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Tag:Ryan Doumit
Posted on: June 9, 2011 6:13 pm
Edited on: June 9, 2011 6:26 pm
 

Snyder has herniated disc, to have back surgery

By Matt Snyder

Pirates catcher Chris Snyder has been placed on the disabled list with a back injury, and the news gets worse from there. Snyder has suffered disc herniation and will have to have surgery Friday (MLB.com via Twitter). The Pirates haven't given a timetable for his return, but herniated disc surgery means he's going to be shelved for quite a while. Maybe even the rest of the 2011 season.

Snyder is hitting .271 with 17 RBI and a .772 OPS in 34 games. His .376 OBP is outstanding for a catcher.

This is a pretty big blow for the Pirates. They haven't had a season of .500 or better since 1992 but are currently sitting right at .500 (30-30). Ryan Doumit is on the disabled list with a fractured ankle and isn't going to be back before the end of June at the earliest. That leaves the Pirates with Dusty Brown and Wyatt Toregas behind the plate for the time being. Basically, don't expect much offense from the Pirates' catchers until Doumit is healthy enough to return.

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Posted on: June 8, 2011 3:01 pm
Edited on: June 8, 2011 3:58 pm
 

Who could Giants pursue at catcher?

By Evan Brunell

Now that the Giants have had some time to evaluate Eli Whiteside as a starting catcher, they're readying to acquire a new catcher -- if not two, the San Jose Mercury News reports.

Whiteside has been the Giants' backup catcher since the beginning of 2009 but hasn't shown any capability with the stick. He's at .164/.266/.255 in 64 plate appearances and as the Mercury News days, has fared poorly on throws to second base and allowing too many passed balls or dropped pitches.

Now, it appears the Giants are ready to move on. One name being mentioned is Ivan Rodriguez, awho is transitioning into a backup role and would find more playing time in San Francisco. However, there are two major roadblocks: Rodriguez is struggling at the plate himself and reportedly told the Nationals he does not want to be traded. While I-Rod would contribute to the Giants on defense and intangibles, the combination of no stick and desire to be traded despite being moved into a backup role could be enough to scare San Francisco away, at least for now.

Not counting the flotsam that's floating around (lookin' at ya, Matt Treanor), here's a look at what catchers could be considered for San Francisco:

SnyderDoumitChris Snyder and Ryan Doumit, Pirates: Snyder (left) was acquired from the Diamondbacks last season and has a .263/.371/.389 line in 118 plate appearances and has been battling Doumit for playing time all season. Snyder was a bit of a contract dump last year, but has rebounded nicely after two sub-par seasons. He is due $5.75 million this year with a $750,000 buyout of a $6.75 million club option. The Pirates also have $3 million in their pocket from the Diamondbacks to help defray both his 2010 and 2011 salaries. While his power still hasn't returned, he's a strong defensive catcher with a great OBP that would profile well with the Giants and their miserable .306 OBP. Doumit (right) isn't as good a fit as he's defensively challenged and injury prone but does have a .269/.333/.441 mark in 103 plate appearances. He wouldn't be that bad as a stopgap if the club really wants power. But Snyder's defense and on-base pop should outweigh the added power Doumit brings. The Pirates would accept a minor-league player or young major leaguer, so a fit wouldn't be difficult to find.

BarajasRamon Hernandez, Reds: Hernandez is working on just a one-year deal for $3 million and has a career-best .902 OPS in splitting time with Ryan Hanigan. The 35-year-old has a .312/.374/.528 line and solid defensive production, so it's hard to argue that he wouldn't be the perfect fit. But the Reds are trying to win games themselves, and Ryan Haniganhas yet to deliver on the promise of 2010. Devin Mesoraco is ripping apart Triple-A, but Cincy is no hurry to move on from Hernandez and it will take a competitive offer for the Reds to part with Hernandez -- an offer that is probably out of the Giants' price range.

