Tag:Jesus Montero
Posted on: September 23, 2011 12:10 pm
Edited on: September 23, 2011 1:19 pm
 

Yanks' Cashman faked interest in Crawford

Brian CashmanBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Not only did Brian Cashman get an iPad for pretending to want Carl Crawford, he also got the Red Sox to (in retrospect) overpay.

Speaking to ESPNNewYork.com, the Yankees general manager admitted he didn't really have any interest in the left fielder, instead, he just wanted his rivals to have to shell out more money. In the end, Crawford signed a seven-year, $142 million contract with the Red Sox.

"I actually had dinner with the agent to pretend that we were actually involved and drive the price up," Cashman told ESPNNewYork.com. "The outfield wasn't an area of need, but everybody kept writing Crawford, Crawford, Crawford, Crawford. And I was like, 'I feel like we've got Carl Crawford in Brett Gardner, except he costs more than $100 million less, with less experience."

For the $14 million that Crawford is making in 2011, he's hit .259/.295/.410 with 11 home runs, 55 RBI, 18 stolen bases and scored 63 runs. Gardner, two years younger than Crawford, made $530,000 this season and is arbitration-eligible after the season. He's hit .261/.347/.374 with seven home runs, 36 RBI, 46 stolen bases and 83 runs scored. He's also the better defensive player, so it's obvious Cashman made the right choice -- at least for this season.

Cashman said the team's pursuit of Cliff Lee, on the other hand, was very much real. Cashman also said he was ready to send catching prospect Jesus Montero to Seattle to get Lee at midseason.

"You take all the players traded when Lee went to Cleveland to Philly, Philly to Seattle, and Seattle to Texas, and Montero would've been by far the best player moved in any of those deals," Cashman told the website.

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Posted on: September 17, 2011 11:29 am
 

Yanks' Cervelli may not be available for playoffs

Francisco CervelliBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Yankees backup catcher Francisco Cervelli may not be ready for the playoffs, manager Joe Girardi told reporters on Friday. Cervelli suffered a concussion on Sept. 8 and hasn't played since. Cervelli is scheduled to visit a neurologist next week.

"I think you have to prepare that he won't be (available) only because it's so unpredictable," Girardi told reporters (via New York Daily News). "That's what's so scary because we've seen so many guys miss so much time with them, and they're still missing time. I heard (Justin) Morneau talking about when he dove for a ball at first base, the concussion symptoms came back. You just don't know what's going to happen."

Francisco CervelliIf Cervelli's unable to play in the first round of the playoffs, the Yankees will have to make a choice between two rookies to backup Russell Martin. Austin Romaine is the better defensive catcher of the two rookies, but Jesus Montero has the more potent bat. The two have combined for just 18 big-league innings behind the plate and one start apiece.

Montero, 21, is hitting .286/.359/.571 with three homers and six RBI in 39 plate appearances spanning 10 games (mostly as a DH), while Romine has one hit in four plate appearances in two games. He replaced Montero for the final three innings of Montero's one start behind the plate.

The Yankees, of course, still have Jorge Posada, who can catch, but he's logged just as many innings behind the plate as Montero this season (6), and manager Joe Girardi isn't a huge fan of Posada's skills behind the plate. If he's used as the DH, the Yankees would lost the DH if Martin were to leave a game with injury and he was the only backup.

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Posted on: September 12, 2011 10:12 am
 

Pepper: Ortiz says it's time to panic



By C. Trent Rosecrans

The Wild Cards were all sewn up -- or so we thought.

While it appeared the Braves and Red Sox would cruise to the Wild Card (or the AL East title for Boston), but in the last week, things have gotten interesting. St. Louis swept Atlanta to move just 4.5 games behind Atlanta and Tampa Bay is now just 3.5 games behind the Red Sox as Boston finished a 1-6 road trip, including being swept by the Rays.

Still, there's not a whole lot of baseball left, the two favorites are still favored by mathematicians to hold onto their leads. So it's not time to panic, right?

