Tag:Lou Piniella
Posted on: August 22, 2010 3:10 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 12:31 pm
 

Trammell not a candidate for Cubs gig

Alan Trammell Apparently Alan Trammell failed his audition with the Cubs.

With Lou Piniella retiring after today's game, the team has announced Mike Quade as the team's interim manager.

Quade is the team's third base coach, while Trammell serves as the bench coach. Trammell had served as the team's manager during several absences by Pinella this season. So why is Quade taking over full-time on Monday?

Because he's a candidate for the full-time gig and Trammell's not, general manager Jim Hendry told reporters (via the Chicago Sun-Times ).

"Alan's terrific and an outstanding coach," Hendry said. "The last few weeks I've made the decision Alan won't be a candidate for the managerial job. He understood. The decision I made is if he wasn't going to be the manager, we'd be better served not having him be managing the rest of the year."

Quade joined Piniella's staff in 2007 after serving as the manager at Triple-A Iowa from 2003-06.

Trammell managed the Tigers from 2003-05 and went 186-300, including an American League-record 119-loss season in his first year with Detroit.

Ryne Sandberg Trammell is similar to the person many think is the leader to take over the Cubs next season -- Ryne Sandberg.

Both were beloved players and arguably had Hall of Fame careers (Sandberg is in, Trammell is not, and there are good arguments on either side).

Sandberg is currently the manager in Iowa and leading the team to the playoffs. He's paid his dues managing, working his way up in the Cubs system from Class A Peoria in 2007, to Double-A Tennessee in 2009 and Iowa this season.

Trammell had served as a major league coach before taking over the Tigers, but hadn't managed before taking over the Tigers.

Would Cubs fans be quick to turn on one of their legends? Or would they give him the benefit of the doubt before turning on him? In the end, would it hurt his legacy as one of the team's all-time greats? If he doesn't get the job, Cubs fans may be equally upset.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Posted on: August 22, 2010 11:55 am
Edited on: August 22, 2010 12:18 pm
 

Piniella to retire after today's game

Lou Piniella Lou Piniella won't stick around to see the end of this season, the team announced Sunday morning. Third base coach Mike Quade will take over for the rest of the season.

Piniella told reporters (via the Chicago Sun-Times ' Gordon Wittenmyer's Twitter ) it was to be with his ailing mother.

"I didn't think my career would end this way, but my mom needs me home," Piniella said. "She hasn't gotten any better since I've been here. In fact, she's had a couple of other problems. To continue to go home and come back wasn't fair to the team, wasn't fair to the players. I'm going to miss it, no question about that. It was very difficult."

Here's the release from the Cubs:

Lou Piniella today announced he has elected to step down as manager of the Chicago Cubs following this afternoon’s game against the Atlanta Braves at Wrigley Field for family reasons.

“When I previously announced my intentions to retire at the end of the season, a primary reason for my decision was that it would allow me to spend more valuable time with my family,” said Piniella.  “That time has unfortunately gotten here sooner than I could have ever expected.  As many know, the several weeks since that announcement was made have been very difficult on a family level, requiring two leaves of absence from the club.  While I fully intended to manage this club the rest of the season, a family situation at home now requires my full attention. 

“As I said last month, I couldn’t be more appreciative of the Cubs organization for providing me the opportunity to be their manager.  I wouldn’t trade this experience for anything in the world and I consider this the ultimate way to end my managerial career. 

“I am thankful to the Ricketts family for their support – Cubs fans are fortunate to have an owner like the Ricketts family to lead this organization for the long-term.  I also couldn’t be more thankful to Jim Hendry for bringing me to Chicago.  We enjoyed a great deal of success together and I’ll always value the relationship we had during our time together.  Thank you to Crane Kenney and the Cubs front office for your support throughout the years.

“I couldn’t be more appreciative of my coaches and training staff.  They have been professional and supportive.  And thank you to my players for the successes we shared and their efforts.

“Finally, to the Cubs fans, thank you for four wonderful seasons.  You are the best, most deserving fans in all of baseball and it has been an honor to manage your ballclub.” 