BarajasRod Barajas, Dodgers: Yeah, the Dodgers are a division rival and are hanging tough in the division at 29-33 and 5 1/2 games out, one of -- if not both -- the win-loss record or games behind figures will likely dip and put L.A. into selling mode the closer the deadline arrives. It doesn't hurt that owner Frank McCourt is scrambling to cut corners in order to meet payroll and keep his team. Barajas is at .208/.271/.371 on the year, putting him squarely in the flotsam category, but really, he's the best of that grouping as he's capable of knocking 20 home runs. If he starts hitting better, the Giants could be interested. Dodgers GM Ned Colletti was Sabean's right-hand man for many years so there is a rapport there.

MathisJeff Mathis, Angels: Manager Mike Scioscia loves Mathis, even though Mathis couldn't hit the broad side of a barn if he tried. Owner of a career 48 OPS+ (that's OPS relative to the league, with 100 average, so he's miles worse than the average league hitter), he's been especially putrid this season with a .207/.237/.279 line while splitting time with Hank Conger and making Bobby Wilson get splinters on the bench. As much as Scioscia values Mathis's defense, Conger is the catcher of the future and the Angels may still be able to extract some value for Mathis in a trade given his defensive reputation. If the Giants can't find a bat to replace Posey, they can at least find an elite defender.

FloresJesus Flores, Nationals: A bit of a surprise name here. Flores was a Rule 5 pick of the Nationals way back in 2007 and received the bulk of playing time in 2008 with 324 plate appearances. He hit for a .256/.296/.402 line. He broke out in 2009 with a .301/.375/.505 mark in 29 games before biting the dust with a right shoulder stress fracture that finished his 2009 season and kept him out of the 2010 season as well. He's been predominantly playing in Triple-A this year but has struggled to get back in the groove with a .243/.262/.360 line in 36 games. He offers upside and could get better as the season goes on and is just 26. He could be a flier for Sabean and provide some depth at the position once Posey returns. He could also offer insurance should Posey not return as catcher. The Nationals wouldn't want to deal him at such a low trade value, though, which could affect things.

That's really it for catchers who currently have significant roles and could be considered a significant upgrade. It's very difficult to find an elite catcher like the Giants had in Posey, which makes it all the more devastating a blow. It's going to be impossible for the team to replace Posey's production behind the plate, which means it needs to look elsewhere for upgrades, like cutting bait with Miguel Tejada, which may occur shortly.

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Posted on: June 7, 2011 10:31 am
Edited on: June 7, 2011 11:25 am
 

Looking back at second-round picks

Joey Votto

By C. Trent Rosecrans


While the first-round of the MLB Draft is gaining more attention in the last couple of years, the later rounds are where most of the work is done. 

The second round starts today at 11 a.m. ET, so here's a look at some of the best second-round picks in recent memory.

Angels: In 1999, the Angels took John Lackey out of Grayson County Community College with the 68th overall pick in the draft. In 1995, they took Jarrod Washburn with the first pick of the second round.

Astros: Perhaps the team's best player right now, outfielder Hunter Pence, was the 64th overall pick in 2004. 

MLB Draft

Athletics: The A's took Vista, Calif., high schooler Trevor Cahill with the 66th overall pick in 2006. Two years before that they took Kurt Suzuki in the second round and in 2003 they took Andre Ethier in the second round. They traded him for Milton Bradley and Antonio Perez in 2005.

Blue Jays: Right-hander Dave Bush in 2002 is probably the team's best second-round pick since taking Derek Bell in 1987.

Brian McCannBraves: Current first baseman Freddie Freeman was selected with the 78th overall pick in 2007, but the best pick was easily 2002's No. 64 overall pick, a local high school catcher named Brian McCann.

Brewers: The Brewers took Yovani Gallardo with the fifth pick of the second round in 2004.

Cardinals: In 2001, the team took Dan Haren with the 72nd overall pick. More recently, Jon Jay was taken in the second round of the 2006 draft.

Cubs: You have to go back pretty far -- unless you go with Bobby Hill -- to find much success with the Cubs' second-round pick, but if you go as far back as 1984, they took Greg Maddux with the third pick of the second round and he turned out OK. Also among their second-round picks is former Dallas Cowboys quarterback Quincy Carter (1996).

Diamondbacks: A's starter Brett Anderson was Arizona's second-rounder in 2006. He was part of the big trade that send Dan Haren to the Diamondbacks.

