Play Fantasy The Most Award Winning Fantasy game with real time scoring, top expert analysis, custom settings, and more. Play Now
 
Tag:Pete Rose
Posted on: November 4, 2010 5:02 pm
Edited on: November 4, 2010 5:53 pm
 

Sparky Anderson remembered

Sparky Anderson One of my favorite memories of newspapering was when an editor at the Cincinnati Post asked me to call Sparky Anderson for a story I was doing.

"Do you have his number?" I asked.

Nope, no need. He was listed. Thousand Oaks, Calif., George Anderson. A simple call to information and I had his number. Minutes later, I was on the phone with the Hall of Fame manager. The next 30 minutes I got to listen to Sparky Anderson tell stories about the Big Red Machine.

A year later, in 2005, I met Anderson and did a story on the Reds retiring his number. His former players joined him in a news conference, and Anderson didn't say too much, he just sat back as Johnny Bench and Tony Perez held court, telling their stories of Anderson. Anderson just laughed, and the old team was together again, performing at a top level -- because of Anderson.

On Thursday, some of those same people are telling stories, but in a more somber way. Here's some reaction from around baseball.

• Tony Perez: "Sparky was a great man and a great manager. He was the man who put together some great teams and made us go. We will miss him. We love him."

• Pete Rose: "Baseball lost an ambassador today. Sparky was, by far, the best manager I ever played for. He understood people better than anyone I ever met. His players loved him, he loved his players, and he loved the game of baseball. There isn't another person in baseball like Sparky Anderson. He gave his whole life to the game."

• Gary Nolan: "I have a lot of respect for Sparky Anderson and am very saddened to hear of his passing. He was a heck of a manager and handled personalities on the team very well. Sparky and I had quite a few conversations about pitching philosophy, and the way he used his bullpen was the key to his success. He was like a father to the guys on the team, a heck of a leader and a great baseball mind."

• Tommy Helms: "Sparky saw what he had and was able to get the most out of them. He was a people person. He knew how to handle people and get them to get along. If you can get even 90 percent of 25 guys on the same page, you're doing a good job. With Sparky, even if everyone didn’t get along off the field, by God they were all together when they were on it. He just did an outstanding job and treated everyone with class.”

• Reds owner Bob Castellini: "All of baseball mourns the passing of one of the game's all-time great managers and ambassadors. In one way or another, Sparky touched the life of every Reds fan. Every person who visits our ballpark and Hall of Fame is reminded of his contribution to the success of this proud franchise. We offer our prayers and support to Sparky's family and friends during this difficult time."

• Bud Selig: "I am truly saddened by the loss of Sparky Anderson. I have lost and all of Baseball has lost a dear friend. Sparky was a gentleman, a great baseball man and a superb ambassador for the game.  Sparky won three World Series Championships with the Cincinnati Reds and the Detroit Tigers, leading several of the best teams of the last 40 years and holding the most wins as manager for both tradition-rich franchises.

"I recall with great fondness the many hours we would spend together when his Tigers came to Milwaukee. Sparky was a loyal friend, and whenever I would be dealing with difficult situations as Commissioner, he would lift my spirits, telling me to keep my head up and that I was doing the right thing.

"On behalf of our game, I send my deepest condolences to Sparky’s wife, Carol, his three children, his nine grandchildren, and to all of his fans in Cincinnati, Detroit and throughout Baseball who were touched by this great man."

• Al Kaline (via Detroit Free Press ): “Sparky was one of the greatest people I’ve met in baseball. He was a leader to his players both on and off the field. He was an incredible person and I cherish the time I was able to spend with him. He was a great leader and a great baseball man.”

• Lance Perish (via MLB.com ): "He was always pushing and cracking the whip. He just pushed the right buttons all the time. If there was ever, in my collection of my baseball career, a guy who always seemed to know the buttons to push or things to say, he did it. It's a real tribute to him as a manager, but he seemed to know the personality of everybody on the team and who to delegate what to, when to put the right guy in the right situation. Everything worked out."

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.






