998  Ben Grieve 2.5 6.7 Kerry Wood 3.7 24.9
1997 Nomar Garciaparra  5.9 42.5  Scott Rolen 4.5 66.2
1996 Derek Jeter 2.6 70.4  Todd Hollandsworth 1.3 6.5

Best: Scott Rolen (NL 1997) and Carlos Beltran (AL 1999) have had fantastic careers, but Derek Jeter (AL 1996) is a first-ballot Hall of Famer and a baseball icon. Jeter also has the highest career WAR among the group of rookies.

Worst: This one is tough, if you guy by WAR, it's Kazuhiro Sasaki (AL 2000), who had just a 4.0 career WAR. However, Sasaki was 32 when he started in the United States and played just four seasons in the majors. In addition to his Rookie of the Year, he made the All-Star team in 2001 and 2002, recording 129 saves in four seasons. I'm going to take Ben Grieve (AL 1998) slightly over Todd Hollandsworth (NL 1996) based solely on Hollandsworth holding on longer (12 years to nine) and finding his late-career niche as a pinch hitter, while Grieve did appear in the majors after his 30th birthday -- and just 17 after his 29th birthday.

Best duo: How about Rolen and Nomar Garciaparra (AL 1997)? Garciapparra never quite lived up to the rival to Alex Rodriguez and Jeter as the greatest shortstop of his generation, but he was in the conversation for a time there. While each year from 1996-2000 had at least one pretty good pick, 1997 was the only one to produce two players that finished with double-digit career WAR.



1991-1996 Rookie of the Year
Year AL ROY ROY WAR Career WAR NL ROY ROY WAR Career WAR
1995 Marty Cordova 3.0 6.4 Hideo Nomo 4.5 50.6
1994  Bob Hamelin 2.5 2.4 Raul Mondesi  2.2 27.2
1993  Tim Salmon 5.2 37.6  Mike Piazza 7.0 59.1 
1992 Pat Listach  4.5 3.9  Eric Karros 0.3 9.0
1991  Chuck Knoblauch 2.3 41.2 Jeff Bagwell 4.7 79.9

Best: WAR likes Jeff Bagwell (NL 1991), the Hall of Fame will like Mike Piazza (1993). Either way, it's tough to go wrong. Unlike the Hall of Fame voters, I'll take Bagwell over Piazza, but can see both sides of the argument. I"m in the camp that Bagwell is one of the more underrated players of his generation. 

Worst: Yet again, the award goes to a Royal. Bob Hamelin (AL 1994) had a 2.5 WAR in his rookie year and 2.4 for his career. Pat Listach (AL 1992) also has a lower career WAR (3.9) than single-season WAR for his rookie season (3.9), but the be speckled Hamelin did less in his career than Listach, even if most of Listach's value came from his rookie season.

Best duo: Again it comes down to the 1993 choices (Piazza, Tim Salmon) and 1991 (Bagwell, Chuck Knoblauch), with 1991 taking the crown. Knoblauch and Salmon both had good careers, with Knoblauch winning four rings and Salmon one. Knoblacuh was a four-time All-Star, Salmon never appeared in the game. Knoblauch also won a Gold Glove, despite his woes throwing later in his career. Going by WAR, the 1991 duo beats the 1993 pair, 121.1-96.7.

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Posted on: September 3, 2011 9:18 pm
 

Marlins recommend Hanley Ramirez undergo surgery

RamirezBy Evan Brunell

The Marlins have recommended that star shortstop Hanley Ramirez undergo surgery, Joe Frisaro of MLB.com writes.

Ramirez will need around 4-8 months recovery from an injury termed "left shoulder instability." He hit the disabled list at the beginning of August after injuring his shoulder on a diving play, and embarked on a rehab assignment before leaving the game Tuesday with a reaggravation. A MRI showed no structural damage in Ramirez's shoulder, but it's still unstable and slipping out of joint.

No date has been set for the surgery, but Ramirez is expected to be back in time for Opening Day, although spring training is questionable.

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Posted on: September 1, 2011 7:31 pm
 

Johnson won't start again in 2011, Hanley update

By Matt Snyder

Marlins ace pitcher Josh Johnson won't start again the rest of the season, though he's going to throw from the mound at least a few times the rest of the way, even if it's only simulated action.

“He is just getting on the mound now, and he has 27 days to get all the way ramped up," Marlins president Larry Beinfest said (Fish Tank blog). "We just want to get him on the mound, even if it’s simulated in Jupiter and just have him feel good and tell us that he feels good ... "

“You rewind this whole thing we thought it was gonna be a two-week thing and that was four months ago.”

Yes, we're coming up on four months. Johnson last pitched on May 16. All you ever heard about a timetable when relating to Johnson's inflamed right shoulder was that there was no timetable -- but they'd know more in a few weeks. And things just kept lingering and lingering. Now, it appears he'll end the season with a 3-1 record and 1.64 ERA. It's too bad, as he looked to be in prime form to contend for a Cy Young award. Instead, he's a 27-year-old veteran who has only made 30 or more starts in a season one time. He's had Tommy John surgery and this now this inflammation issue.

The other man who was expected to be a face of the franchise as the Marlins finally moved into a baseball-only facility in 2012 is Hanley Ramirez, and his season is also in jeopardy.

The update for Thursday is that no structural damage was found in Ramirez's MRI, but it's unstable as it's fallen out of socket recently. Surgery is still a possibility and the recovery time from such a procedure would be anywhere from four to eight months.

“He’s not going to be activated Friday and we need to get it taken care of. Again, we will have more clarity this weekend exactly what that means," Beinfest said (Fish Tank blog).

Considering the Marlins are going nowhere in 2011, it seems like Ramirez should just get the surgery done as soon as possible.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com