Dodgers: The Dodgers got future closer Jonathan Broxton with the 60th overall pick in 2002.

Giants: Of recent vintage, the Giants have taken Nate Schierholtz in 2003 and Fred Lewis in 2002, but the most interesting second-round pick by San Francisco was in 1982. That year they took the son of a team legend with the 11th pick of the second round (39th overall), but Barry Bonds went to Arizona State instead.

Indians: Jason Kipnis is one of the team's top prospects, taken in the second round in 2009. In 1995, the Indians took first baseman Sean Casey out of Richmond with the 53rd overall pick.

Mariners: Recently-demoted Orioles starter Chris Tillman was taken in the second round of the 2006 draft. Keep an eye on 2009 second-rounder Rich Poythress, who had 31 homers in Class A last season.

Mike StantonMarlins: It wasn't until the 12th pick of the second round -- and 76th overall -- for someone to pick up Mike Stanton in 2007. 

Mets: There's some slim pickins for the Mets recently, but few Mets fans would trade their second-rounder of 1977, Mookie Wilson. (Seriously, this one was tough, the only players the Mets have picked in the last 15 years who have made the majors were Kevin Mulvey, Neal Musser, Pat Strange and Tyler Walker -- maybe that explains some things.)

Nationals (Expos): Jordan Zimmermann was the team's second-rounder in 2007. Current Reds All-Star second baseman Brandon Phillips was taken by the Expos with the sixth pick of the second round in 1999.

Orioles: Nolan Reimold was taken 61st overall in 2005, but if you want to go back a few years, the team took Cal Ripken with the 22nd pick of the second round in the 1978 draft. Ripken was the third of four picks the Orioles had in the second round that year.

Padres: San Diego took Chase Hedley in 2005.

Phillies: Jimmy Rollins was the team's second-rounder in 1996, going 46th overall.

Pirates: Last year's pick was Stetson Allie, who many expected to go in the first round. Lefty Tom Gorzelanny was taken in the second round in 2003 and catcher Ryan Doumit was taken 59th overall in 1999.

Rangers: The only player taken by the Rangers in the second round of the last decade to make the majors is Jason Bourgeois.

Rays: The Rays famously took Josh Hamilton No. 1 overall in 1999, but their second-round pick that year was pretty good too -- Carl Crawford.

Red Sox: How about Justin Masterson (2006), Dustin Pedroia (2004) and Jon Lester (2002)?

Reds: NL MVP Joey Votto (2002) was the third pick of the second round (44th overall) and Travis Wood was taken in the second round of the 2005 draft. Keep an eye on 2009 pick Billy Hamilton, who already has 45 stolen bases this season for Class A Dayton.

Rockies: For recent vintage, Seth Smith (2004) is the pick, but you can go back a few years and pick Aaron Cook (1997).

George BrettRoyals: For all the prospects the Royals have stockpiled in the last couple of years, strangely not too many are second-rounders. Outfielder Brett Eibner (2010) was the only member of the Royals' Top 10 by Baseball America taken in the second round. You have to go back to Carlos Beltran (1995), Jon Lieber (1992), Bob Hamelin (1988), Mark Gubicza (1981), Darryl Motley (1978) and Dennis Leonard (1972) to find serious big-leaguers. Oh, and also a kid out of El Segundo, Calif., in 1971 named George Brett. He was pretty good, too.

Tigers: The Tigers took Brandon Inge with the 14th pick of the 1998 draft as a catcher out of Virginia Commonwealth. In 1976, Alan Trammell was the second pick of the round.

Twins: A nice run of arms earlier in the decade with Kevin Slowey (2005), Anthony Swarzak (2004), Scott Baker (2003) and Jesse Crain (2002). Frank Viola was the team's second-rounder in 1981.

White Sox: A's outfielder Ryan Sweeney (2003) is the team's best second-rounder since Bob Wickman (1990) -- not counting Jeff Weaver, who went back to school after he was picked in 1997 and was taken by the Tigers a year later.

Yankees: In the last 20 years, only two Yankees second-rounders have made the big leagues, Shelley Duncan (2001) and Randy Keisler (1998). Catching prospect Austin Romine was the team's second-rounder in 2007. In 1982, the team did take a shortstop from McAdory High School in Bessemer, Ala., who went on to play football at Auburn instead. His name is Bo Jackson. That was the year after the team took Stanford outfielder John Elway.