Cubs Chairman Tom Ricketts and General Manager Jim Hendry released the following statements:

“The Chicago Cubs are honored to have had Lou Piniella as our manager for the last four years,” said Ricketts.  “My family and I respect Lou's decision to retire from the game he loves and thank him for his years of dedicated service.  He is an icon in the world of baseball and we are grateful for his time with this organization.”

“Lou helped raise the bar here for this entire organization and for that we’ll be forever thankful,” said Hendry.  “We understand he needs to be with his family and respect his decision to retire at this time.  We salute his tremendous career and wish him and his family long-term health and happiness.”

One of only five skippers to win at least three Manager of the Year Awards, including 2008 with the Cubs, Piniella retires the 14th winningest manager in major league history.  He enters this afternoon’s game with 1,835 wins in his near 23 big league seasons as a manager.  Piniella is the first Cubs manager in more than 70 years to post a record of .500 or better in each of his first three seasons leading the club.

Piniella enters his final game with the Cubs with a 316-292 record in his three-plus seasons in Chicago.  Only seven managers have won more games than Piniella in club history, while his .520 winning percentage is the best since Charlie Grimm’s .547 combined mark from 1932-38, 1944-49 and 1960 (minimum 500 games).  Piniella is the first Cubs manager in 100 years to lead the club to consecutive post-season appearances in 2007 and 2008.



-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.




Category: MLB
Posted on: July 21, 2010 4:15 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 12:30 pm
 

Sandberg: 'I am ready'

Ryne Sandberg Ryne Sandberg is apparently not going to play coy. He wants to be the next manager of the Cubs.

Appearing on a radio show in Chicago, Sandberg did not mince words when asked whether he is prepared to take over when Lou Piniella retires at the end of the year. The Hall of Fame second baseman is managing the Cubs' Triple-A team.

"I am ready. I sure am. [After] four years of managing at the minor league level, I'm ready for a major league job, and I'm ready to win," Sandberg said. "The reason I went this route was to manage, not to coach.

"There is a lot to managing, and with almost four years under my belt, I believe I'm ready. I'm not interested in on-the-job learning or on-the-job training. At this point, I'm interested in winning ballgames at the major league level."

Given the disappointment surrounding the Cubs, and his legendary status among Cubs fans, Sandberg has to be considered the front-runner for the job. But general manager Jim Hendry told reporters Wednesday that he's not rushing into anything.

"One of the advantages of the way we're doing it, and with Lou announcing that he was going to retire, is that we're going to take our time," Hendry said. "This process is going to take a couple of months. ... It will be a long and very intense search. A lot of people will be considered."

A source told ESPNChicago.com that the Cubs will interview former Marlins manager Fredi Gonzalez, who has a history with Hendry. Gonzalez has been rumored to be the favorite to replace the retiring Bobby Cox in Atlanta.

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.





Posted on: July 20, 2010 3:28 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 12:30 pm
 

Is Sandberg next Cubs manager?


Now that Lou Piniella has announced he will retire at season's end, who is next to manage the Cubs?

Paul Sullivan of the Chicago Tribune has a quick list of candidates : Ryne Sanberg, Joe Girardi, Bob Brenly, Joe Torre and Alan Trammell.

Girardi is the longest of shots, there is little reason for the former Cubs catcher to leave the Yankees for Chicago's North Side. The Cubs can't offer him more money or a better chance to win. Girardi will likely manage the Cubs at some point down the line, but it won't be in 2011.

Torre, Sullivan writes, is a real possibility. His contract with the Dodgers runs out after the season.

Brenly is in the Cubs' broadcast booth, and that job is less stressful and has a better prognosis for long-term employment. Brenly managed the Diamondbacks to the 2001 World Series title and was 303-262 in parts of four seasons. He was let go after a 29-50 start in 2004.

Trammell is the current Cubs bench coach and has managed the Tigers and is liked by Jim Hendry, Sullivan reports. Trammell was 186-300 in three seasons with the Tigers from 2003-05.

Sandberg is the likely choice. He would create excitement among an aggravated fanbase, is a Cubs legend, understands what he's getting into and has also paid his dues in the minor leagues in a way many Hall of Famers would see as beneath them.

Sandberg is currently managing Triple-A Iowa and has also managed Class A Peoria and Double-A Tennessee.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Posted on: July 20, 2010 2:20 pm
Edited on: July 20, 2010 3:11 pm
 

Piniella to retire at end of the season


Lou Piniella Lou Piniella announced his intention to retire at the end of the season.

