Tag:Mike Scioscia
Posted on: August 12, 2011 12:07 pm
 

Angels won't change signs in Toronto



By C. Trent Rosecrans


The Angels are the next team headed to face the Blue Jays at Rogers Centre and manager Mike Scioscia told Bill Plunkett of the Orange County Register that he doesn't "anticipate" changing the team's signs in the wake of the sign-stealing allegations.

Scioscia also added that he'd never heard of the mysterious "man in white" in the stands.

"What makes that hard to believe is if something like that is going on and a player changes teams, that information would get out," Scioscia told the paper. "If you're part of a team and you know something like that that's not kosher is going on and then you change teams -- that word is going to get out."

Scott DownsLike, by say former Blue Jays pitcher Scott Downs, now an Angel.

"I played there for six years and I didn't hear anything about anything like that," Downs told Plunkett. 

Downs added -- "I'd be dumb not to say anything [to his new team.]"

Downs also defended Jose Bautista, saying Bautista is a testament to hard work, nothing else.

It could be that Downs and Scioscia are playing dumb and they're in on a vast conspiracy keeping this on the down-low -- or that only the hitters knew of the "man in white" and kept it from the pitchers, who had no need to know and could only hurt them if they went somewhere else. Or the report could just be a rumor. Or, most likely, the truth is somewhere in-between.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: August 3, 2011 7:36 pm
 

Why did Trout go back to Double-A?

Mike TroutBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Mike Trout is back in the minors, but many were surprised when the Angels sent him to Double-A Arkansas instead of Triple-A Salt Lake City.

So, why is the 19-year-old outfielder going back to the Texas League instead of the Pacific Coast League? Angels manager Mike Scioscia told reporters, including Marcia C. Smith of the Orange County Register, on Wednesday that there were two reasons.

1. Pitching: "What we're getting from our scouts is that there's a lot of really high-end prospects throwing the ball down there right now," Scioscia said.

2. Playoffs: "Double-A's going to the playoffs and we really feel strongly that in a player's development it's important to experience the playoffs. In Mike's case, he's a guy who's leading a team to the playoffs. His comfort level is there."

The Travelers won the first-half title in the North division in the league, so they're guaranteed a spot in the postseason.

Another thing many front-office types like about the Texas League is that there are just eight teams in the league, meaning players face the same teams repeatedly and must make more adjustments because the pitchers and hitters are so familiar with each other.

In his first two games back at Double-A, Trout's 3 for 8. In 14 games for the Angels, Trout hit .163/.213/.279 with a home run and two doubles in 47 plate appearances. At Double-A, he's hitting .326/.416/.530. 

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: July 26, 2011 1:02 am
Edited on: July 26, 2011 8:21 am
 

Monday's trade rumor roundup

By C. Trent Rosecrans

As the non-waiver trade deadline looms on Sunday, the rumors are coming fast and furious -- with some make sense and others not so much. Much of what you hear at this time of year is a smokescreen, but baseball fans love gossip more than junior high school girls, with less regard to the truth. So, to help satisfy that desire, we're rounding up the day's rumors in one place.

• The Rays won't deal James Shields, our own CBSSports.com senior writer Danny Knobler reports. Tampa Bay has told other teams that they won't discuss Shields, David Price or Jeremy Hellickson. That said, Jeff Niemann and Wade Davis are available, as is B.J. Upton.

MLB Trade Deadline

• The Rays are also offering closer Kyle Farnsworth to anyone interested, Buster Olney of ESPN.com tweets.

• CBSSports.com's Scott Miller says he's also heard that the Phillies have "way cooled" on acquiring Carlos Beltran, backing up Knobler's report from Sunday.

• Jerry Crasnick of ESPN.com tweets the Rangers and Giants are ahead of the Phillies and Braves as of Monday.

• The chance of the Rockies dealing Ubaldo Jimenez is "around 50/50" FoxSports.com's Jon Paul Morosi writes, citing a "major-league source close to the talks." He adds the Reds are still involved and the Tigers are interested as well. Morosi reports one team has exchanged names with the Rockies.

• The Reds are drawing interest on right-hander Edinson Volquez, Ken Rosenthal of FoxSports.com tweets.

• The Cardinals and Nationals have talked about sending Todd Coffey -- a former Red and Brewer -- to St. Louis. The team would like to keep Tyler Clippard, but if someone wows them, they're open, Morosi tweets.

• The Yankees won't move top prospects -- such as left-hander Manny Banuelos, right-hander Dellin Betances or catchers Jesus Montero or Austin Romine -- unless they get an ace-type pitcher in return, Joel Sherman of the New York Post tweets.