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Posted on: May 31, 2011 6:27 pm
Edited on: May 31, 2011 6:46 pm
 

Doumit out a month with broken ankle

Ryan Doumit

By C. Trent Rosecrans

You know, it's not going to cause outrage like another play at the plate, but Pirates catcher Ryan Doumit is out at least a month with a fractured left ankle, the Pirates announced on Twitter.

Doumit was placed on the 15-day disabled list Monday with what was then termed a sprained ankle, but it's apparently more than that.

Doumit was hurt on a play at the plate in the second inning of Sunday's loss to the Cubs. He didn't get run over like Buster Posey, but he showed that even if a player slides, it can still be dangerous. Cubs first baseman Carlos Pena slid while trying to score on a sacrifice fly. Doumit was blocking the plate with his left leg and Pena's hard slide hurt Doumit's ankle. The difference between Doumit's injury and Posey's is the lack of ligament damage in Doumit's ankle.

Doumit was hitting .269/.333/.441 with four home runs this season. The team called up catcher Dusty Brown on Monday to help replace Doumit.

The Pirates' biggest loss isn't as much on the field as it is having Doumit as a trade chip. Any team that trades for Doumit will have to see that he's healthy before pulling the trigger on a trade. Luckily, if he's only out a month, he'll have nearly a month to prove himself before the trade deadline.

The Pirates are looking to trade him because he's in the final year of a three-year contract that pays $5.1 million this season with a club option for the next two seasons at a total of $15.5 million, which the team may not be able to afford -- or may simply not desire to pay. Pittsburgh also has a $6.75 million option on Chris Snyder, and the team's top prospect is catcher Tony Sanchez, who is currently at Double-A and hitting .271/.378/.368.

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Posted on: May 8, 2011 11:33 pm
 

3 up, 3 down: Here's Johnny



By Matt Snyder


Johnny Cueto, Reds. For the second time in a week, a member of the Reds starting rotation returned from injury to make a solid season debut. Cueto's was even better than Homer Bailey's, as he worked six shutout innings, striking out four while only allowing five hits and a walk. He got in trouble a few times, but worked his way out. In a division that is clearly wide open, getting both Bailey and Cueto back will be a big shot in the arm for the defending Central champs.

Paul Konerko, White Sox. For the third time in his career, "Paulie" -- as homerific White Sox broadcaster Hawk Harrelson calls him -- collected five hits in a game. Yes, that's his career high. One of those hits was a double and Konerko added a run scored as the White Sox put togther two straight victories for the first time since April 25-26. Maybe it's what they need to get on track. There is certainly far too much talent to be playing sub-.400 ball.

Ryan Doumit, Pirates. The offensive-minded catcher entered an at-bat in the eighth inning having gone 0-2, but with one crack of the bat Doumit changed everything. A three-run jack put the Pirates up 5-4 and the lead held. The Pirates are now .500 on the season, which might not mean much to many teams, but the Pirates are still in the midst of a historically futile run of sub-.500 seasons. It's really early in the season, but being .500 after 34 games is a testament to the good young talent the Pirates are bringing along. They aren't going to make a playoff run this year or next, but they are on the road to respectability.




Cody Eppley/Yorvit Torrealba, Rangers. Yes, it appears the Rangers got jobbed on a call at first base to allow Nick Swisher an infield single in the Yankees' half of the eighth. First baseman Mike Napoli crossed over the bag and may have nipped it with the ends of his toes and the umpire called Swisher safe, saying Napoli completely missed the bag. It may have been a bad call, but it wasn't blatant. After that call, Eppley unraveled. The blow-by-blow following the play reads: single, single, home run (a grand slam by Francisco Cervelli), ground out, walk, home run by Mark Teixeira. Mercifully, Eppley was finally removed after that. A 6-5 deficit was now 12-5. To lead off the following inning, Torrealba was retired and made a fool of himself going nuts on the first base umpire, getting tossed in the process. So apparently he thought it was the umpire's fault? Give me a break.