"Hell yeah, you've got to panic at this point, but you're not going to do anything panicking but playing better," Boston's David Ortiz told reporters (Boston Herald). "Of course you're freaked out, you go on this road trip, 1-6, it's not good. We've got these guys breathing down our next and we're not in first place, either."

Give him credit, Ortiz is always entertaining and this time he's right. The team should worry about the Rays and can't get too worked up about it because panic doesn't help a team play any better. It's an interesting balancing act, playing with urgency, but not panic. Baseball's a tough game that's even tougher when you press.

Cuddyer's homer helped save teammate: Twins outfielder Michael Cuddyer hit two game-winning homers in a minor-league playoff series in 2001 to lead his team to a victory in the best-of-five series. If his team had lost the series, teammate Brad Thomas and his wife, Kylie, had already booked a flight home to Australia. The couple would have started its journey on American Airlines Flight 11 from Boston to Los Angeles on Sept. 11, 2001. With the win, Thomas and his wife had to stay for the next series.

"He credits me for saving his life," Cuddyer told MLB.com. "I mean, I don't know about that. It was just a twist of fate."

Thomas is currently on the Tigers' 60-day disabled list.

Cuddyer also wrote about the incident on FoxSports North.

Wainwright remembers: We all have our own personal stories about where we were on Sept. 11, 2001 -- I drove from Athens, Ga., to Washington, D.C., the day before to go to see PJ Harvey at the 9:30 Club on Sept. 10, 2001. I still have the ticket stub and a September 12, 2001, Washington Post to share with my kids some day. Cardinals starter Adam Wainwright was in New York for the Red Sox-Yankees game on Sept. 10, 2001, and then cancelled a morning meeting near the World Trade Center the next day in order to get on the road to Cooperstown with his brother. [St. Louis Post-Dispatch]

Waiting on Theo: Matt touched on this yesterday, but word is Tom Ricketts is willing to wait for his dream GM, Boston's Theo Epstein. While MLB looks down on major offseason announcements before the end of the World Series, those decisions happen all the time and are usually uncovered before the official announcement. However, there is a real wait if one of those interviewed and hired is still working. That could be the case with Boston's Epstein, reportedly Ricketts' top pick. If Epstein is in the least bit interested, Ricketts will wait. [Chicago Tribune]

Beckett to throw: Red Sox right-hander Josh Beckett will test his injured right ankle in a bullpen session Monday and could return to the rotation by the end of the week -- welcome news to the Red Sox. [Boston Herald]

Weeks to go slow: Rickie Weeks returned to the Brewers' lineup on Sunday, walking and being hit by a pitch in his only plate appearances and was taken out of the game after four innings. The team plans on taking it slow with him. The Brewers are off on Monday and manager Ron Roenicke said he would try to get Weeks back into the game on Tuesday and maybe increase his innings. Weeks missed six weeks after suffering a severe left ankle sprain. [Appleton Post-Crescent]

Cruz ready to return: The Rangers are in the closest playoff race in baseball, leading the Angels by 2.5 games and they get some good news on Tuesday when Nelson Cruz says he'll be ready to return from the disabled list. Cruz went on the DL on Aug. 30 with a strained left hamstring and ran in the outfield on Saturday. The Rangers don't have any minor-league affiliates still playing, so the team will activate Cruz without a rehab assignment. [MLB.com]

Zimmermann bored sitting out: Nationals right-hander Jordan Zimmermann hasn't pitched in two weeks and won't pitch in the final two weeks of the season. The good news is that next season he won't have an innings limit. With Zimmermann and Stephen Strasburg, the Nationals have the building blocks for a very good rotation. [Washington Post]

Prado struggling: An All-Star in 2010, Atlanta's Martin Prado his having a disappointing 2011. The 27-year-old super utility player is hitting .261/.307/.385 this season, well below the .307/.356/.454 line he put up in his first five seasons in the big leagues. The prolonged slump is costing him sleep, Prado told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Romine relishes chance: While Jesus Montero garnered headlines when he was called up, the Yankees have a better catching prospect, Austin Romine. With injuries to Russell Martin and Francisco Cervelli, Romine made his big-league debut on Sunday. Romine had thought his season was over after Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre finished its season, but Joe Girardi needed a replacement and got in touch with Romine on Saturday. Girardi hadn't been able to get in touch with the catcher, so he had to go to the Angels' clubhouse to talk to Romine's brother, Andrew, an infielder with the Angles, to get a better number. Austin Romine replaced Montero in the ninth inning, catching Mariano Rivera, who recorded his 599th career save. [MLB.com]