Posted on: August 20, 2010 6:28 pm
 

Reds will honor Rose

Pete Rose
Major League Baseball has granted the Reds special permission to honor Pete Rose on the 25th anniversary of him breaking the career hits record.

But get this: Pete's busy that day and can't make it -- he has "commitments" to a local casino. How great is that?

So instead of honoring Rose on the 25th anniversary of his 4,192nd hit, which is September 11, the Cincinnati Enquirer says the team will probably push it to the next day. Details of the ceremony haven't been worked out. Rose has not made an official on-field appearance in Cincinnati since he was banned for gambling in 1989.

"The Reds are celebrating every phase of the 25th anniversary. We approved the request on a one-time basis," Major League Baseball spokesman Patrick Courtney said.

A similar exemption was granted in 1999 for Rose to participate in the All-Century Team celebration at the All-Star Game. Technically, Rose has a petition to be reinstated that is "under review" by commissioner Bud Selig, but it has been "under review" since 1997.

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.
Category: MLB
Tags: Pete Rose, Reds
 
Posted on: August 5, 2010 11:10 am
Edited on: August 5, 2010 2:50 pm
 

Rose in Hall? Over his dead body

Pete Rose
Filmmaker Ken Burns, creator of the landmark documentary project Baseball , told the Television Critics Association on Wednesday that Pete Rose should be in the Hall of Fame -- but not until after he dies.

"He deserves to be in the Hall of Fame. But he doesn't deserve to know he's in the Hall of Fame," Burns said. "But that's just one person's opinion."

As morbid and flippant as that comment sounds, it really does encapsulate the crux of the Rose problem for a lot of people.

However you feel about what Rose did, the Hall of Fame is flawed without the all-time hits leader in it. From a logical perspective, the Hall is historically inaccurate.

But what many people who love baseball can't stand the thought of is Rose standing at that Cooperstown podium, wearing the smug, defiant grin that has infuriated so many. After all the denials and admissions and switchbacks and hucksterism, people don't want Rose to have the satisfaction of having won.

It seems inevitable that someday, some way, Rose will wind up with a plaque on that wall. But it seems impossible that it will happen while Rose is around to enjoy it.

-- David Andriesen

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.




Category: MLB
Posted on: July 9, 2010 6:25 pm
Edited on: July 9, 2010 7:13 pm
 

Rose-Fosse collision still resonates


Before the All-Star Game "counted," Pete Rose proved it mattered.

Or, at least, it did matter to Rose. But every game mattered to Rose. In the 1970 All-Star Game, he showed the rest of the country, if they didn't know already, that he'd do anything to win.

In what has become an essential part of Rose lore, he ran over Indians catcher Ray Fosse to score the winning run in the 12th inning of the 1970 game. (Box score)

The game was not only hosted by Rose's Reds, but also in his hometown of Cincinnati, where to this day, he is more remembered for 4,192 than his later gambling scandal.

Played July 14, 1970, it was just the 12th game at the new Riverfront Stadium. The Reds were Red, but they were yet Big or a Machine. In fact, Joe Morgan was in the game as an Astro, not a Red.

It was in the middle of a seven-game winning streak by the National League, and it appeared the AL would finally get a win, as Catfish Hunter entered the game with a 4-1 lead in the ninth and facing Dick Dietz, Bud Harrelson and Cito Gaston to seal the victory -- none of the trio would join Hunter in Cooperstown, and it's likely nobody expected them to do so.

Pete Rose Dietz, though, led off with a homer, followed by a single by Harrelson. After Gaston popped up, Morgan singled to right and that was it for Hunter, replaced by Fritz Peterson, who immediately gave up a single to Willie McCovey, scoring Harrelson and putting the tying run on third.

That was it for Peterson, replaced by Mel Stottlemyre, in to face pinch-hitter Roberto Clemente. Clemente lined out to center, but Morgan scored. Rose had a chance to win it, but struck out, sending the game to extra innings.

Rose wouldn't waste his second chance, singling to center with two outs in the 12th, advancing to second on Billy Grabarkewitz's single.

The next batter, Jim Hickman, singled to center and third-base coach Leo Durocher waved Rose home.