• The Phillies are "aggressive" on Heath Bell and Mike Adams of the Padres, but are surprised they aren't getting more interest fron the Yankees, Cardinals and Reds, Sherman tweets.

• Astros left-hander Wandy Rodriguez is available, but with $40 million left on his contract, another general manager tells Sports Illustrated's Jon Heyman, "nobody's going to touch Wandy."

• Hiroki Kuroda would consider waiving his no-trade clause if he's sent to the Yankees or Red Sox, "a baseball official"  tells ESPNNewYork.com's Andrew Marchand. However, the teams "hottest" on Kuroda are reportedly the Indians, Tigers and Rangers, according to Rosenthal.

• It's not a trade, but a player acquisition -- the Brewers, Giants, Mariners and A's are interested in Wily Mo Pena, who was released by the Diamondbacks on Sunday, Heyman tweets. He makes the most sense in the American League where he doesn't need a glove. [Heyman]

• Aaron Harang had been mentioned in some trade talks, but there are reports that San Diego would like to keep him and re-sign him, according to Jayson Stark of ESPN.com. Harang, a San Diego native, would love to stay there -- and keep pitching in Petco Park.

• The Phillies are interested in Colorado's Jason Giambi, Rosenthal tweets. Troy E. Renck of the Denver Post tweets the Pirates are interested in Giambi as well. He's hitting .263/.360/.632 with 10 homers in 111 plate appearances. Giambi had talked about possibly moving to an American League team to DH, but he could still be a valuable left-handed bat off the bench for a National League team. [FoxSports.com and Denver Post]

• The Braves are still interested in the Astros' Hunter Pence, David O'Brien of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution tweets.

• Angels manager Mike Scioscia told MLB.com's Lyle Spencer the team probably wouldn't make a big move at the trade deadline, instead hoping the team can improve from within -- especially with the addition of Fernando Rodney from the disabled list.

• Texas manager Ron Washington called the bullpen a "priority" at the trading deadline, according to MLB.com's T.R. Sullivan.

• One reliever who won't be available to the Rangers, or anyone, is Seattle closer Brandon League. Chuck Armstrong tells Morosi a trade involving League is not likely.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: July 22, 2011 8:23 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 8:32 pm
 

Angels' Trout will stay up when Bourjos returns

Mike TroutBy C. Trent Rosecrans

Peter Bourjos is on his way back, but Mike Trout will stick around in Anaheim, Angels manager Mike Scioscia told reporters before Friday's game in Baltimore.

Bourjos will return to the active lineup when he's eligible on Saturday and will be in Saturday's starting lineup. While most expected hyped rookie Mike Trout to go back to the minors when Bourjos came back from his strained right hamstring, Scioscia said the 19-year-old Trout will go back -- but not right away. "There is a probability of overlap," Scioscia told the Orange County Register.

Trout (right), considered by some as the top prospect in baseball, has started 10 games in Bourjos' absence, including Friday night's game in Baltimore. Coming into Friday's game, Trout was hitting .133/.212/.167 with four hits in 30 at-bats. Scioscia said he thinks his short stint in the majors will be a good learning experience for the talented outfielder.

"I think any young player that comes up -- it's an eye-opener to face major-league pitching and major-league talent," Scioscia said. "I don't think it's going to so much crush your confidence as it's going to give you a baseline of where you need to get to in order to succeed at this level."

Bourjos, 24, is hitting .272/.323/.397 this season with 11 stolen bases and three home runs.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Posted on: June 6, 2011 10:12 am
Edited on: June 6, 2011 10:35 am
 

Pepper: No baseball in November



Can Zack Greinke continue to lead the Brewers? What is going on with Cliff Lee? How important is Josh Hamilton to the Rangers? Scott Miller joins Lauren Shehadi with the answers.

By Evan Brunell


NO BASEBALL IN NOVEMBER
: As baseball tries to expand the postseason to one additional Wild Card series, the question has always been how that can be pulled off without pushing the postseason into November, which both fans and players dislike. Angels manager Mike Scioscia feels the postseason can be limited to just October and accommodate an expansion without eating into the 162-game season.

Scioscia, who is part of a special committee for on-field matters and has input into the expansion of the playoffs, feels that by tightening up travel time and playing the occasional doubleheader, an extra series can be fitted in easily. In regards to travel, Scioscia points to his own team's upcoming trip from L.A. to Seattle, New York, Florida and back to Los Angeles as inefficient because of two off days during the trip.

"I don't know what kindergartner figured that one out, but I think maybe we can move to first grade and get that a little better organized," Scioscia said. "The bottom line is we need to be more efficient with travel."

