Tag:A.J. Burnett
Posted on: October 2, 2011 1:44 pm
Edited on: October 2, 2011 8:17 pm
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A.J. Burnett to start Game 4 for Yankees

By Matt Snyder

Embattled pitcher A.J. Burnett will start Game 4 of the ALDS for the Yankees, should the game be necessary, the team announced Sunday. Burnett was originally only going to pitch out of the bullpen in the series, but the rain suspended-Game 1 altered the pitching plans for both teams and a fourth starter was needed for New York.

Burnett, 34, signed a five-year, $82.5 million deal before the 2009 season and wasn't bad his first season. The Yankees won the World Series and Burnett was 13-9 with a 4.04 ERA in the regular season. The past two seasons, however, Burnett's been erratic at best and awful at worst. Combining 2010-11, Burnett is 21-26 -- and this is for one of the best teams in baseball, mind you -- with a 5.20 ERA and 1.47 WHIP. In 2010, he led the majors in hit batsmen. In 2011, he led the majors in wild pitches. He was shelled in his playoff start against the Rangers last season, and he managed both a hit-by-pitch and a wild pitch.

Basically, prepare for an adventurous Game 4. Burnett's taking the hill.

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Posted on: September 25, 2011 12:01 pm
 

On Deck: Pivotal day for wild cards



By Evan Brunell


Follow all games live with CBSSports.com's GameTracker.

Big day: It's possible that by the second game of the doubleheader, the Red Sox will know a loss drops them into a tie for the wild card. In the first game of a doubleheader, the Sox throw Tim Wakefield against A.J. Burnett, two pitchers with ERAs north of 5.00. In the second game, Boston offers up sacrificial lamb John Lackey and his 6.49 ERA against Ivan Nova. That's not exactly a duo of pitchers that inspires confidence. If the Red Sox lose both games and the Rays win, there will be a tie in the wild card. Red Sox vs. Yankees, 1:05, 6:05 p.m. ET

MinorDetwilerStaving off collapse: A wild-card collapse is also possible in the NL, where the Braves are two up on the Cardinals. Unfortunately, Atlanta is going up against the Nationals, who has been on a hot streak lately and is sending Ross Detwiler to the mound. Detwiler has yet to put in a full year's work, but is locking up a 2012 rotation spot thanks to his strong 3.30 ERA in 60 innings, posting the best walk rate of his short major-league career. The Braves will counter with their own young lefty, Mike Minor. Minor has a 4.27 ERA in 78 innings. Braves vs. Nationals, 1:35 p.m. ET

Losing streak
: The stumbling Phillies, losers of eight straight, will look to Roy Halladay to play stopper against the Mets. Chasing his 19th win, Halladay is going up against the Mets as Philadelphia tries to avoid a MLB record ninth straight loss after clinching a division title. "I'm sitting there watching it. Don't know what I can do about it," manager Charlie Manuel told the Associated Press. "If you want to know the truth, our team's out of sync, definitely out of focus, and we're not playing. The Mets counter with Mike Pelfrey. Phillies vs. Mets, 2:10 p.m. ET

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Posted on: September 24, 2011 10:10 pm
Edited on: September 24, 2011 10:12 pm
 

Playoff race: Rays could catch Boston on Sunday

Carl Crawford

By C. Trent Rosecrans

The Rays could catch the Red Sox as soon as Sunday following Saturday's 6-2 victory over the Blue Jays and the Red Sox's 9-1 loss to the Yankees. Tampa Bay trails Boston by just 1.5 games after Saturday's games.

Wade Davis takes the hill for Tampa Bay against Brett Cecil, while the Red Sox send Tim Wakefield and John Lackey to the mound for their doubleheader in New York against A.J. Burnett and Ivan Nova. A Rays win and a Yankees sweep would tie the teams in the wild card standings with just three games remaining.

If you're a Red Sox fan, it looks like now's the time to get nervous (if you weren't already).

Here's what's left for both teams:

Boston Red Sox
88-69
Remaining schedule: 2 @ NYY, 3 @BAL
Coolstandings.com expectancy of wild card: 88.4 percent

Tampa Bay Rays
87-71, 1.5 GB
Remaining schedule: 1 v. TOR, 3 v. NYY
Coolstandings.com expectancy of wild card: 10 percent

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Posted on: September 20, 2011 11:10 am
 

Burnett really liked his outing Monday

By Matt Snyder

Lost in the shuffle of Mariano Rivera's record-setting save Monday was maligned starting pitcher A.J. Burnett not being able to get through even five innings against the patchwork lineup of the Twins -- who have the worst record in the American League. Burnett gave up nine hits and four earned runs in four innings. He did strikeout eight while walking just one. Still, the nine hits, including two home runs and a double -- again, this was against a bad offense -- would seem to indicate he didn't really have his best stuff.