ThunderBolts to White Sox: Just two years ago Dylan Axelrod was pitching for the Windy City ThunderBolts of the independent Frontier League. On Wednesday, he'll be throwing in the Windy City again, but for the White Sox in place of former Cy Young winner Jake Peavy. [Chicago Tribune]

Mo Coco: Reds closer Francisco Cordero is willing to re-negotiate his $12 million option for 2012 and general manager Walt Jocketty told John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer that an extension is a "possibility." Cordero, a whipping boy in Cincinnati, has had an outstanding year, recording 32 saves with a 2.30 ERA with five blown saves. Since coming to the Reds in 2008, Cordero has 145 saves and 23 blown saves, converting 86 percent of his chances with a 2.94 ERA. The Reds don't have an obvious candidate to take over in the ninth inning if they decline his $12 million option. He was the team's highest-paid player in 2011 and his $12 million in 2012 would be the tied for the team's highest-paid player along with second baseman Brandon Phillips, who also has a $12 million option for 2012 that the team is expected to pick up.

Eat before you go: We see a report like this just about every year, but it's always a good reminder -- if you want your food handled properly before you eat it, you've got to make sure to do it yourself. [CBS Chicago]

Bourjos takes blame: We all have those people we know or work with that will never admit fault -- there's always some crazy excuse or reason something went wrong, and it's never their fault, it's some extenuating circumstance. The Angels' Peter Bourjos is not that guy. His error doomed the Angels on Sunday, and instead of complaining about the sun or anything, taking full responsibility for the play that killed his team. [Los Angeles Times]

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Posted on: September 10, 2011 10:09 pm
 

Posada enters game as catcher, throws out runner

PosadaBy Evan Brunell

Prior to Saturday, Las Vegas would have refused to take a bet on Jorge Posada throwing out a runner as catcher in Saturday's game, believing that they would have been stealing the better's money. (Well, at least more blatantly then they already do.

Except that happened.

Posada was pressed into service as catcher when Russell Martin took a foul tip off his right hand, necessitating leaving the game. Backup catcher Francisco Cervelli was unavailable thanks to a recurrence of concussion symptoms, so it was left to Posada to shoulder the load. Jesus Montero, who was DHing, also put on his catcher's gear before being told to take it off. If Montero had not been starting, he likely would have subbed in but since he was the DH, manager Joe Girardi did not want to lose the DH early in the game. (A DH that takes the field then causes the DH spot to be lost for the remainder of the game, requiring the pitcher to hit.)

It was the first time Posada had caught all year. And by year, we mean it -- he didn't even take any reps in spring training.

But that's not even the most impressive thing. The first thing the Angels did when Posada entered the game was to try to run on him, but Posada threw out second baseman Howie Kendrick on a high throw to nip that in the bud.

Martin was hit by a Maicer Izturis foul tip in the second inning but remained in the game despite blood on his thumb. However, when he threw the ball into center field while warming up CC Sabathia prior to the third, he was yanked.

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Posted on: September 6, 2011 6:39 pm
 

Yankees call up another prospect

Andrew BrackmanBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Jesus Montero's debut was so successful, the Yankees have called up another prospect, right-hander Andrew Brackman.

OK, the two are not really connected except that it's a use of the expanded rosters by the Yankees to see some of their young players over the last month of the season.

Brackman was the team's top pick in 2007 out of N.C. State. The 6-foot-10 Brackman is a hard thrower who also has a good curveball, but has struggled mightily with his command -- walking 75 and hitting 14 more in 96 innings at Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. He did strike out 75 batters as well, while going 3-6 with a 6.00 ERA in 33 appearances, including 13 starts. While rated behind both right-hander Dellin Betances and lefty Manny Banuelos in Baseball America's annual prospect ratings, Brackman was fifth in the Yankees system and threw fewer innings than the other big pitching prospects.