Here's a statement released by the team:

"I couldn't be more appreciative of the Cubs organization for providing me the opportunity to manage this ballclub. I've had four wonderful years here that I wouldn't trade for anything in the world.  I've grown to love the city and the fans but at my age [67 at the end of the season] it will be time to enter a new phase in my life.  It will enable me to spend more valuable time with my family -- my wife, my kids and my grandchildren.  God has blessed me to have been able to work this many years in the game that I love.

"Why make this announcement now? Jim Hendry asked me in recent weeks regarding my future with the team and I told him I had made the decision to retire at the end of the season.  Since my decision has now been made, I don't want to mislead anyone about my intentions when asked in the future.  

"But more importantly, announcing my decision now is what's best for this organization in the long run.  It gives Jim Hendry ample time to find the next manager and he doesn't need to do so in secrecy. The Cubs are one of the greatest organizations in baseball.  I care very deeply for this organization and want nothing more than for it to experience present and long-term success.  I'm proud of our accomplishments during my time here and this will be a perfect way for me to end my career. 

"But let me make one thing perfectly clear: our work is far from over. I want to keep the momentum going more than anything else and win as many games as we can to get back in this pennant race.  I'm going to give every effort I have to help this team win and that will remain my sole focus through the rest of the season."  

An hour or so before Piniella announced the decision, Bill Madden of the New York Daily News writes reported the news without the very mention of a source or anything else to back up what is written other than "the Daily News has learned."

Piniella is 307-271 in Chicago and 42-52 this season, with his team 10 1/2 games out of first place in the National League Central.

Piniella has said this will be his last managing job. He's 1,826-1,691 in 23 seasons as a manager with the Yankees, Reds, Mariners, Rays and Cubs.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.



Category: MLB
Posted on: July 16, 2010 4:20 pm
Edited on: July 16, 2010 7:43 pm
 

Votto happy to be enemy of Cubs fans


Joey Votto CINCINNATI -- Joey Votto said he was joking when he told a Chicago reporter he didn't like the Cubs following the All-Star Game, but he doesn't mind being the target of Cubs fans boos.

"I think it's kind of fun to play the heel," Votto said.

Following Tuesday night's All-Star Game, Votto was quoted by ESPNChicago.com's Bruce Levine as saying, "I don't like the Cubs. And I'm not going to pat anybody with a Cubs uniform on the back."

Friday, Votto noted he was laughing when he said that and it may not have come over quite right when seen in black and white.

"The shame of it is Marlon and I got along the best on the bench and in the outfield and stuff, I talked to him and I was one of the first people to congratulate him in Chicago [when the All-Star teams were named]," Votto said Friday. "It was definitely taken out of context. I was laughing when I said it. I have the utmost respect for the Cubs in general -- not necessarily for the fans, but …"

Votto laughed after he said that, but the blog Church of Baseball , run by a Reds fan, dug up this video earlier this week in the wake of the Votto-Cubs flap.



The video shows Votto telling a young Cubs fan "I don't sign for Cubs fans."

Votto didn't deny that, either.

"I don't," Votto said, with a laugh. "I try not to. They're in our same division and we play good baseball against them. I think it's kind of fun to play the heel. Not everything has to be friendly, we take it seriously every time we go there. It's not just a game to us, it's our job."

Votto traces his Cub-dislike to 2007, when he was called up in September and watched the Cubs celebrate a division title at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati.

"I still remember that now, I remember them looking at the scoreboard and Cubs fans cheering and everyone in the stands wearing blue," Votto said. "I still remember that and it meant a lot to me. I guess I should probably let it go, but I'm not an easy forgiver."

The Cubs' Byrd didn't seem too worked up about the "controversy" telling MLB.com's Carrie Muskat that he understood Votto's sentiment.

"That's the competitiveness of Joey Votto," Byrd said. "He's an MVP candidate right now, he's going to say what he believes. But at the same time, I don't think any Cub is going to be patting anyone on the Cincinnati Reds on the back during the season. They're the ones in first place and we're chasing them. We're going to have to come after them hard."

Cubs manager Lou Piniella said he understood Votto's statement as well.