Scioscia believes teams should play in the division for the bulk of April, July and September, which will cut down on travel, as well as schedule the occasional double-header. If baseball can trim the postseason by a few days as well, the World Series would be complete by the time Halloween rolls around.

"We can't have baseball played in November," Scioscia said. "I don't think the Pilgrims set it up that way." (Los Angeles Times)

SLEEPLESS IN CHICAGO
: Cubs manager Mike Quade admitted after Albert Pujols' 12th inning walk-off home run on Saturday that he needs to do a better job communicating with his pitcher and catcher on what to do in these type of situations. Clearly, he's got some more work to do as Pujols repeated his walk-off home run heroics in the 10th inning Sunday. (MLB.com)

DEAD BALL
: The Phillies won Sunday's game 7-3, but that doesn't mask what was a missed opportunity to score an extra run for Philadelphia. Through no fault of the team, Domonic Brown's single hit the umpire at second base and was immediately ruled a dead ball. There were runners on first and third, but Ryan Howard, on third, was not allowed to advance. The bases were loaded for Wilson Valdez, who grounded into an inning-ending double play. Just overall a weird play and a weird result -- you'd think Howard would be able to score on that play. (MLB.com)

EJECTED
: Jason Marquis was ejected from the game Sunday after plunking Justin Upton for the fourth time in the four-game series. Both Marquis and manager Jim Riggleman were adamant that the HBP was not intentional after two Nationals got hit in the inning previous. You can believe that, as the game was currently 1-0 and Upton represented the go-ahead run on base. (MLB.com)

HARPER DOWN
: Touted Nationals prospect Bryce Harper was hit by a pitch on the left knee in the first inning, and had to leave the game after needing to hobble to the dugout. Good news, though: It appears to be just a bone bruise, so he should be back in the lineup before long. (Washington Post)

ZIMMERMAN REHABBING: In that same game in which Harper was struck by a pitch, third baseman Ryan Zimmerman began his comeback trail by going 2-for-2 with a walk. Zim had an ab tear way back on April 9 and is only just getting back into the fold. It's unclear when Zimmerman will return to Washington, but mid-June looks like a good bet. (MLB.com)

VERLANDER THE BEST? Jim Leyland's been around, so he's got plenty of first-hand experience on which pitcher has been the best to ever pitch for Leyland. The long-time skipper says Verlander has the best stuff of any pitcher he's seen without question, although he still calls Doug Drabek the best pitcher, as Verlander is still learning how to pitch. (MLB.com)

PERFECT IN TRIPLE-A
: Mike Minor has made two spot starts for the Braves due to Brandon Beachy's injury, but was shipped back to Triple-A as the club did not need a fifth starter for a while. Minor showed Atlanta he should be considered for the next spot start after taking a perfect game into the seventh and finishing up with a one-hitter through eight. (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

TIME TO WAIT: Many in the game seemed to feel as if Brett Lawrie would be called up to Toronto last Friday. That changed when he was hit by a pitch, and that bruise has landed him on the seven-day DL although it was backdated to the point where he will only miss two games. Once Lawrie's pain subsides, he's expected to make his major-league debut. (MLB.com)

HITTING HINDERED: Luke Scott's torn labrum is affecting his hitting, he finally admitted on Sunday. Scott is hitting just .224 this year with six home runs and received a cortisone shot in the hopes that clears up the pain. For now, he's still avoiding any talk about surgery. (MASN)

BELTRAN BRUISED: Carlos Beltran has had a strong season so far, crushing a league-leading 19 doubles and playing in 57 of a possible 59 games. On Sunday, he had to leave the game with a bruise after fouling a ball off his right leg, but is considered day-to-day. (New York Times)

BACKSTOP HEALING: Nick Hundley bashed a home run in his rehab start on Sunday, proving his strained oblique has healed nicely. If he comes through his rehab assignment with no setbacks, he could be back in San Diego by Wednesday. (MLB.com)

MENTAL BREAKS: Jason Bay (New York Times) and Alex Rios (MLB.com) are both receiving mental breaks as both players are scuffling. Rios has been letting his frustrating seep out, so manager Ozzie Guillen feels as if Rios could benefit from a few days off. Bay, who has struggled mightily, will be back in the lineup when the team plays again Tuesday.

BATTING AROUND: Curious how many teams have batted around in the order during the first inning without recording an out? Well, the last time that happened was in 2006 when the Indians terrorized K.C. for seven runs before registering their first out, needing 10 hitters to do so. (Baseball Reference)

NEW JOB? Ozzie Guillen's on the hot seat in Chicago, so his job mixing drinks for a charity event could prove a harbinger of his future job. OK, not really. (White Sox Twitter)

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: May 26, 2011 10:12 am
Edited on: May 26, 2011 10:43 am
 

Pepper: Assessing chances of a K-Rod trade



By Evan Brunell

K-ROD TRADEABLE? For a while now, Francisco Rodriguez's $17.5 million vesting option has been seen as a major roadblock to any trade.