Rose was rounding third and saw Amos Otis fielding the ball and in a good to position to beat him with a throw home.

As he got closer to the plate, Rose leaned forward, ready to dive head-first into the plate, but Fosse had the plate blocked and Rose did what Rose would always do -- anything necessary to score.

With a full head of steam, Rose ducked his left shoulder into Fosse before the ball arrived, sending Fosse backward as the ball rolled harmlessly away.

In the difference between then and now, even the American League manager defended Rose.

"That's definitely the only way to play," Earl Weaver said. "You play to win. You don't compromise."

Pete Rose always played to win and never compromised, even in an exhibition.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

More All-Star memories -- 2002: The Tie; 1999: The Kid steals the show; 1949: First integrated edition; 1941: Teddy Ballagame's walk-off homer

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.



Posted on: July 8, 2010 4:30 pm
Edited on: April 18, 2011 11:58 am
 

1999: the Kid steals the show

In anticipation of the 2010 All-Star Game in Anaheim on Tuesday, July 13, the CBS Sports MLB Facts and Rumors blog looks back at some of the more memorable editions of the All-Star Game. Today looks at the 1999 All-Star Game.

I sat slack-jawed with a tape recorder rolling and no questions in my head, just a desire for the answers to never stop coming.

It was a hotel ballroom in Boston, and Warren Spahn and I were among four or five stragglers in there. He was telling the story of his epic 16-inning, complete-game performance against Juan Marichal and the Giants at Candlestick Park in 1963. It was at least the second time Spahn had told it that day and likely the 10th, and I'd even heard it once before, but I listened again. Just as he mentioned Willie Mays' homer, someone walked into the room and said it was time for Spahn to go.

He apologized, said he could go on for hours and I told him I could listen for more. An hour before, the room had been full of the greatest major-league players in history. Mays was there, so was Marichal, not to mention Hank Aaron, Johnny Bench, Bob Gibson, Frank Robinson, Brooks Robinson -- pretty much everywhere I turned, I bumped into a Hall of Famer.

While All-Star Games are naturally filled with All-Stars, the 1999 game was different. It was filled with bigger stars than just the usual names, even in this, the summer following the Mark McGwire-Sammy Sosa slugfest before it lost its luster. They were there, as was Ken Griffey Jr. at the height of his popularity. Pedro Martinez was making hometown fans think the curse may be bunk. But still, among all the All-Star Games in the history of the exhibition, this was less about the game and the current players than any other.

The 1999 game was not only at one of the country's most historic ballparks, Fenway Park, it was also coming at the time of an endless stream of best-of-the-century lists. But baseball's list, its Team of the Century, was kicked off in a different fashion than any other.

While other places talked of history, it was on display in Boston. Most people didn't see this part, because it was before MLB had 24 hours a day to fill with TV programming, but baseball announced its 100 greatest players of the 20th century in a news conference with the vast majority of the living members of that club in attendance in a hotel ballroom in Boston.

It was an amazing display of the game's greats, and after an entertaining hour-or-so, the players were brought into another room for one-on-one interviews. It was an hour of baseball geek bliss. At 23, I was slightly intimidated and more than happy to listen in on the conversations of the likes of Willie McCovey, Robin Yount, Mike Schmidt and Yogi Berra, among others.

Ted Williams, Pete Rose and Sandy Koufax weren't there, but it was hard to complain about their absence -- or the two from the dais that skipped the one-on-ones, Stan Musial and George Brett, although with Missouri roots, those were the two I'd hoped to interview more than the others.

Ted Williams By the time the all-time greats were introduced on the field the night of the game, I thought I was goose-bumped out. Until, right in front of my seat in the right field auxiliary press box, came Williams in on a golf cart. He did a lap and ultimately was the center of attention as he prepared to throw the first pitch.

It was a moment. A moment for baseball, a moment for baseball fans across the country to share their memories with another generation of fans -- to share their own stories of seeing Mays or Mantle play. In short, it was the rare moment when the ceremonial first pitch outshines the real first pitch. Even future Hall of Famers like Cal Ripken Jr. and Tony Gwynn seemed to grasp the special nature of the moment. We all did -- those at Fenway and even those watching at home.