"I don't think he likes the Cardinals either," Piniella told Muskat. "I think it's more of an [intradivisional] thing."

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Posted on: July 3, 2010 1:59 pm
Edited on: July 3, 2010 7:47 pm
 

Cubs silence their own bats


Alfonso Soriano Practice makes perfect? Maybe not. Maybe practice makes Cubs. And that's not good.

Chicago manager Lou Piniella told the Chicago Tribune 's Dave van Dyck that "sometimes less is more" before he cancelled batting practice and closed the Cubs' outfield hitting area before Saturday's game with the Reds.

The Cubs have scored three or fewer runs in 11 of their last 13 games, including five shutouts.

It doesn't help that the team is facing one of the National League's hottest pitchers, Johnny Cueto on Saturday, either. Cueto is 8-2 with a 3.74 ERA and entered the game having given up just 11 hits and one earned run in his last three starts, good for a 1-1 record and a 0.71 ERA.

UPDATE: Well, no real shocker here, but it looks like Piniella knows more about his team -- and baseball -- than I do. The Cubs have hits in each of the first five innings against Cueto, including leadoff hits in four of those innings. As of the bottom of the fifth, though, that hasn't led to any runs. The Cubs now have seven hits, including a leadoff double by Marlon Byrd in the fifth, while Randy Wells has held the NL's leading offense hitless through five.

UPDATE 2: The Cubs banged out 10 hits on Saturday in their 3-1 victory over the Reds, so Piniella's plan worked, although not perfectly. Sure, it's picking nits when you win, but Chicago left 17 runners on base. The National League record for most men left on base in a nine-inning game is 18, done most recently by Atlanta on June 23, 1986. The Yankees left 20 on base on September 21, 1956.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.





Posted on: June 27, 2010 1:59 pm
Edited on: June 27, 2010 2:04 pm
 

Zambrano Watch: Day 3

Carlos Zambrano Another day, another day full of Carlos Zambrano drama.

The short history for you if you've missed it all: Zambrano stunk against the White Sox, continued his tired baby act in the dugout, was pulled from the game, got in a screaming match with Derrek Lee, got sent to the clubhouse, then sent home, was suspended indefinitely by the team, ruffled feathers by going out to dinner with White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen that night and then manager Lou Piniella said if the Cubs re-instate Zambrano, he'll be headed to the bullpen. And that's as short as I can make the roundup.

So, what's up today? First off, Major League Baseball and the Players Association are expected to meet today about the suspension.

"It's really kind of a day or two away from knowing any more than that," general manager Jim Hendry tells the Chicago Tribune 's Paul Sullivan .

The Cubs would like to replace Zambrano on the roster, but are now playing with 24 men until the Zambrano situation is resolved.

Secondly, Piniella said nobody in team management has talked to Zambrano since Friday's outburst.

Thirdly, the Chicago Sun-Times ' Gordon Wittenmyer has talked to a friend of Zambrano who gives his side of the story.

Here's what Wittenmyer wrote:

And Zambrano already is calling his actions Friday ''completely misunderstood'' and blaming Derrek Lee for turning it into a big deal by confronting him during his ranting and raving after the White Sox' four-run first inning.

''All he wanted to do was pump the team up. It was completely misunderstood,'' a source close to Zambrano said, adding that Lee ''took it personal'' and told Zambrano to ''shut the f--- up.''

Yet team sources say Zambrano's rant -- much of which was in Spanish -- included yelling, ''This team is horse s----!''

That's when Lee is caught on camera intervening and telling Zambrano to shut up.

They had to be separated.

So, about Zambrano's version?

''That's not the way we see it,'' said Alfonso Soriano, who planned to call Zambrano on Saturday night. ''If he explains, maybe we can see it the way his friend sees it. But what he said wasn't right.''

As one Cub put it, ''Anybody who believes [Zambrano's version] must be smoking something.''

Asked if teammates could forgive Zambrano, Soriano said, ''I don't know.'' 

 

Wittenmyer also adds that pitcher Carlos Silva, in his first year with the club, is Zambrano's "only" friend on the club and the rest of the club is hoping Zambrano isn't a Cub much longer.

There's little doubt this story will end in typical Cub fashion -- neither well, nor soon.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.




 
 
 
 
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