Brackman also played basketball for the Wolfpack and underwent Tommy John surgery shortly after signing. He wa salsa slowed by an appendectomy the next season, so his professional carer didn't begin until 2009, when he was already 23.

The team also called up fellow pitchers Hector Noesi, George Kontos and outfielder Greg Golson.

The right-handed Noesi has appeared in 24 games for the Yankees out of the bullpen this season, going 2-0 with a 3.42 ERA. He was 1-1 with a 3.28 in six appearances and five starts at Triple-A this season. Baseball America ranked him the Yankees' seventh-best prospect. 

Kontos, also right-handed, appeared in 40 games for Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, going 4-4 with a 2.62 ERA and two saves. He's struck out 91 batters in 89 1/3 innings, walking 26 and hitting two.

A right-handed hitter, Golson hit .263/.330/.385 with eight home runs, 33 RBI and 15 stolen bases at Triple-A this season. He's played all three outfield spots, starting the majority of his games in center field.

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Posted on: September 5, 2011 11:43 pm
Edited on: September 6, 2011 12:49 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Jesus connects twice



By Matt Snyder


Jesus Montero, Yankees. Monday was quite a day for the Yankees' heavily hyped young slugger. The 21 year old hit his first and second career major-league home runs in an 11-10 Yankees' victory. The locals were excited enough that Montero got a curtain call after each homer. Meanwhile the Yankees opened up a 2 1/2 game lead over the Red Sox in the AL East with their fifth consecutive victory.

Doug Fister, Tigers. You think the Tigers don't have a good starting pitcher after Justin Verlander? Think again. Fister dominated the Indians for eight innings, allowing only four hits and one earned run while striking out 13 in a 4-2 win. His ERA is down to 3.17. If you insist on looking at his win-loss record (7-13), at least concede his playing for the Mariners until late July drastically hurt him.

Brett Lawrie, Blue Jays. Neither the Red Sox nor the Blue Jays scored a run through 10 1/2 innings Monday, but the Jays' rookie third baseman came through with a walk-off home run in the bottom of the 11th. He also stole a base earlier in the game as he continues to pretty much do it all for his ballclub. Though it's tough for the Blue Jays to compete with the Yankees and Red Sox in terms of payroll in the AL East, an offensive nucleus of Jose Bautista, Adam Lind and Lawrie looks pretty damn solid for the next several years.

Also take note of the efforts put forth by James Shields (click here), Cliff Lee (click here) and Zach Stewart (click here), who had big Labor Day outings in their own right.



Andrew Bailey, Athletics. He only faced four hitters in the 10th inning, but it was enough to gather the loss after giving up three hits and being charged with three earned runs while only recording one out in an 11-6 loss.

Padres offense. The Padres managed two runs against the Giants, which wouldn't normally be that bad, but it's a season-long issue that we're going to point out. Giants starter Madison Bumgarner struck out 13 while reliever Santiago Casilla struck out two as the Padres fell 7-2. It marked the 11th time this season the Padres' offense has collectively struck out 13 or more times in a game (Follow the Padres via Twitter). When power is an issue (the Padres rank dead last in the majors in home runs) and speed is a strength (the Padres are first in the majors in stolen bases), it's probably a good idea to put the ball in play as much as possible.

Twins offense. They managed one run on eight hits Monday ... in a doubleheader. The Twins also had two walks and only one extra base hit. They only left nine men on base, which wouldn't be so awful for two games, except for the fact that they only got 10 guys on base. In light of this, the 4-0 and 2-1 losses shouldn't be surprising.

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Posted on: September 1, 2011 5:01 pm
Edited on: September 1, 2011 5:38 pm
 

On Deck: AL East, West races on display

OD

By Matt Snyder

The last month could get a bit boring from a pennant race perspective. Look at the standings. The Yankees trail the Red Sox by 1 1/2 games in the AL East, so it's a good race. Of course, the loser is going to be the AL Wild Card, so it's not really a great race. And in the West, the Rangers hold a 3 1/2 game lead. But until a first-place team in the other four divisions falters or a second- or third-place team really gets hot, this is all we have. Check out our September Storylines post from my esteemed colleague C. Trent Rosecrans for more on this very subject.