If you ask Burnett, you'd hear otherwise. In fact, he seems to believe manager Joe Girardi removed him too early. From the New York Daily News:
"I didn't get through the fifth because I wasn't allowed to get through the fifth. It wasn't that I couldn't get through the fifth," Burnett said of Girardi lifting him with a runner on second and none out in that inning ...

"I thought I was nasty, to be honest with you. (Girardi) left me in there in the fourth and I got out of it. Joe does what he can to get this team a win and we won ... But I felt good about myself until he took me out."
So, has the bar really been lowered that far for Burnett? Allowing a run per inning and more than two hits per inning leaves him feeling good about himself. This is a guy making $16.5 million a year and producing a 5.28 ERA, 1.46 WHIP and an MLB-high 25 wild pitches. The Yankees are 15-16 in his 31 starts and 77-44 when he doesn't start.

But I suppose that's Girardi's fault, too.

Hat-tip: Big League Stew

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Category: MLB
Posted on: September 8, 2011 10:06 am
Edited on: September 8, 2011 10:38 am
 

Pepper: Marlins' new home could bring makeover



By Matt Snyder


While it certainly doesn't necessarily mean on-field success, the Florida Marlins are about to finally have their own home. After sharing a park with the NFL's Miami Dolphins since first taking the field in 1993, the Marlins will begin 2012 with a baseball-only facility in Miami. Wednesday, local media were given a tour of the facility and the Marlins took the opportunity to sing their own praises.

"This will be the first ballpark to come in on budget and on time in a long, long time," team President David Samson said (Sun-Sentinel.com). "There will not be overruns in this building. This building will come in at the $515 million mark, not one dollar over budget, [and] not one thing taken out of the building. As a matter of fact, we have been able to add things because the workers have been so efficient and it has been built so well."

Samson also noted that he's personally sat in every single seat and went with the proverbial "there's not a bad seat in the house" sentiment.

So the Marlins' fans will finally have a place that seems like a real home instead of some rental where a baseball game seems foreign and unwelcome. Attendance will surely increase (the Marlins average less than 19,000 fans per game this year -- and that's paid, not how many actually show up), but what about the problem that has plagued the Marlins for years: Payroll?

"I know it will be at levels previously unseen," Samson said (Sun-Sentinel.com).

Interesting.

The time might be now to start ramping up the baseball excitement, south Florida.

Real life 'Wild Thing:' If you like baseball and don't love Charlie Sheen's character -- Ricky "Wild Thing" Vaughn -- in "Major League," well, you might have as many screws loose as Sheen. In the movie, Vaughn earned the nickname after loading the bases with walks on 12 straight pitches and then later set a record for wild pitches in an inning. Embattled Yankees starting pitcher A.J. Burnett didn't do it in an inning, but he has now joined rare company with his wild pitches. With three Wednesday, he became the first pitcher since 1919 to have eight games with at least three wild pitches (Baseball-Reference blog).

A better Johan? Mets ace Johan Santana has been sidelined all season after having a surgical procedure in 2010. But he's getting closer and closer to possibly seeing some relief work this September, just to get him back on the mound for an inning or two. And get this: Mets' pitching coach Dan Warthen said Santana's stuff is better right now than it was last season (when he had a 2.98 ERA in 199 innings). "Better velocity," Warthen said (NYDailyNews.com). "The arm was in the same slot each and every time. He wasn't searching for a place that didn't hurt."

Emotional season: Nationals catcher Wilson Ramos came to America in 2004 to chase his dream of playing Major League Baseball. But through the long visa process, his family had never been able to get here to see him play in person ... until this season. His parents recently secured a 10-year visa and finally got to see their son play a big-league game in person this homestand (Washington Times).

Rock and a hard place: "Moneyball" is coming to theaters soon, as I'm sure most of us have seen the previews during commercial breaks on TV by now. For those uninformed, it's a film adaptation of the book about A's general manager Billy Beane trying to build a team without the resources of a large-market club (or even a middle-market one). Beane hasn't really said anything about it, and Wednesday he explained why: "The hard thing for me has been figuring out how to walk this fine line," Beane said (Mercurynews.com). "If I embrace all this movie stuff, it looks like I'm really digging it. But if I put my hand up and say, 'No,' I look like I'm distancing myself from it. There's no playbook for this."