Rockies' offense. The Rox were held to seven runs in a three-game series against the Giants, which normally would be forgiveable, but they didn't face Tim Lincecum in the stretch and were handcuffed by Ryan Vogelsong Sunday. Yes, the same Vogelsong who entered Sunday with a career ERA of 5.79 and could only get through four innings against the Mets last time out. He even had a perfect game through five against the now-punchless Colorado offense. The Rockies have lost four in a row and six of seven. There are several problems on the team -- such as late-inning relief pitching -- but they've got to hit the ball better than this. Of course, things could be worse ... see below.

Brewers' offense. The Brewers just concluded a 10-game road trip where they were shut out three times and scored only once three other times (like Sunday in a 3-1 loss). Kyle McClellan might have a 5-0 record, but he entered the game having allowed 14 hits, four walks and nine earned runs (7.59 ERA) in his past two starts. One of those bad outings came against the Astros, too. And he took a shutout into the ninth against these Brewers, who are supposed to have a strong offense. Of course, Yuniesky Betancourt hitting sixth should tell you all you need to know. It's not a deep lineup. And Prince Fielder is gone after this season. Meanwhile they've traded away virtually every decent prospect to make a run this season and are 14-20. Things need to turn around. Fortunately the Brewers return home -- where they're 8-5 -- for a six-game homestand against the Padres and Pirates. It could make them right. We'll see.

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Posted on: April 6, 2011 6:24 pm
Edited on: April 6, 2011 6:27 pm
 

Pirates impressive early on


By C. Trent Rosecrans

The Pirates are better than you think.

Is Pittsburgh going to challenge for the NL Central crown? No. Are they going to break their streak of losing seasons? Probably not. But they they will be better this season than they have been in many years and in the next couple of seasons, winning baseball in the Steel City may become a reality.

Pittsburgh has taken two of three from the Cardinals and Cubs to start the season, beating St. Louis 3-1 on Wednesday.

The main reason the Pirates are sitting at 4-2 is they have a legit top of their lineup.

Pittsburgh's top four hitters -- Jose Tabata, Neil Walker, Andrew McCutchen and Lyle Overbay -- are hitting a combined .356/.434/.621 in the team's first games. Walker and McCutchen each have a pair of homers, with Overbay adding another.

That's not a pace the team can sustain, but McCutchen is on the edge of stardom, while Walker and Tabata are good, emerging players. Overbay is the type of player with better results than reputation. A career .274/.358/.447 hitter, he's unlikely to continue hitting .304/..385/.522, but shouldn't fall too far.

Walker's performance as a rookie last season was overshadowed by an historic first-year class, but he still put up a very good season, hitting .296/.349/.462 with 12 home runs in 110 games for his hometown team.  Tabata's prospect status took a hit in the last couple of years, but he too put up solid rookie numbers in 2010, hitting .299/.346/.400 in 102 games.

Add in Pedro Alvarez, Ryan Doumit and Garrett Jones, and there's the making of an effective offense.

As of Wednesday afternoon, the Pirates are hitting .271/.333/.409 with six home runs. With that, the Pirates' starters have a 2.52 ERA through six games. That's unlikely to continue in a rotation of Kevin Correia, Paul Maholm, James McDonald, Charlie Morton and Ross Ohlendorf they've pitched well, with Correia picking up two wins so far this season and have made the Pirates anything but a pushover early.

Joel Hanrahan has been the rare closer in the big leagues to convert all of his save chances, recording the save in all four of the PIrates' wins this season.

It should also be noted that all six games have been on the road, where Pittsburgh had an MLB-worst 17-64 record a year ago.

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Posted on: March 23, 2011 10:22 pm
 

3 up, 3 down for 3/23: Seven strong for Shields



By Matt Snyder


3 UP

James Shields, Rays. Roy Oswalt getting clocked in the head overshadowed this outing -- and rightfully so at the time -- but Shields threw a masterpiece against the Phillies Wednesday. It wasn't against scrubs either, as names like Rollins, Howard and Ibanez were in the order. He went seven shutout innings, allowing just four hits and one walk. He struck out four while lowering his spring ERA to 1.88.