So we'll check out the two currently close races in this Thursday installment of On Deck. As always, make sure to follow all the action on CBSSports.com's live scoreboard.

Jesus rises: Yes, we know the Yankees and Red Sox are playing. Prepare to see a four-hour game full of macho posturing. Not that there's anything wrong with it, as it makes for good entertainment. But the big storyline in Thursday night's game is the major-league debut of heralded Yankees catching prospect Jesus Montero. He's slotted seventh in the lineup as the designated hitter. Montero has been a top-five prospect in all of baseball each of the past two springs. This year in Triple-A, Montero hit .288/.348/.467 with 18 homers in 463 plate appearances. It was a very slight regression from the 2010 season, but Montero's still only 21. Of course, it's unlikely he's seen many pitchers with the stuff of Red Sox starter Jon Lester (14-6, 3.09), who gets the ball Thursday night. A.J. Burnett (9-11, 5.31) is tasked with holding down the Red Sox offense. Yankees at Red Sox, 7:10 p.m. ET.

Beltre's back: Rangers third baseman Adrian Beltre has been activated from the disabled list and the offense could sure use the boost. It recently lost slugger Nelson Cruz to -- shocker -- a hamstring injury and was locked down by James Shields Wednesday night. The Angels lost, though, so the Rangers maintained their modest 3 1/2 game lead. Beltre is hitting .276/.318/.505 with 20 home runs and 76 RBI in 100 games, so he'll provide some punch. Beltre and the Rangers will face Jeff Niemann (9-5, 3.46) of the Rays, while C.J. Wilson (13-6, 3.29) gets the nod for the home team. Rays at Rangers, 8:05 p.m. ET.

Ervin's Angels: The Angels dropped a heartbreaker Wednesday night. They took a 1-0 lead into the eighth and appeared ready to move to within 2 1/2 games of the Rangers, but then Mike Carp of the Mariners came through with a two-out, two-run double to help the M's win 2-1. Ervin Santana will look to get the Halos -- and kind of himself -- back on track. For a stretch, Santana was one of the best pitchers in baseball, but he's allowed 23 hits and 11 earned runs in his last three starts. He was 5-0 with a 0.84 ERA in his previous five starts. The Mariners counter with Charlie Furbush (3-6, 4.87). Angels at Mariners, 10:10 p.m. ET.

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Posted on: August 31, 2011 1:25 pm
Edited on: August 31, 2011 1:26 pm
 

Yankees' Montero getting the call to bigs

Jesus MonteroBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Not that it's much of a surprise, but Jesus Montero will be in pinstripes on Thursday, Joel Sherman of the New York Post reports.

The Yankees' top hitting prospect will be promoted when rosters expand, while top pitching prospers Manuel Banuelos and Dellin Betances will not be called up, Sherman writes.

According to the report, the Yankees feel Banuelos and Betances have thrown enough innings and pitched well enough to let them rest.

Montero, however, will be used -- and could very well impact the race for the American League East title, as Evan Brunnel wrote on Tuesday. Montero is nominally a catcher, but he's not coming up to catch, he's coming up to hit. The right-handed hitting Montero will be used as a DH. At Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, Montero is hitting .288/.348/.467 with 18 home runs and 67 RBI, but was scorching in August, hitting .308/.370/.604 with eight home runs.

Banuelos, a 5-foot-11 lefty, went 6-7 with a 3.45 ERA in 26 minor-league starts this season, throwing a total of 128 innings. He made six starts at Triple-A, going 2-2 with a 3.03 ERA, striking out 30 in 32 2/3 innings. Overall, he had 124 strikeouts and 66 walks.

Betances, a 6-foot-8 right-hander, was 4-8 with a 3.49 ERA in 24 minor-league starts. He made three starts at Triple-A, going 0-2 with a 3.94 ERA. Overall he pitched 121 1/3 innings, striking out 135 and walking 68.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com