Old Style at Wrigley: Pabst brewing company nearly nixed a deal with Wrigley Field, where Cubs fans have been consuming Old Style beer since 1950, but tradition won out -- as the contract was extended through 2013. As a Cubs fan I can tell you that it's tradition to buy one and suck it down each time you attend a game -- even if it tastes like crap (it kind of does). (Chicago Breaking Sports)

Milwaukee loves 'Tony Plush:" Brewers outfielder Nyjer Morgan has become an unlikely popular player this season, and the T-shirt depicting his alter-ego -- "Tony Plush" -- outsells all other Brewers' T-shirts three-fold (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel). I wonder if Chris Carpenter wants one (click here if you don't get it)? I kid, but it would at the very least be a funny prank for a teammate to get him one.

Wild beats Man: A squirrel broke into the Indians' bullpen Wednesday night and closer Chris Perez attempted to capture it with his jacket. He lost, as the squirrel ran up the bullpen wall and jumped into the center-field bushes (Detroit Free-Press).

Happy Anniversary: On this day 25 years ago, Rafael Palmeiro made his major-league debut (Hardball Times). He'd go on to accumulate 3,020 hits, 569 home runs, nearly 2,000 RBI, a Gold Glove in a season when he only played 28 games in the field and one embarrassing display in front of Congress that has now been immortalized by Larry David.

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Posted on: September 8, 2011 2:23 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Williams' gem leads Angels

Jerome Williams

By C. Trent Rosecrans

Jerome Williams, Angels: Williams was one of three pitchers to take a no-hitter into the sixth inning along with Oakland's Guillermo Moscoso and Philadelphia's Roy Oswalt, but neither of those pitchers was pitching for such high stakes. With the Rangers losing earlier in the day to the Rays, the Angels took the field Wednesday night knowing they could make up ground on their rivals in the only real playoff race left. Williams retired 15 of the first 16 batters he faced before Seattle's Trayvon Robinson homered to lead off the sixth inning and put Los Angeles in a 1-0 hole. It looked as if Robinson's stellar start would go for naught until the Angels rallied for three runs in the eighth inning to give Robinson and the Angels the 3-1 victory and to pull to 2.5 games behind the Rangers. Robinson's homer was the only hit the Mariners would record, as Williams struck out five and walked one.

Mark Reynolds, Orioles: Reynolds struck out four times (fun stat for the guy who's always sitting next to me at baseball games, strikeouts are worth one out, just like any other way a player makes an out), but with two outs in the 11th inning, Reynolds came through against Hector Noesi with an RBI single to give Baltimore a 5-4 victory in the Bronx.

Carlos Pena, Cubs: Pena was hitting just .135 off of left-handed pitchers and Reds lefty Bill Bray had limited left-handed hitters to just a .188 batting average this season -- so Dusty Baker's decision to replace Logan Ondrusek with Bray was sound. It just didn't work. With the game tied at 3 and one on and one out in the eighth inning, Pena caught up to Bray's first-pitch slider that didn't slide and put it on Sheffield Avenue for a 6-3 Cubs victory. Pena has five home runs and 16 RBI against the Reds this season.


A.J. Burnett, Yankees: As far as Burnett starts go, the Yankee whipping boy wasn't too bad on Wednesday, allowing four runs on seven hits in six innings, striking out seven and walking four. No, those aren't great numbers, but it's certainly good for Burnett this season. However, he did make history -- and not the kind he'd like -- on Wednesday with three wild pitches. It was the eighth time he's recorded at least three wild pitches in his career, the most in the modern history. Nolan Ryan, Phil Niekro and Tommy John all had seven games with three wild pitches, which is pretty decent company. Burnett has 23 wild pitches this season, the most in baseball.

Daniel Bard, Red Sox: Thanks to Bard, Tim Wakefield failed in his eighth attempt at his 200th career victory. With Boston leading 8-6 in the eighth inning, Bard hit the first batter he faced and after loading the bases and recording two outs, he gave up the lead by walking Eric Thames and Jose Bautista to tie the game. Matt Albers then came in to relieve Bard and gave up a three-run double to Edwin Encarnacion, who drove in five in the game to give the Jays the lead for good. Wakefield wasn't great, allowing five runs (four earned) and three hits in five innings. He walked three and hit two more, but was in line to record the W.