Rodriguez is a fine closer, but a $17.5 million figure for a closer is rather exorbitant, especially in recent years as the market for closers has appeared to plateau. K-Rod needs to finish at least 55 games for that option to vest, and he's at 18 through almost two full months. That puts him on pace to clear the threshold by the end of the year for New York, unless the Mets trade him first.

While Rodriguez could be traded to a setup role which would take care of that pesky games-finished requirement, reporter Andy Martino writes that his value as a closer may not be half-bad after all. He cites Rodriguez's dominant on-field play with his new personality off it, with Rodriguez demonstrating remorse for previous actions. It could be a good move for a team comfortable with trading for K-Rod to head up the ninth. It also helps that Rodriguez has expressed a willingness to tear up his current option and renegotiate a new deal.

Lost in this article is the bottom line: Rodriguez won't negotiate away his vesting option unless he stands to benefit by getting an extended contract from the team dealing for him. Helping matters is that K-Rod is willing to consider any team, even one of the 10 teams that are currently blocked thanks to a no-trade clause. But the bottom line remains: there's no reason for Rodriguez to tear up his 2012 option if he doesn't get something out of it. That kind of money over one season is well worth it to Rodriguez, who could then go get another big-money deal after 2012.

But working in favor of the Mets is Rodriguez's $3.5 million buyout. If New York agrees to fund the buyout -- which it must pay regardless of the option vesting -- other teams may change their perception of Rodriguez's value. Instead of digging into their pockets in free agency to sign the likes of Heath Bell and Jonathan Papebon, a team could address the K-Rod issue by having the Mets pick up $3.5 million at the trade deadline, giving the acquiring team one-and-a-half years of Rodriguez at a 2012 price of $14 million. Still hefty, but not outlandish and worth the price of doing business on a short deal. And as we've learned, short deals for closers is a smart route to go. (New York Daily News)

BOBBLEHEAD CURSE
: Sure, Omar Minaya was a pretty bad GM in New York and now Fred Wilpon is on a media blitz designed to tell his side of the story but is only complicating things more. And yet, what might be to blame are bobbleheads, part of a yearly giveaway. Previous bobblehead players have ended up injured or ineffective after garnering the honor. This year's recipient? Ike Davis, currently on the DL. (New York Times)

NO TROUT
: How tired do you think manager Mike Scioscia is of answering questions about 19-year-old prodigy Mike Trout? He continued to deflect any speculation that Trout would be called to the majors despite tearing up the minors and seeing L.A. limp along in left field with Alexi Amarista and Reggie Willits, although he did crack the door open for a promotion in a month. "I think that's a huge risk to take with a player with his upside," Scioscia said. "We see the growth in Mike. He's made an incredible amount of progress from last year to now. He's bridging that gap. Maybe in a month, this would be a different conversation, but right now, there's some growth he needs to be ready for that challenge of the major leagues." (Los Angeles Times)

WELLS ON MEND
: Angels left fielder Vernon Wells made progress in his return from a groin strain. He's not ahead of schedule, but underwent light agility drills and came away without complaint. (Los Angeles Times)

MY TURN: Mike Fontenot knows what groin strains feel like -- he just suffered one Thursday night that will probably get him on the 15-day DL. That's bad news for S.F., which already had a tattered left side of the infield. (San Francisco Chronicle)

RUNNER'S LUCK: The Giants also saw Darren Ford hobbled by a lateral sprain on his left ankle that will likely see the pinch-runner hit the DL. Bruce Bochy said there it would be "a longshot" for Brandon Belt to replace Ford on the roster. More likely is Ryan Rohlinger or Travis Ishikawa. (San Jose Mercury News)

STANTON'S BOMBS: Florida Marlins sluggger Mike Stanton is an attraction during batting practice these days. In San Francisco he drew applause from Giants fans as he launched home runs, including a standing ovation for a batting practice moonshot that went more than 500 feet. The applause quickly dissipated when he carried his home-run swing over into the game. (Palm Beach Post)

CASH IN THE BULLPEN
: When Andrew Cashner returns from his injury, bet on him moving into the bullpen. "When you miss a few months with an arm injury you cannot just go right back to pitching six innings or more when you return so I would think that he would be in the pen when he does come back this season," Cubs manager Jim Hendry said. If true, the Cubs are going to have to find another starting pitcher somewhere. They're so close in getting Casey Coleman out of the rotation, but still have Doug Davis to contend with, with only Coleman as depth. (CSNChicago.com)