Carlos Silva, Cubs. With Randy Wells nailing down the No. 4 spot in the Cubs' starting rotation, there's only one opening remaining. Silva had been brutal so far this spring, but he made a case to remain in consideration Wednesday. He threw six innings and coughed up just one earned run. In fact, he only allowed three hits and walked none. I still like Andrew Cashner for that job, but reports had Cubs' skipper Mike Quade very pleased with Silva's outing.

Matt Kemp, Dodgers. The 26 year old continued his torrid spring, crushing a three-run bomb off John Danks to highlight a 2-4 day. He's now hitting .320 with a 1.072 OPS this spring. He has five home runs and 15 RBI in only 50 at-bats.

3 DOWN

Matt Cain, Giants. He entered the game with five scoreless innings under his belt in the spring. He left with a 5.63 spring ERA after giving up seven hits and five earned runs in three innings. Good thing the spring games don't count.

Daniel Hudson, Diamondbacks. The promising young arm for the Snakes couldn't get through three innings after allowing eight hits, two walks and seven runs. Only one of the runs was earned, but a Hudson throwing error was what helped open the door for the huge Rangers' third inning.

Ryan Doumit, Pirates. An interesting case, as you could glance at the box score and see Doumit collected two hits in four at-bats. But look deeper, as his ineptitude in everything but handling the stick was illustrated Wednesday. He allowed his third passed ball of the spring and was picked off on the basepaths -- twice! As the Pirates reportedly continue to shop him, efforts like these won't help.

BONUS -- YOU MAKE THE CALL

Francisco Liriano, Twins. He struck out nine hitters in three innings. Yes, every out he recorded was of the punch-out variety. Of course, he needed 76 pitches just to get through those three innings and along the way he walked three guys and gave up four hits. The one earned run isn't awful (it would be a 3.00 ERA), but a walk per inning is, just like the WHIP of more than two. Still, love seeing nine K in three innings. So would the outing be listed in up or down? You make the call.

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Posted on: March 7, 2011 10:28 am
Edited on: March 7, 2011 2:35 pm
 

Astros searching for catching

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Jason CastroWhen Jason Castro went down with a sprained knee, the Astros were content with what they had in camp to cover their catching needs.

But when the news came back that Castro had suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament (on the play seen at the left) and would miss the majority of the season, that plan changed.

"We're reassessing it," Astros owner Drayton McLane told Steve Campbell of the Houston Chronicle

Castro is still the team's long-term catcher, but the team may look outside for a stopgap solution. Currently the team has Humberto Quintero and J.R. Towles -- neither of whom profile as much more than quality backups.

The team has just three other catchers in camp, Carlos Corporan, Brian Esposito and Rene Garcia. Neither Corporan, 27, nor Esposito, 32, are prospects, while the 20-year old Garcia hit just .250/.288/.308 combined at the two levels of Class A last season.

"At the end of the day, I'm hoping the guys we have here step up and do what they're capable of doing and win the job," general manager Ed Wade said. "At the same time, if I get a call from somebody and they say, 'Hey, we've got so-and-so available, and this is what we're looking for,' and it fits what we're trying to do, we'd be prepared to do something today."

Ryan DoumitFront-line catching talent isn't exactly easy to find. One of the few catchers on the trading block is Pirates catcher Ryan Doumit.

However, Doumit is owed $5.1 million this season and is far from Ivan Rodriguez behind the plate. But he does have a bat and a bat that would play well at Minute Maid Park. In 72 career plate appearances in Houston, Doumit has hit .292/.347/.446 with three home runs.

Still, Pirates GM Neal Huntington said his phone hasn't exactly been ringing off the hook for Doumit.

"There's really no conversations going on because everybody's focused on their own clubs," Huntington told Ron Musselman of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

UPDATE: MLB.com's Bill Ladson writes the Astros have asked the Nationals about Jesus Flores, but is concerned about the health of Flores' right shoulder, which has kept him off the field the last two seasons.
The Nationals have depth at catcher with starter and future Hall of Famer Ivan Rodriguez, along with Wilson Ramos, who is considered their catcher of the future. The team also things Derek Norris is ready to hit at in the big leagues and is improving defensively.
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