Orlando Cabrera, Giants: Many around the Bay Area are wondering why Giants manager Bruce Bochy is sticking with Cabrera over rookie Brandon Crawford at shortstop everyday. It didn't get any better in the team's 3-1 loss to the Padres on Wednesday. In the eighth inning, Cabrera dropped an easy popup behind the infield by Wil Venable, who later scored on a Cameron Maybin triple to give San Diego a two-run cushion going into the ninth with closer Heath Bell on the mound. It was Cabrera's fifth error in 30 games with the Giants. He's also struggling at the plate, going 3 for 28 in the team's last 10 games, including an 0-for-3 night on Wednesday.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Posted on: August 27, 2011 1:44 am
Edited on: August 27, 2011 1:45 am
 

3 Up, 3 Down: Capuano dazzles in career game

Capuano

By Evan Brunell

3 UpChris Capuano, Mets: It was a game for the ages for Capuano, who threw a complete game shutout while punching out a career-high 13, limiting the Braves to just two hits and zero walks. It was just the second loss in nine games for Atlanta, throwing 122 pitches in the effort. Capuano had a perfect game through five until Dan Uggla singled to break it up. The lefty had two good seasons for the Brewers back in 2005-06, but missed two seasons starting in 2008, and only tallied up 66 innings last year before moving to the Mets, where he's had a bounceback year with 154 1/3 innings with a 4.43 ERA. Capuano isn't a great pitcher, but he's a capable back-of-the-rotation starter that's providing value to New York at minimal cost.

James Shields, Rays: While James Shields won't win the Cy Young Award, he's making a bid to finish pretty high up in the standings, as he blew away the Royals, allowing just one run in a complete game, whiffing 12 to give him 192 on the year. His ERA is down to 2.96 in 201 innings and set a prestigious record for being the first pitcher to register at least 10 complete games in a season since CC Sabathia in 2008 between the Indians and Brewers. It's also just the second time it's happened since 2000, so Shields has accomplished something quite remarkable.

Nelson Cruz, Rangers: Cruz was a beast Friday, allowing the Rangers to take a three-game lead in the AL West. He slammed two home runs and doubles apiece to grab his 27th and 28th of the year, chipping in six RBI to push up to 84 and added three runs on a monstrous 4-for-5 night. He's now hitting .265/.318/.528 on the year, but August hasn't been kind to Cruz thus far. This game snaps a 4-for-23 skid.



3 DownRoy Oswalt, Phillies:  In Oswalt's last start, he had an outing worthy of landing on the 3 Up. But Friday, he had nothing against Florida, giving up five earned runs in 5 2/3 innings, coughing up 12 hits while allowing a walk and striking out just two. "It was pretty much one bad pitch," Oswalt told the Associated Press, referring to Marlins catcher John Buck's grand slam . "[It was] a slider that didn't do what I wanted it to do." Oswalt was surprisingly booed by his home crowd, and now has a 3.77 ERA on the year. He's been touch and go ever since missing over a month with a back injury, and this was just one of these days where nothing quite worked.

A.J. Burnett, Yankees: What can you say about A.J. Burnett these days? His ERA is now 11.91 in August after giving up nine runs in five innings against the Orioles. He also racked up nine hits allowed. That August ERA is pretty bad, but so is his ERA in the second half of the year: 8.64. Phil Hughes isn't exactly doing a great job forcing the issue, but the Yankees need to skip Burnett in the rotation and put him on layaway for a bit. It's time for drastic measures, as nothing is working. Give Hughes a few turns through, and then re-evaluate things. If New York wants Burnett locked in for the postseason, a breather may be the best thing at this point.

Jose Constanza, Braves: Even through the hubbub around manager Fredi Gonzalez sitting Jason Heyward in favor for Constanza, everyone seemed to realize the benching would only be temporary. Eventually Constanza would cool off after a scorching start. Well, after going 0 for 3 with a strikeout against the Mets, it dropped his average to .173 over the last 23 at-bats. The cooling off is starting and should eventually result in Heyward returning to full-time play. Just in time for the postseason, too.

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Posted on: August 22, 2011 9:35 am
 

Pepper: Pirates send small message with Tabata



By Matt Snyder


The Pirates announced Sunday that they agreed to terms with outfielder Jose Tabata. He'll be paid $14 million over the next six seasons, with options that could keep Tabata in Pittsburgh through 2019 (Associated Press). The deal buys out the remaining three years of arbitration, but that's not the important part -- which is that the Pirates made a long-term commitment to a young player.

Tabata, 23, has a .356 on-base percentage with 15 stolen bases and 44 runs this year in 75 games, serving mostly as the leadoff man.