SIZEMORE NEAR: Grady Sizemore has come through his rehab work so nicely that he may actually be activated the first game he is eligible for, which is Friday. His replacement on the major-league roster, Ezequiel Carrera, was seen shaking hands with teammates. Sizemore ran the bases prior to Wednesday's game and came through with no issues, putting him on track to be activated for the weekend series. (MLB.com)

BAD STEW: Rockies third baseman Ian Stewart pulled his hamstring in a game in Triple-A on Wednesday, so it looks like he will be out of action for a couple of weeks. Just another bad day in a line of bad days for Stewart this season. (Denver Post)

NO. 2: With the Mariners a surprising game under .500 and a weekend series with the Yankees coming up, Seattle needs to find a way to boost its offense if they hope to come away with a series win. How about batting Brendan Ryan, in the midst of a hot month, second in the order? (Seattle Times)

THOLE DIVE: In this day and age, if you mess up, you can bet everyone will soon be giggling at a .GIF of it. Josh Thole is no exception. (SB Nation)

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: April 16, 2011 10:59 pm
 

Angels' Conger making most of opportunity

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Hank CongerAngels rookie catcher Hank Conger wasn't the only person surprised on Saturday when he walked into U.S. Cellular Field and saw his name in the lineup for the third day in a row and sixth time in 14 games. Veteran Jeff Mathis noticed as well, and he reportedly had a closed-door meeting with manager Mike Scioscia before the Angels' 7-2 victory over the White Sox.

Mathis then refused to talk to reporters after the meeting.

Conger, though, continued to show why he's in the lineup, going 2 for 4 with a three-run homer and a double in the win. So far this season, he's hitting .286/.375/.619 with two homers in 21 at-bats.

"[Playing time] has been a little bit of a surprise," Conger told the Orange County Register's Bill Plunkett. "As long as I'm here, I just want to make the most out of my opportunities and make sure I'm prepared to play every day."

Out of spring training, Conger was one of three catchers the team kept along with Mathis and Bobby Wilson. Conger, 23, said he expected to be sent back to Triple-A Salt Lake after right-hander Joel Pineiro was eligible to come off the disabled list. Instead, the team kept the switch-hitting Conger.

Scioscia said Conger hasn't won the No. 1 catching spot yet.

"No. Getting a look," Scioscia said. "We're looking for solutions to what was really a rough offensive year for us last year."

The team did trade away a good-hitting catcher in Mike Napoli (26 home runs last season) during the offseason, but Scioscia was not a fan of Napoli behind the plate. So far, he's been impressed with Conger's catching. Conger hit .300/.385/.463 at Triple-A Salt Lake last season. Mathis, 28, is hitting .192/.185/.423 with a home run in 27 at-bats. Wilson, 28, has a single in seven at-bats in his two starts.

Scioscia said the team may keep three catchers for a while, even with shortstop Erick Aybar eligible to come off the disabled list on Monday.

"Right now, it still feels like nothing's really established," Conger said. "You have to perform whenever you get an opportunity. I'm definitely thinking that way, especially after [relievers Kevin Jepsen and Micahel Kohn] going down [to Triple-A].

"Nothing is set in stone. Ever."

Mathis is figuring that out himself.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. 
Posted on: April 9, 2011 2:09 am
Edited on: April 9, 2011 2:21 am
 

Angels place Kazmir on DL

By C. Trent Rosecrans

The Angels have placed left-hander Scott Kazmir on the 15-day disabled list with tightness on his lower back. Matt Palmer will be called up in time to start today against the Blue Jays.

Scott Kazmir"It's very frustrating," Kazmir told reporters, including Bill Plunkett of the Orange County Register. "I kind of changed my delivery a bit and it seemed like the lower back never bounced back."

Kazmir lasted just 1 2/3 innings Sunday against the Royals, allowing five runs on five hits, two walks and two hit batters (not to mention a balk).

Kazmir worked out Wednesday in Tampa Bay, but manager Mike Scioscia said Kazmir started complaining about his back tightening up.

"We'll push him back and give him a few days for this to calm down," Scioscia said.

Palmer struggled this spring with bronchitis, but pitched well at the end of spring training. He was 11-2 with a  3.93 ERA in 2009 before a shoulder sprain hindered his performance in Triple-A and with the Angels in 2010.

The Angels still need a starter for Tuesday to replace Joel Pineiro, who went on the DL with soreness in the back of his shoulder. Trevor Bell is likely to get the call to pitch against the Indians.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com