Martinez went on to become the first All-Star pitcher to strike out the side in the first inning, fanning Barry Larkin, Larry Walker and Sosa to start the game. He then struck out McGwire to lead off the second, bringing to mind Carl Hubbell's 1934 feat of getting Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmy Foxx, Al Simmons and Joe Cronin consecutively. It was an impressive display, even after Matt Williams broke Martinez's strikeout streak, reaching on an error. Martinez would win the game and the MVP, but even before he faced Larkin, the game had earned its spot in history.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

More All-Star memories -- 2002: The Tie ; 1949: First integrated edition ; 1941: Teddy Ballagame's walk-off homer

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.


Posted on: June 19, 2010 1:04 pm
 

X-rays negative for more Rose bats

Pete Rose Prompted by a report on Deadspin.com last week, two Cincinnati baseball collectors had their Pete Rose bats X-rayed to see if they were corked. The results to Bob Crotty's Mizuno PR4192 and Mark Fugate's Mizuno ATHL showed nothing but wood in the bats.

Crotty, who owns Green Diamond Gallery in Cincinnati, said it was common knowledge in collecting circles that there were some corked Rose bats out there, especially in the model PR4192, which Rose used for hits No. 4,000-4,192. Crotty's particular bat shows significant use and is on display at his private gallery alongside a bat used by Ty Cobb. After Deadspin's story, Crotty decided to have his bat X-rayed.

"I simply wanted to," Crotty wrote in an e-mail with CBSSports.com, "to add to the story and offer more evidence or examples, regardless of X-ray results."

Rose himself visited Green Diamond Gallery within hours of the X-ray results, Crotty said and told him he never used corked bats, "wearing a Reds uniform, anyway."

Fugate's ATHL model was used following hit No. 4,192.

The X-rays were taken at Evendale Surgery Center in Cincinnati.

Crotty estimates Rose used 30 different model PR4192 bats and is in negotiations to buy another PR4192.

"In the end, add this evidence to previous evidence and it all adds up to the Pete brand as we have all come too familiar with -- drama and controversy along with 'did he or didn't he' continue to be a major part of the Pete Rose brand," Crotty wrote.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter.

Category: MLB
Posted on: June 8, 2010 2:03 pm
Edited on: June 8, 2010 2:18 pm
 

Rose legacy takes another hit


A detailed investigation by Barry Petchesky of Deadspin.com indicates that Pete Rose used corked bats during his 1985 chase for baseball's all-time hits record.

A photo accompanying the story shows an X-ray of a game-used bat with a clear area of foreign material about six inches long in the barrel. The bat is purportedly part of a batch of about 30 Mizuno bats Rose had specially made for him in 1985, when he was player-manager of the Reds and chasing down Ty Cobb's record of 4,191 hits.

Bat-corking is intended to make a bat lighter without a sacrifice in power. The practice is called "corking" even though various materials have been used to fill hollowed-out spaces over the years. The benefit corking has been widely debated and tested, and the results indicate that the edge is dubious at best. In fact, a 2007 experiment by the TV show Mythbusters showed that corking actually causes a notable decrease in how far a ball will travel off a bat (video here ). Any benefit is probably mental.

Nevertheless, it's explicitly against the rules. It has never been clear how widespread corking is, and only six players have been disciplined for the practice: Graig Nettles, Billy Hatcher, Albert Belle, Chris Sabo, Wilton Guerrero and Sammy Sosa. Rose has repeatedly denied corking his bat and challenged anyone to produce a bat he used that was corked (he didn't respond to Deadspin's requests for comment). Of course, Rose repeatedly denied betting on baseball, too, until he figured out he could benefit from admitting it.

The point isn't whether altered bats helped Rose get the hits record. The point is that, if this report is true, Rose knowingly cheated. The Hall of Fame looks further away than ever.

-- David Andriesen, CBSSports.com


Category: MLB
Tags: Pete Rose, Reds
 
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com