He is certainly no Andrew McCutchen and he's been signed for a pretty cheap deal, but the signal is the same as it was when the Pirates were buyers at the trade deadline: These Pirates aren't a laughing matter anymore. No longer is ownership content to simply be a virtual Triple-A team, developing players only to have them traded or leave via free agency. When they lock up McCutchen, which I fully expect, the signal will be even louder. Granted, the Pirates will never be a large-market spender, but the increased attendance this season shows the fans are still there, should the team become a legitimate contender. Expect the Tabata deal to be the first of several.

Strasburg Watch: Nationals ace Stephen Strasburg will make his fourth rehab start Monday. He'll pitch for Class-A Hagerstown again, where he was shelled last time out. He was dominant in his first two outings, however, so Monday will be a good gauge to see if that was simply an off-day. He's going to be working toward four innings and 65 pitches (Nationals Journal). That's a huge sign, because from 65 pitches, a lot of pitchers jump to 80 next time. Presumably, 80 pitches is enough to get back to the bigs. Strasburg is scheduled to have a fifth rehab start August 27, but if everything goes well in these next two outings, that's likely all he'll need before joining the Nats.

Joe on A.J.: Yankees manager Joe Girardi and struggling starting pitcher A.J. Burnett appeared to exchange some pretty heated words Saturday night, but both Girardi and Burnett said the issue was Burnett's anger at the home plate umpire. Girardi reiterated that sentiment Sunday, but also noted Burnett is on shaky ground due to his pitching performance. "The reality is he needs to pitch better," Girardi said (New York Times baseball blog).

Pronk injured: Indians designated hitter Travis Hafner broke an 0-for-16 slump with a single late in Sunday's game, but when he rounded first base, he pulled up lame and limped his way to getting tagged out and back to the dugout. He has a right foot strain, which is a similar injury to one that kept him out for five games earlier in the season (MLB.com).

Time for revenge: It's been a while since the Rangers and Red Sox played. In fact, it was the first series of the season. Many of us may have forgotten the Rangers kicked the Red Sox teeth in for three games, sweeping them and outscoring them 26-11 in three games. It's the only team the Red Sox have played this season and not beaten. Reliever Daniel Bard certainly hasn't forgotten, though, as he said "we owe them something for the first series of the year," Sunday (BostonHerald.com). The two teams square off for a four-game series in Texas, beginning Monday.

Winded Grandyman: Yankees center fielder Curtis Granderson hit an inside-the-park home run at Minnesota Sunday, and he was a bit tired after the trip around the bases. “It was good until everyone wanted to talk,” Granderson said (LoHud). ” As we’re coming in, everyone was asking about it, and I couldn’t really talk too much.”

Action Jackson: Tigers center fielder Austin Jackson ended Sunday's game by throwing out the would-be tying run at home plate. A game-ending double play scored 8-2 hasn't happened since 1988 when Pirates center fielder Andy Van Slyke pulled it off, according to Baseball-Reference.com.

Swarzak in, Blackburn out: Twins starting pitcher Nick Blackburn injured his right forearm early in his start against the Yankees Sunday, and it looks like he's headed for the disabled list, as the Twins have already named a replacement in the rotation. Anthony Swarzak will get the spot (Around the Majors). Swarzak is 2-2 with a 3.16 ERA and 1.05 WHIP in five starts this season.

Love for Hendry: Recently-fired Cubs (former) general manager Jim Hendry has been beaten down pretty good in terms of fans, message boards, Twitter, etc. But you rarely hear anything bad about him as a person from his own players, media who know him personally or even opposing players. Former Cubs shorstop Ryan Theriot -- who Hendry traded last season -- joins in, calling Hendry a good person who has a good heart (Chicago Tribune).

Leyland tossed again: Tigers manager Jim Leyland had a pretty nice ejection Sunday, marking the fifth time in the past two months he's been run. The Detroit Free-Press has a list of the five ejections.

On this date: Mark McGwire made his big-league debut 25 years ago today. (Hardball Times)

Oh, Nails: Former Phillies and Mets outfielder Lenny Dykstra is currently serving time in prison because he filed for bankruptcy and then tried to sell off part of his estate for profit -- which is otherwise known as embezzlement -- and was also accused of lying under oath and trying to hide some of his assets from the bankruptcy court. Apparently, however, Lenny doesn't believe the law applies to him because he was good in the 1993 World Series. Seriously: Read his post by clicking here and let me know if I'm wrong, but I believe that's kind of his argument -- warning, the post has the grammar and spelling of an eight year old. The best part is that Dykstra is delusional enough to believe he's been targeted by a government that wants to redeem itself for the O.J. Simpson case by nailing a celebrity. I mean, you can't make this stuff up. It's amazing.

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